48

Having read this question on HNQ, I went on to read about Nullable Reference Types in C# 8, and made some experiments.

I'm very aware that 9 times out of 10, or even more often, when someone says "I found a compiler bug!" this is actually by design, and their own misunderstanding. And since I started to look into this feature only today, clearly I do not have very good understanding of it. With this out of the way, lets look at this code:

#nullable enable
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var s = "";
        var b = s == null; // If you comment this line out, the warning on the line below disappears
        var i = s.Length; // warning CS8602: Dereference of a possibly null reference
    }
}

After reading the documentation I linked to above, I would expect the s == null line to give me a warning—after all s is clearly non-nullable, so comparing it to null does not make sense.

Instead, I'm getting a warning on the next line, and the warning says that s is possible a null reference, even though, for a human, it's obvious it is not.

More over, the warning is not displayed if we do not compare s to null.

I did some Googling and I hit a GitHub issue, which turned out to be about something else entirely, but in the process I had a conversation with a contributor that gave some more insight in this behaviour (e.g. "Null checks are often a useful way of telling the compiler to reset its prior inference about a variable's nullability."). This still left me with the main question unanswered, however.

Rather than creating a new GitHub issue, and potentially taking up the time of the incredibly busy project contributors, I'm putting this out to the community.

Could you please explain me what's going on and why? In particular, why no warnings are generated on the s == null line, and why do we have CS8602 when it does not seem like a null reference is possible here? If nullability inference is not bullet-proof, as the linked GitHub thread suggests, how can it go wrong? What would be some examples of that?

18
  • It seems that the compiler itself sets behavior that at this point the variable "s" could be null. Anyway, if I ever use strings or objects then there should be always a check before you call a function. "s?.Length" should do the trick and the warning itself should dissapear.
    – chg
    Dec 30, 2019 at 1:07
  • 1
    @chg, there should be no need for ? because s is not nullable. It does not become nullable, simply because we were silly enough to compare it with null. Dec 30, 2019 at 1:09
  • I was following an earlier question (sorry, can't find it) where it was posited that if you add a check that a value is null, then the compiler takes that as 'hint' that the value might be null, even if that is demonstrably not the case.
    – stuartd
    Dec 30, 2019 at 1:10
  • 1
    @stuartd, yep, that's what it seems it is. So now the question is: why is this useful? Dec 30, 2019 at 1:10
  • 1
    @chg, well, that's what I say in the question body, is not it? Dec 30, 2019 at 1:36

2 Answers 2

18

This is effectively a duplicate of the answer that @stuartd linked, so I'm not going to go into super deep details here. But the root of the matter is that this is neither a language bug nor a compiler bug, but it's intended behavior exactly as implemented. We track the null state of a variable. When you initially declare the variable, that state is NotNull because you explicitly initialize it with a value that is not null. But we don't track where that NotNull came from. This, for example, is effectively equivalent code:

#nullable enable
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        M("");
    }
    static void M(string s)
    {
        var b = s == null;
        var i = s.Length; // warning CS8602: Dereference of a possibly null reference
    }
}

In both cases, you explicitly test s for null. We take this as input to the flow analysis, just as Mads answered in this question: https://stackoverflow.com/a/59328672/2672518. In that answer, the result is that you get a warning on the return. In this case, the answer is that you get a warning that you dereferenced a possibly null reference.

It does not become nullable, simply because we were silly enough to compare it with null.

Yep, it actually does. To the compiler. As humans, we can look at this code and obviously understand that it cannot throw a null reference exception. But the way the nullable flow analysis is implemented in the compiler, it cannot. We did discuss some amount of improvements to this analysis where we add additional states based on where the value came from, but we decided that this added a great deal of complexity to the implementation for not a great deal of gain, because the only places where this would be useful is for cases like this, where the user initializes a variable with a new or a constant value and then checks it for null anyway.

