0

I'm building an application that let's the user export his/her work. This is a computationally heavy process, lasting for a minute or so, during which I want to show a progress bar (and make the rest of the UI unresponsive).

I've tried the implementation below, which works fine for a non-computationally expensive background process (e.g. waiting for 0.1 s). However, for a CPU heavy process, the UI becomes very laggy and unresponsive (but not completely unresponsive).

Any idea how I can solve this?

import sys
import time

from PySide2 import QtCore
from PySide2.QtCore import Qt
import PySide2.QtWidgets as QtWidgets


class MainWindow(QtWidgets.QMainWindow):
    """Main window, with one button for exporting stuff"""

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        central_widget = QtWidgets.QWidget(self)
        layout = QtWidgets.QHBoxLayout(self)
        button = QtWidgets.QPushButton("Press me...")
        button.clicked.connect(self.export_stuff)
        layout.addWidget(button)
        central_widget.setLayout(layout)
        self.setCentralWidget(central_widget)

    def export_stuff(self):
        """Opens dialog and starts exporting"""
        some_window = MyExportDialog(self)
        some_window.exec_()


class MyAbstractExportThread(QtCore.QThread):
    """Base export thread"""
    change_value = QtCore.Signal(int)

    def run(self):
        cnt = 0
        while cnt < 100:
            cnt += 1
            self.operation()
            self.change_value.emit(cnt)

    def operation(self):
        pass


class MyExpensiveExportThread(MyAbstractExportThread):

    def operation(self):
        """Something that takes a lot of CPU power"""
        some_val = 0
        for i in range(1000000):
            some_val += 1


class MyInexpensiveExportThread(MyAbstractExportThread):

    def operation(self):
        """Something that doesn't take a lot of CPU power"""
        time.sleep(.1)


class MyExportDialog(QtWidgets.QDialog):
    """Dialog which does some stuff, and shows its progress"""

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent, Qt.WindowCloseButtonHint)
        self.setWindowTitle("Exporting...")
        layout = QtWidgets.QHBoxLayout()
        self.progress_bar = self._create_progress_bar()
        layout.addWidget(self.progress_bar)
        self.setLayout(layout)
        self.worker = MyInexpensiveExportThread()  # Works fine
        # self.worker = MyExpensiveExportThread()  # Super laggy
        self.worker.change_value.connect(self.progress_bar.setValue)
        self.worker.start()
        self.worker.finished.connect(self.close)

    def _create_progress_bar(self):
        progress_bar = QtWidgets.QProgressBar(self)
        progress_bar.setMinimum(0)
        progress_bar.setMaximum(100)
        return progress_bar


if __name__ == "__main__":
    app = QtWidgets.QApplication()
    window = MainWindow()
    window.show()
    sys.exit(app.exec_())
1

you should use asyncqt which is quamash spinoff for PySide2. I kept QThread implementation in your code and revised with QEventLoop. As an ultimate solution you should consider altering QThread implementation with run_in_executor as in asyncqt github page.

import sys
import time
import asyncio
from PySide2.QtCore import (Qt, Signal, Slot, QObject, QThread)
from PySide2.QtWidgets import (QApplication, QProgressBar, QWidget, QHBoxLayout, QPushButton, QMainWindow, QDialog)
from asyncqt import (QEventLoop, QThreadExecutor)


class MainWindow(QMainWindow):
    """Main window, with one button for exporting stuff"""

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent)
        central_widget = QWidget(self)
        layout = QHBoxLayout(self)
        button = QPushButton("Press me...")
        button.clicked.connect(self.export_stuff)
        layout.addWidget(button)
        central_widget.setLayout(layout)
        self.setCentralWidget(central_widget)

    def export_stuff(self):
        """Opens dialog and starts exporting"""
        some_window = MyExportDialog(self)
        some_window.exec_()


class MyAbstractExportThread(QThread):
    """Base export thread"""
    change_value = Signal(int)
    loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()

    def run(self):
        cnt = 0
        while cnt < 100:
            cnt += 1
            self.loop.run_until_complete(self.operation())
            self.change_value.emit(cnt)

