116

I am writing a Stored procedure in sql server 2008 I need to check if a table exist in the DB, if it doesn't then I need to create it.

How do I do it?

  • 1
    Related, if not duplicate: Check if table exists in SQL Server. – user456814 Oct 21 '15 at 10:03
  • 1
    This is a great question that everyone working with SQL Server will ask eventually. It's sad that SQL Server doesn't have the friendly Oracle style CREATE OR REPLACE – Davos Nov 20 '15 at 2:26
  • 1
    For MySQL you can use CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS ... – John Henckel Jun 26 '17 at 23:58
137

Something like this

IF  NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.objects 
WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[YourTable]') AND type in (N'U'))

BEGIN
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[YourTable](
    ....
    ....
    ....
) 

END
  • respectfully consider a few changes (for the sake of the execution plan) using an indexed field instead of * (object_id is the numeric field commonly refered to in this table) use type = 'U' instead of type in (N'U') (the column _type is of type char using Nchar causes an implicit conversion which often causes issues with the cardinality estimator) if (not exists (select object_id from sys.objects where object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[client_tgi_g67_period_list]') and type = 'U')) – yeOldeDataSmythe Apr 29 at 18:46
144

Just for contrast, I like using the object_id function as shown below. It's a bit easier to read, and you don't have to worry about sys.objects vs. sysobjects vs. sys.all_objects vs. sys.tables. Basic form:

IF object_id('MyTable') is not null
    PRINT 'Present!'
ELSE
    PRINT 'Not accounted for'

Of course this will show as "Present" if there is any object present with that name. If you want to check just tables, you'd need:

IF object_id('MyTable', 'U') is not null
    PRINT 'Present!'
ELSE
    PRINT 'Not accounted for'

It works for temp tables as well:

IF object_id('tempdb.dbo.#MyTable') is not null
    PRINT 'Present!'
ELSE
    PRINT 'Not accounted for'
  • 5
    OBJECT_ID() reference: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190328.aspx – gonsalu May 10 '11 at 16:16
  • 2
    I usually see the other method used (checking the sys tables) but this seems ore legible and compact. is there any reason not to prefer this method over the accepted answer? (Such as compatibility issues with SQL migration to different DB providers, speed, etc)? – jedd.ahyoung Jul 7 '14 at 13:36
12

Let us create a sample database with a table by the below script:

CREATE DATABASE Test
GO
USE Test
GO
CREATE TABLE dbo.tblTest (Id INT, Name NVARCHAR(50))

Approach 1: Using INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES view

We can write a query like below to check if a tblTest Table exists in the current database.

IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_NAME = N'tblTest')
BEGIN
  PRINT 'Table Exists'
END

The above query checks the existence of the tblTest table across all the schemas in the current database. Instead of this if you want to check the existence of the Table in a specified Schema and the Specified Database then we can write the above query as below:

IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM Test.INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES WHERE TABLE_SCHEMA = N'dbo'  AND TABLE_NAME = N'tblTest')
BEGIN
  PRINT 'Table Exists'
END

Pros of this Approach: INFORMATION_SCHEMA views are portable across different RDBMS systems, so porting to different RDBMS doesn’t require any change.

Approach 2: Using OBJECT_ID() function

We can use OBJECT_ID() function like below to check if a tblTest Table exists in the current database.

IF OBJECT_ID(N'dbo.tblTest', N'U') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
  PRINT 'Table Exists'
END

Specifying the Database Name and Schema Name parts for the Table Name is optional. But specifying Database Name and Schema Name provides an option to check the existence of the table in the specified database and within a specified schema, instead of checking in the current database across all the schemas. The below query shows that even though the current database is MASTER database, we can check the existence of the tblTest table in the dbo schema in the Test database.

USE MASTER
GO
IF OBJECT_ID(N'Test.dbo.tblTest', N'U') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
  PRINT 'Table Exists'
END

Pros: Easy to remember. One other notable point to mention about OBJECT_ID() function is: it provides an option to check the existence of the Temporary Table which is created in the current connection context. All other Approaches checks the existence of the Temporary Table created across all the connections context instead of just the current connection context. Below query shows how to check the existence of a Temporary Table using OBJECT_ID() function:

CREATE TABLE #TempTable(ID INT)
GO
IF OBJECT_ID(N'TempDB.dbo.#TempTable', N'U') IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
  PRINT 'Table Exists'
END
GO

Approach 3: Using sys.Objects Catalog View

We can use the Sys.Objects catalog view to check the existence of the Table as shown below:

IF EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM sys.Objects WHERE  Object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'dbo.tblTest') AND Type = N'U')
BEGIN
  PRINT 'Table Exists'
END

Approach 4: Using sys.Tables Catalog View

We can use the Sys.Tables catalog view to check the existence of the Table as shown below:

IF EXISTS(SELECT 1 FROM sys.Tables WHERE  Name = N'tblTest' AND Type = N'U')
BEGIN
  PRINT 'Table Exists'
END

Sys.Tables catalog view inherits the rows from the Sys.Objects catalog view, Sys.objects catalog view is referred to as base view where as sys.Tables is referred to as derived view. Sys.Tables will return the rows only for the Table objects whereas Sys.Object view apart from returning the rows for table objects, it returns rows for the objects like: stored procedure, views etc.

Approach 5: Avoid Using sys.sysobjects System table

We should avoid using sys.sysobjects System Table directly, direct access to it will be deprecated in some future versions of the Sql Server. As per [Microsoft BOL][1] link, Microsoft is suggesting to use the catalog views sys.objects/sys.tables instead of sys.sysobjects system table directly.

IF EXISTS(SELECT name FROM sys.sysobjects WHERE Name = N'tblTest' AND xtype = N'U')
BEGIN
  PRINT 'Table Exists'
END

Reference: http://sqlhints.com/2014/04/13/how-to-check-if-a-table-exists-in-sql-server/

  • Important to note that this answer provides which approach needs the database to be specified and which do not. This is extremely valuable and for scripts that run to setup and update an operational database when there are multiple of the same database running on the same instance, this is the key! Great information. – Nelda.techspiress Dec 29 '17 at 16:43
11

EDITED

You can look into sys.tables for checking existence desired table:

IF  NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.tables
WHERE name = N'YourTable' AND type = 'U')

BEGIN
CREATE TABLE [SchemaName].[YourTable](
    ....
    ....
    ....
) 

END
3
IF (EXISTS (SELECT * 
                 FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES 
                 WHERE  TABLE_NAME = 'd020915'))
BEGIN
  declare @result int
  set @result=1
  select @result as result
END
0

Try the following statement to check for existence of a table in the database:

If not exists (select name from sysobjects where name = 'tablename')

You may create the table inside the if block.

  • 3
    While that syntax will work, sysobjects is a compatibility view that exists only to avoid breaking older code. My suggestion would be to use system catalog views (e.g. sys.objects, sys.tables) for code that will only target SQL Server 2008 instances, and information schema views (e.g. information_schema.tables) for code that needs to be portable. You can find more information on the different views here: Querying the SQL Server System Catalog – ajk May 10 '11 at 15:44
-2

If I am not wrong, this should work:

    if not exists (Select 1 from tableName)
create table ...
  • 2
    what if the table exists but is empty,,this will be true in that case – SQLMenace May 10 '11 at 14:58
  • @SQLMeance Oh ok, I understand from your answer that you are checking for the type 'U' in sys.objects, Could you help me understand, why you recommend this? and can a table exist anywhere else ? Thank you in advance – RaM May 10 '11 at 15:01
  • U = User table, see here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190324.aspx – SQLMenace May 10 '11 at 15:37

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