5
  • Thank you. This mostly addresses similarities with the other question, I'd like to address differences more. For example, why s == null does not produce a warning? Dec 31, 2019 at 5:37
  • Also I just realized that with #nullable enable; string s = "";s = null; compiles and works (it still does produce a warning) what are benefits, of the implementation that allows assigning null to a "non-nullable reference" in enabled null annotation context? Dec 31, 2019 at 5:40
  • Mad's answer focuse on the fact that "[compiler] does not track the relationship between the state of separate variables" we do not have separate variables in this example, so I have trouble applying the rest of Mad's answer to this case. Dec 31, 2019 at 5:42
  • It goes without saying, but remeber, I'm here not to critique, but to learn. I've been using C# from the time it first came out in 2001. Even though I'm not new to the language, the way the compiler behaves was surprising to me. The goal of this question is to lean the rationale why this behaviour is useful for humans. Dec 31, 2019 at 5:47
  • There are valid reasons to check s == null. Perhaps, for example, you're in a public method, and you want to do parameter validation. Or, perhaps you're using a library that annotated incorrectly, and until they fix that bug you have to deal with null where it wasn't declared. In either of those cases, if we warned, it would be a bad experience. As for allowing assignment: local variable annotations are just for reading. They don't affect the runtime at all. In fact, we put all those warnings in a single error code so that you can turn them off if you want to to reduce code churn.
    – 333fred
    Dec 31, 2019 at 23:09
9

If nullability inference is not bullet-proof, [..] how can it go wrong?

I happily adopted the nullable references of C#8 as soon as they were available. As I was used to use the [NotNull] (etc.) notation of ReSharper, I did notice some differences between the two.

The C# compiler can be fooled, but it tends to err on the side of caution (usually, not always).

As a reference for future visitors, these are the scenarios I saw the compiler being pretty confused about (I assume all these cases are by design):

  • Null forgiving null. Often used to avoid the dereference warning, but keeping the object non-nullable. It looks like wanting to keep your foot in two shoes.
    string s = null!; //No warning

  • Surface analysis. In opposition to ReSharper (that does it using code annotation), the C# compiler does still not support a full range of attributes to handle the nullable references.
    void DoSomethingWith(string? s)
    {    
        ThrowIfNull(s);
        var split = s.Split(' '); //Dereference warning
    }

It does, though, allow to use some construct to check for nullability that also get rid of the warning:

    public static void DoSomethingWith(string? s)
    {
        Debug.Assert(s != null, nameof(s) + " != null");
        var split = s.Split(' ');  //No warning
    }

or (still pretty cool) attributes (find them all here):

    public static bool IsNullOrEmpty([NotNullWhen(false)] string? value)
    {
        ...
    }

  • Susceptible code analysis. This is what you brought to light. The compiler has to make assumptions in order to work and sometimes they might seem counter-intuitive (for humans, at least).
    void DoSomethingWith(string s)
    {    
        var b = s == null;
        var i = s.Length; // Dereference warning
    }

  • Troubles with generics. Asked here and explained very well here (same article as before, paragraph "The issue with T?"). Generics are complicated as they have to make both references and values happy. The main difference is that while string? is just a string, int? becomes a Nullable<int> and forces the compiler to handle them in substantially different ways. Also here, the compiler is choosing the safe path, forcing you to specify what you are expecting:
    public interface IResult<out T> : IResult
    {
        T? Data { get; } //Warning/Error: A nullable type parameter must be known to be a value type or non-nullable reference type.
    }

Solved giving constrains:

    public interface IResult<out T> : IResult where T : class { T? Data { get; }}
    public interface IResult<T> : IResult where T : struct { T? Data { get; }}

But if we do not use constraints and remove the '?' from Data, we are still able to put null values in it using the 'default' keyword:

    [Pure]
    public static Result<T> Failure(string description, T data = default)
        => new Result<T>(ResultOutcome.Failure, data, description); 
        // data here is definitely null. No warning though.

The last one seems the trickier to me, as it does allow to write unsafe code.

Hope this helps someone.

6
  • 1
    I'd suggest giving the docs on nullable attributes a read: learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/nullable-attributes. They'll solve some of your issues, particularly with the surface analysis section and generics.
    – 333fred
    Dec 31, 2019 at 23:17
  • Thanks for the link @333fred. Even though there are attributes you can play with, an attribute that solve the problem I posted (something that tells me that ThrowIfNull(s); is assuring me that s is not null), doesn't exist. Also the article explains how to handler non-nullable generics, while I was showing how you can "fool" the compiler, having a null value but no warning about it. Jan 2, 2020 at 9:08
  • Actually, the attribute does exist. I filed a bug on the docs to add it. You're looking for DoesNotReturnIf(bool).
    – 333fred
    Jan 7, 2020 at 23:31
  • @333fred actually I'm looking for something more like DoesNotReturnIfNull(nullable). Jan 8, 2020 at 7:57
  • 1
    "Hope this helps someone" – it does ;) also coming from Resharper's attributes. I also had to change some code because the C# 8 attributes can't cover all cases yet (easiest example is that while there is a NotNullIfNotNull there is no NullIfNotNull, or other variations of it).
    – enzi
    Oct 16, 2020 at 15:07

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