    @asyncio.coroutine
    def operation(self):
        pass


class MyExpensiveExportThread(MyAbstractExportThread):

    @asyncio.coroutine
    def operation(self):
        """Something that takes a lot of CPU power"""
        some_val = 0
        for i in range(10000000):
            some_val += 1


class MyInexpensiveExportThread(MyAbstractExportThread):

    def operation(self):
        """Something that doesn't take a lot of CPU power"""
        time.sleep(.1)


class MyExportDialog(QDialog):
    """Dialog which does some stuff, and shows its progress"""

    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent, Qt.WindowCloseButtonHint)
        self.loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
        self.setWindowTitle("Exporting...")
        layout = QHBoxLayout()
        self.progress_bar = self._create_progress_bar()
        layout.addWidget(self.progress_bar)
        self.setLayout(layout)
        # self.worker = MyInexpensiveExportThread()  # Works fine
        self.worker = MyExpensiveExportThread()  # Super laggy
        self.worker.change_value.connect(self.set_progressbar)
        self.worker.finished.connect(self.close)

        with QThreadExecutor(1) as qt_thread_executor:
            loop.run_in_executor(qt_thread_executor, self.worker.start)

    def _create_progress_bar(self):
        progress_bar = QProgressBar(self)
        progress_bar.setMinimum(0)
        progress_bar.setMaximum(100)
        return progress_bar

    @Slot(int)
    def set_progressbar(self, value):
        self.loop.call_soon_threadsafe(self.progress_bar.setValue, value)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    app = QApplication()
    loop = QEventLoop(app)
    asyncio.set_event_loop(loop)
    window = MainWindow()
    window.show()
    loop.run_forever(sys.exit(app.exec_()))
1

Thanks oetzi. This works better, but still drags the UI down somewhat. I did some research, and found the following, for those who are interested.

The difficulty with showing a responsive user-interface while running a computationally heavy process using threading, stems from the fact in this case one combines a so-called IO-bound thread (i.e. the GUI), with a CPU-bound thread (i.e. the computation). For a IO-bound process, the time it takes to complete is defined by the fact that the thread has to wait on input or output (e.g. a user clicking on things, or a timer). By contrast, the time required to finish a CPU-bound process is limited by the power of the processing unit performing the process.

In principle, mixing these types of threads in Python should not be a problem. Although the GIL enforces that only one thread is running at a single instance, the operating system in fact splits the processes up into smaller instructions, and switches between them. If a thread is running, it has the GIL and executes some of its instructions. After a fixed amount of time, it needs to release the GIL. Once released, the GIL can schedule activate any other 'runnable' thread - including the one that was just released.

The problem however, is with the scheduling of these threads. Here things become a bit fuzzy for me, but basically what happens is that the CPU-bound thread seems to dominate this selection, from what I could gather due to a process called the "convey effect". Hence, the erratic and unpredictable behavior of a Qt GUI when running a CPU-bound thread in the background.

I found some interesting reading material on this:

So... this is very nice and all, how do we fix this?

In the end, I managed to get what I want using multiprocessing. This allows you to actually run a process parallel to the GUI, instead in sequential fashion. This ensures the GUI stays as responsive as it would be without the CPU-bound process in the background.

Multiprocessing has a lot of difficulties of its own, for example the fact that sending information back and forth between processes is done by sending pickled objects across a pipeline. However, the end-result is really superior in my case.

Below I put a code snippet, showing my solution. It contains a class called ProgressDialog, which provides an easy API for setting this up with your own CPU-bound process.

"""Contains class for executing a long running process (LRP) in a separate
process, while showing a progress bar"""

import multiprocessing as mp

from PySide2 import QtCore
from PySide2.QtCore import Qt
import PySide2.QtWidgets as QtWidgets


class ProgressDialog(QtWidgets.QDialog):
    """Dialog which performs a operation in a separate process, shows a
    progress bar, and returns the result of the operation

    Parameters
    ----
    title: str
        Title of the dialog
    operation: callable
        Function of the form f(conn, *args) that will be run
    args: tuple
        Additional arguments for operation
    parent: QWidget
        Parent widget

    Returns
    ----
    result: int
        The result is an integer. A 0 represents successful completion, or
        cancellation by the user. Negative numbers represent errors. -999
        is reserved for any unforeseen uncaught error in the operation.

