10

Can anyone think of a nicer way to do the following:

public string ShortDescription
{
    get { return this.Description.Length <= 25 ? this.Description : this.Description.Substring(0, 25) + "..."; }
}

I would have liked to just do string.Substring(0, 25) but it throws an exception if the string is less than the length supplied.

7
  • 3
    Are you sure you want 25 + "..."? Wouldn't that be better as 22 + "..."?
    – tddmonkey
    Feb 27, 2009 at 14:41
  • I don't really see what issue you would be having with your code.
    – mmcdole
    Feb 27, 2009 at 14:49
  • I was mainly looking for a single method that does the above for me. Similar to Substring that doesn't throw the exception. There is always extension methods but I was looking for something already built. Feb 27, 2009 at 14:55
  • Have in mind my comment on your answer. "No,no,no ! This will create a copy of this.Description because the string class is immutable even if we have a short description ( < 25)." Feb 27, 2009 at 15:13
  • I thing that you have the best solution. But if you will use it on more properties and places it will be good to extract it in a separate method. Feb 27, 2009 at 15:14

12 Answers 12

28

I needed this so often, I wrote an extension method for it:

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string SafeSubstring(this string input, int startIndex, int length, string suffix)
    {
        // Todo: Check that startIndex + length does not cause an arithmetic overflow - not that this is likely, but still...
        if (input.Length >= (startIndex + length))
        {
            if (suffix == null) suffix = string.Empty;
            return input.Substring(startIndex, length) + suffix;
        }
        else
        {
            if (input.Length > startIndex)
            {
                return input.Substring(startIndex);
            }
            else
            {
                return string.Empty;
            }
        }
    }
}

if you only need it once, that is overkill, but if you need it more often then it can come in handy.

Edit: Added support for a string suffix. Pass in "..." and you get your ellipses on shorter strings, or pass in string.Empty for no special suffixes.

5
  • 1
    I think this is the best answer (+1), but timing means I doubt it'll get the appropriate amount of votes, sadly. Feb 27, 2009 at 15:01
  • Doesn't really matter that much - there is a good answer in already by marcumka which helps in this specific case, it could help people in the future when searching, and usually late stuff gets votes over time - i still get votes for 5 month old stuff.
    – Michael Stum
    Feb 27, 2009 at 15:06
  • Won't remember to vote this up in 5 months, so I'm doing it now. ;-)
    – Tomalak
    Feb 27, 2009 at 15:25
  • 1
    Arithmetic overflow on string indexes? Guess it could happen, but that would be one long string.
    – Kibbee
    Feb 27, 2009 at 15:36
  • True, but just in case someone passes in int.MaxValue - be it intentional or not - there should be a proper handling (as in: OverflowException) instead of "weird" results
    – Michael Stum
    Feb 27, 2009 at 15:42
22
return this.Description.Substring(0, Math.Min(this.Description.Length, 25));

Doesn't have the ... part. Your way is probably the best, actually.

7
  • I like your way better. If I was going to use the terniary operator, I'd probably do it on the length. However, Math.max is clearer.
    – Brian
    Feb 27, 2009 at 14:41
  • I think you should use Math.Min not Math.Max here :-) Feb 27, 2009 at 14:41
  • I think it reads more closely to the actual intent of the method. You do lose the ellipsis at the end though.
    – Herms
    Feb 27, 2009 at 15:08
  • No,no,no ! This will create a copy of this.Description because the string class is immutable even if we have a short description ( < 25). Feb 27, 2009 at 15:11
  • Unless this is used in a tight loop a million times, the copy of the description made if it is <25 chars is probably nothing to be concerned with.
    – user7116
    Feb 27, 2009 at 15:29
11
public static Take(this string s, int i)
{
    if(s.Length <= i)
        return s
    else
        return s.Substring(0, i) + "..."
}

public string ShortDescription
{
    get { return this.Description.Take(25); }
}
2
  • We've got basically the same solution, but I don't like the method "Take" because it's already "taken" for strings by LINQ, as string implements IEnumerable<char>
    – Jon Skeet
    Feb 27, 2009 at 14:48
  • (Deleted my answer as it really is just the same as yours.)
    – Jon Skeet
    Feb 27, 2009 at 14:50
6

The way you've done it seems fine to me, with the exception that I would use the magic number 25, I'd have that as a constant.

Do you really want to store this in your bean though? Presumably this is for display somewhere, so your renderer should be the thing doing the truncating instead of the data object

4

Well I know there's answer accepted already and I may get crucified for throwing out a regular expression here but this is how I usually do it:

//may return more than 25 characters depending on where in the string 25 characters is at
public string ShortDescription(string val)
{
    return Regex.Replace(val, @"(.{25})[^\s]*.*","$1...");
}
// stricter version that only returns 25 characters, plus 3 for ...
public string ShortDescriptionStrict(string val)
{
    return Regex.Replace(val, @"(.{25}).*","$1...");
}

It has the nice side benefit of not cutting a word in half as it always stops after the first whitespace character past 25 characters. (Of course if you need it to truncate text going into a database, that might be a problem.

Downside, well I'm sure it's not the fastest solution possible.

