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According to https://html.spec.whatwg.org/multipage/sections.html#the-article-element a user-submitted comment on a blog post could be an <article> but the same page explains that "A section forms part of something else. An article is its own thing."

By own thing I understand that what is inside the block will make sense without additional information. But this is not the case for the comments on this example blog post because I need the article's information to understand which tennis match the users are talking about.

Am I therefore right in saying that <section> should replace <article> for the comments in the last <section>?

<article>
    <header>
        <h1>Roger Federer vs Novak Djokovic: Wimbledon 2019 Final</h1>
    </header>

    <section>
        <h3>First Set</h3>
    </section>

    <section>
        <h3>Second Set</h3>
    </section>

    <section>
        <article itemprop="comment" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/UserComments" id="c1">
            <p>Posted by: <span itemprop="creator" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Person"> <span itemprop="name">Jane Doe</span></span></p>

            <p>I cannot believe he missed those two match points!</p>
        </article>   

        <article itemprop="comment" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/UserComments" id="c2">
            <p>Posted by: <span itemprop="creator" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Person"> <span itemprop="name">John Doe</span></span></p>

            <p>The last point of the third game in set 1 was epic!</p>          
        </article>      
    </section>
</article>
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  • Try reading W3C Recommendations and form your conclusion based on your app/ content: w3.org/TR/html52/sections.html#the-section-element and w3.org/TR/html52/sections.html#the-article-element Dec 29, 2019 at 3:07
  • This adds some more confusion unfortunately because whereas WHATWG is using <article> for comments in the section "Here is that same blog post, but showing some of the comments:", the W3C is using <li> for the same section which in my opinion makes more sense. But according to w3.org/blog/news/archives/7753 "WHATWG maintains the HTML and DOM Living Standards" so should WHATWG be used as a rule of thumb?
    – WPRookie82
    Dec 29, 2019 at 7:40
  • <article> has a definite intention: if a content can stand on its own, it can be treated as an article. A <section> has a more general intention however. Maybe you can find this and this helpful. Dec 29, 2019 at 21:12
  • I'm incidentally aware of both links especially the flow chart which is ultimately why I believe that a comment on a blog almost always cannot stand on its own; "I cannot believe he missed those two match points!" means absolutely nothing without the original post so in my opinion <article> in this case would be the wrong element to use. But then someone might argue that if a user decides to submit his own match review as a comment on the blog post then that's a piece of information which can live on its own because it doesn't require the blog post to be understood. Hence my confusion.
    – WPRookie82
    Dec 30, 2019 at 6:04
  • My personal opinion is that it really depends on how YOU as the author of your web content decides on whether your content can stand on its own. A comment that says "I cannot believe he missed those two match points!" can stand on its own if it also includes a link or some other info that gives it further context. In this case, the usage of either <article> or <section> is up to you, based on how you'd like your content to be treated. Again, that's my opinion. Dec 30, 2019 at 7:15

1 Answer 1

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My Preference 1:

<body>
  <main>
    <article>
      "tweet" or "article" or "blog post" or "forum post" content goes here...
      <section class="comments">
        <h1>Comments</h1>
        <ol>
          <li>
            <div class="comment">
              comment goes here...  
            </div>
          </li>
          <li>    
            <div class="comment">
              comment goes here...
            </div>
          </li>
          ....... more comments
        </ol>
      </section>
    </article>      
  </main>
</body>

In my above implementation, comments are nested within an article element because they are directly related to the content of the tweet, article, blog post, or forum post. However, I further group them within a section element for clear organization and visual separation. Now, wrapping each comment in an article element would mean each comment is distributable independently and still self-contained, which is not accurate as each comment is related to the topic of the tweet, article, blog post, or forum post. So, I wrapped each comment within the div element.

So, the above given HTML5 structure aligns the best according to the semantic meaning.

My Preference 2:

If you think the comments are not part of the tweet, article, blog post, or forum post, then the following HTML5 structure is also my other preference:

<body>
  <main>
    <article>
      "tweet" or "article" or "blog post" or "forum post" content goes here... 
    </article>
    <section class="comments">
      <h1>Comments</h1>
      <ol>
        <li>
          <div class="comment">
            comment goes here...  
          </div>
        </li>
        <li>    
          <div class="comment">
            comment goes here...
          </div>
        </li>
        ....... more comments
      </ol> 
    </section>
  </main>
</body>

This HTML5 structure also aligns well with semantic meaning.

My Preference 3:

If you think the tweet, article, blog post, or forum post is the only main content of the particular webpage, then consider the following HTML5 structure:

<body>
  <main>
    <article>
      "tweet" or "article" or "blog post" or "forum post" content goes here... 
    </article>
  </main>  
  <section class="comments">
    <h1>Comments</h1>
    <ol>
      <li>
        <div class="comment">
          comment goes here...  
        </div>
      </li>
      <li>    
        <div class="comment">
          comment goes here...
        </div>
      </li>
      ....... more comments
    </ol> 
  </section>
</body>

I hope this helps.

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