    Examples
    ----
    The function passed as the operation parameter should be of the form
    ``f(conn, *args)``. The conn argument is a Connection object, used to
    communicate the progress of the operation to the GUI process. The
    operation can pass its progress with a number between 0 and 100, using
    ``conn.send(i)``. Once the process is finished, it should send 101.
    Error handling is done by passing negative numbers.

    >>> def some_function(conn, *args):
    >>>     conn.send(0)
    >>>     a = 0
    >>>     try:
    >>>         for i in range(100):
    >>>                 a += 1
    >>>                 conn.send(i + 1)  # Send progress
    >>>     except Exception:
    >>>         conn.send(-1)  # Send error code
    >>>     else:
    >>>         conn.send(101)  # Send successful completion code

    Now we can use an instance of the ProgressDialog class within any 
    QtWidget to execute the operation in a separate process, show a progress 
    bar, and print the error code:

    >>> progress_dialog = ProgressDialog("Running...", some_function, self)
    >>> progress_dialog.finished.connect(lambda err_code: print(err_code))
    >>> progress_dialog.open()
    """

    def __init__(self, title, operation, args=(), parent=None):
        super().__init__(parent, Qt.WindowCloseButtonHint)
        self.setWindowTitle(title)
        self.progress_bar = QtWidgets.QProgressBar(self)
        self.progress_bar.setValue(0)
        layout = QtWidgets.QHBoxLayout()
        layout.addWidget(self.progress_bar)
        self.setLayout(layout)

        # Create connection pipeline
        self.parent_conn, self.child_conn = mp.Pipe()

        # Create process
        args = (self.child_conn, *args)
        self.process = mp.Process(target=operation, args=args)

        # Create status emitter
        self.progress_emitter = ProgressEmitter(self.parent_conn, self.process)
        self.progress_emitter.signals.progress.connect(self.slot_update_progress)
        self.thread_pool = QtCore.QThreadPool()

    def slot_update_progress(self, i):
        if i < 0:
            self.done(i)
        elif i == 101:
            self.done(0)
        else:
            self.progress_bar.setValue(i)

    def open(self):
        super().open()
        self.process.start()
        self.thread_pool.start(self.progress_emitter)

    def closeEvent(self, *args):
        self.progress_emitter.running = False
        self.process.terminate()
        super().closeEvent(*args)


class ProgressEmitter(QtCore.QRunnable):
    """Listens to status of process"""

    class ProgressSignals(QtCore.QObject):
        progress = QtCore.Signal(int)

    def __init__(self, conn, process):
        super().__init__()
        self.conn = conn
        self.process = process
        self.signals = ProgressEmitter.ProgressSignals()
        self.running = True

    def run(self):
        while self.running:
            if self.conn.poll():
                progress = self.conn.recv()
                self.signals.progress.emit(progress)
                if progress < 0 or progress == 101:
                    self.running = False
            elif not self.process.is_alive():
                self.signals.progress.emit(-999)
                self.running = False
3
  • this doesnt work or intermittently fails when ui threads block ProgressEmitter. There should be a low-level inter-process communication such as asyncqt/quamash does. Beside this when ui includes multiple processes running in different child pages its likely going to fail
    – oetzi
    Jan 6 '20 at 17:16
  • Hmm... why would the UI thread block the thread running ProgressEmitter? It runs in a separate thread... Yeah, I guess multiprocessing has a lot of complexities of its own, but if you just want to run one heavy process - which is the use case I built this for - it works well. The asynqt solution still wasn't giving me the responsiveness I was looking for, or have seen in other applications that show progress bars when performing some heavy background stuff (e.g. Microsoft Word). Jan 7 '20 at 7:08
  • you will need a parent thread/resource controller in your application to run application specific task with ui threads. and way you implemented is not a best practice. it doesn't mean that it wont work but as i tried explaining with my sample it will crash intermittently when any UI thread is in race condition with the background tasks you are running on any resource.
    – oetzi
    Jan 7 '20 at 14:09

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