EDIT: replaced … with "..." since not sure if this solution is for the web!

3
  • Cute! Not the most readable approach but like the not splitting words. Feb 27, 2009 at 16:40
  • I say it's not the most readable approach because I struggle to read and understand regular expressions. Other people may find it a breeze! Feb 27, 2009 at 16:41
  • Yeah, I'm not the best at writing Regex either, so I'm sure there are improvements that could be made there. Feb 27, 2009 at 18:35
3

without .... this should be the shortest :

public string ShortDescription
{
    get { return Microsoft.VisualBasic.Left(this.Description;}
}
1
  • 1
    Ahh the trusty VB left function. Why did that never make it into the String class?! Feb 27, 2009 at 16:07
1

I think the approach is sound, though I'd recommend a few adjustments

  • Move the magic number to a const or configuration value
  • Use a regular if conditional rather than the ternary operator
  • Use a string.Format("{0}...") rather than + "..."
  • Have just one return point from the function

So:

public string ShortDescription
{
    get
    {
        const int SHORT_DESCRIPTION_LENGTH = 25;

        string _shortDescription = Description;

        if (Description.Length > SHORT_DESCRIPTION_LENGTH)
        {
            _shortDescription = string.Format("{0}...", Description.Substring(0, SHORT_DESCRIPTION_LENGTH));
        }

        return _shortDescription;
    }
}

For a more general approach, you might like to move the logic to an extension method:

public static string ToTruncated(this string s, int truncateAt)
{
    string truncated = s;

    if (s.Length > truncateAt)
    {
        truncated = string.Format("{0}...", s.Substring(0, truncateAt));
    }

    return truncated;
}

Edit

I use the ternary operator extensively, but prefer to avoid it if the code becomes sufficiently verbose that it starts to extend past 120 characters or so. In that case I'd like to wrap it onto multiple lines, so find that a regular if conditional is more readable.

Edit2

For typographical correctness you could also consider using the ellipsis character (…) as opposed to three dots/periods/full stops (...).

7
  • aw, this is a great opportunity to use the ternary -- a one-liner. Feb 27, 2009 at 14:41
  • Why do people hate on ternary so much? Feb 27, 2009 at 14:46
  • IMO, using the + operator seems more straight-forward in this case. Other two suggestions sound good to me.
    – Greg
    Feb 27, 2009 at 14:47
  • I agree with most of your points, however it does make for bloated code. Easy on the eye but not much room for any other code. Feb 27, 2009 at 14:49
  • I find that bloat vs genericness vs readability is often a tough one. I try to use a style that favours consistency above all else, which means that short bits of code often get a little bloated.
    – Richard Ev
    Feb 27, 2009 at 14:53
1

One way to do it:

int length = Math.Min(Description.Length, 25);
return Description.Substring(0, length) + "...";

There are two lines instead of one, but shorter ones :).

Edit: As pointed out in the comments, this gets you the ... all the time, so the answer was wrong. Correcting it means we go back to the original solution.

At this point, I think using string extensions is the only option to shorten the code. And that makes sense only when that code is repeated in at least a few places...

4
  • If you're only going to use a variable once, you can often get rid of it and simplify your code. E.g. Welblog's solution.
    – Brian
    Feb 27, 2009 at 14:45
  • @Brian - that's up to him. One may argue that temporary variables make it easier for the reader... Oh, and they're the same answers, were written at the same time :)
    – Dan C.
    Feb 27, 2009 at 14:50
  • BUT -- that gets you the "..." and every line. It should be included on when the string has been truncated. Feb 27, 2009 at 14:55
  • @James - good point. Well, correcting it gets us back to the original... pity.
    – Dan C.
    Feb 27, 2009 at 15:20
0

Looks fine to me, being really picky I would replace "..." with the entity reference "&hellip;"

1
  • Doesn't work so well if the text isn't going to be part of an XML/HTML/whatever document. Or do you mean a Unicode ellipsis character (if there is one)?
    – Jon Skeet
    Feb 27, 2009 at 14:51
0

I can't think of any but your approach might not be the best. Are you adding presentation logic into your data object? If so then I suggest you put that logic elsewhere, for example a static StringDisplayUtils class with a GetShortStringMethod( int maxCharsToDisplay, string stringToShorten).

However, that approach might not be great either. What about different fonts and character sets? You'd have to start measuring the actual string length in terms of pixels. Check out the AutoEllipsis property on the winform's Label class (you'll prob need to set AutoSize to false if using this). The AutoEllipsis property, when true, will shorten a string and add the '...' chars for you.

1
  • I agree with you. This code should be in a display helper method. As the display length may need to vary from page to page. This code is geared towards a web application so no AutoEllipsis property but nice solution for windows apps. Feb 27, 2009 at 15:11
0

I'd stick with what you have tbh, but just as an alternative, if you have LINQ to objects you could

new string(this.Description.ToCharArray().Take(25).ToArray())

//And to maintain the ...
+ (this.Description.Length <= 25 ? String.Empty : "...")

As others have said, you'd likely want to store 25 in a constant

0

You should see if you can reference the Microsoft.VisualBasic DLL into your app so you can make use of the "Left" function.

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