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I am working on a survey application with Asp.Net MVC.

I have a page named Index.cshtml which has a question table and a 'Add New' button.Once button clicked, a popup is opened with jQuery. I am calling a view from controller to fill jQuery dialog named as AddOrEdit.cshtml (child page). I am adding new question and options. Question is a textfield and its options are added in editable table. Once clicked submit button, Submit form event (save or update) is fired. My Question and its Options class has a one-to-many relatonship. EF6 tries to save parent entities with its child entities. But I want to save childs after insertion of parents not the same time. How can I handle this problem.

I am using DB First approach. What is the best practice?

Question.cs

namespace MerinosSurvey.Models
{
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public partial class Questions
{
    [System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Usage", "CA2214:DoNotCallOverridableMethodsInConstructors")]
    public Questions()
    {
        this.Responses = new HashSet<Responses>();
        this.Options = new HashSet<Options>();
    }

    public int QuestionId { get; set; }
    public string QuestionName { get; set; }
    public int QuestionTypeId { get; set; }
    public System.DateTime CreatedDate { get; set; }
    public int CreatedUserId { get; set; }
    public bool IsActive { get; set; }
    public bool Status { get; set; }
    public System.DateTime UpdatedDate { get; set; }

    [System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Usage", "CA2227:CollectionPropertiesShouldBeReadOnly")]
    public virtual ICollection<Responses> Responses { get; set; }
    [System.Diagnostics.CodeAnalysis.SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Usage", "CA2227:CollectionPropertiesShouldBeReadOnly")]
    public virtual ICollection<Options> Options { get; set; }
}
}

Option.cs

namespace MerinosSurvey.Models
{
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

public partial class Options
{
    public int OptionId { get; set; }
    public string OptionName { get; set; }
    public int QuestionId { get; set; }
    public System.DateTime CreatedDate { get; set; }
    public System.DateTime UpdatedDate { get; set; }
    public bool IsActive { get; set; }
    public bool Status { get; set; }

    public virtual Questions Questions { get; set; }
}
}

QuestionController.cs - AddOrEdit Action

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult AddOrEdit(Questions question)
    {
        if (question != null)
        {
            using (MerinosSurveyEntities db = new MerinosSurveyEntities())
            {
                Questions questionComing = db.Questions.FirstOrDefault(x => x.QuestionId == question.QuestionId);
                if (questionComing != null)
                {
                    //Update
                    questionComing.QuestionName = question.QuestionName;
                    questionComing.Status = true;
                    questionComing.IsActive = true;
                    questionComing.UpdatedDate = DateTime.Now;
                    db.Questions.Attach(questionComing);
                    db.Entry(questionComing).State = EntityState.Modified;
                    question.QuestionId = questionComing.QuestionId;
                    db.SaveChanges();
                }
                else
                {
                    //New Question
                    question.Status = true;
                    question.IsActive = true;
                    question.UpdatedDate = DateTime.Now;
                    question.CreatedDate = DateTime.Now;
                    db.Questions.Attach(question);
                    db.Entry(question).State = EntityState.Added;
                    db.SaveChanges();
                    question.QuestionId = question.QuestionId;
                }

                List<Options> options = question.Options.ToList();
                List<Options> existingOptions = new List<Options>(db.Options.Where(x =>
                    x.Status && x.IsActive && x.QuestionId == question.QuestionId));

                foreach (Options existingOption in existingOptions)
                {
                    Options optionUpdated = options.FirstOrDefault(x => x.OptionId == existingOption.OptionId);
                    if (optionUpdated != null)
                    {
                        //Update
                        existingOption.UpdatedDate = DateTime.Now;
                        existingOption.OptionName = optionUpdated.OptionName;
                        existingOption.IsActive = true;
                        existingOption.Status = true;
                        db.Options.Attach(existingOption);
                        db.Entry(existingOption).State = EntityState.Modified;
                        db.SaveChanges();
                        options.RemoveAll(x => x.OptionId == existingOption.OptionId);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        //Delete
                        existingOption.Status = false;
                        existingOption.UpdatedDate = DateTime.Now;
                        db.Options.Attach(existingOption);
                        db.Entry(existingOption).State = EntityState.Modified;
                        db.SaveChanges();
                    }
                }

                foreach (Options optionNew in options)
                {
                    optionNew.IsActive = true;
                    optionNew.Status = true;
                    optionNew.CreatedDate = DateTime.Now;
                    optionNew.UpdatedDate = DateTime.Now;
                    optionNew.QuestionId = question.QuestionId;
                    db.Options.Add(optionNew);
                    db.SaveChanges();
                }

                return Json(new { success = true, message = "Soru başarılı bir şekilde güncellendi." 
  },
                    JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
            }
        }

        return Json(new { success = true, message = "Bir problem oluştu." },
            JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    }
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  • Personally, for any object I dont want to update, I would set db.Entry(child).State = EntityState.Detached – Minijack Dec 30 '19 at 5:53
  • As a developer I would like to register child objects myself. So first I save the parenth, then I want to save child. But EF says you don't interfere with anything and I'll do it all, it bothers me. Is this the same for you? And does this method work without problems? – user6172721 Dec 30 '19 at 6:14
  • when I add if($(form).valid()). Both jquery validation and bootstrap validation works at the same time. – user6172721 Dec 30 '19 at 11:16
  • I recommend you let EF do the work for you, but if that really bothers you as Minjack mentioned you could set newly added child states to Detached and then after that you can use ChangeTracker to get detached child entities and add them manually – Asım Gündüz Jan 1 at 19:23
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Your approach is very deliberate, but prone to problems. With EF, the DbContext acts much like a unit of work and SaveChanges should only ever be called once. With something like a related hierarchy where you have a Question with Options, you update and save the question, but then what happens if there is a problem with saving one of the options? You would be committing changes partially and leaving data in an incomplete, inaccurate state.

It's also a LOT of boilerplate code, some of it such as explicitly setting a tracked entity's state to Modified is completely unnecessary. The operation could be revised and simplified down to something like:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult AddOrEdit(Questions question)
{
    if (question == null) // Assert and fail. Avoids nesting.
        return Json(new { success = true, message = "Bir problem oluştu." },
            JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);

    using (MerinosSurveyEntities db = new MerinosSurveyEntities())
    {
        Questions questionComing = db.Questions.Include(x => x.Options).SingleOrDefault(x => x.QuestionId == question.QuestionId); // Prefetch our options...
        if (questionComing != null)
        {   //Update
            questionComing.QuestionName = question.QuestionName;
            questionComing.Status = true;
            questionComing.IsActive = true;
            questionComing.UpdatedDate = DateTime.Now;
            // db.Questions.Attach(questionComing); -- not needed, already tracked
            // db.Entry(questionComing).State = EntityState.Modified; - Not needed
            // question.QuestionId = questionComing.QuestionId; -- Redundant. The ID matches, we loaded based on it.
            // db.SaveChanges(); -- No save yet.

            // Handle options here... There are probably optimizations that can be added.
            var activeOptionIds = question.Options.Where(x => x.Status && s.IsActive).Select(x => x.OptionId).ToList();
            foreach(var option in question.Options.Where(x => activeOptionIds.Contains(x.OptionId))
            {
                var existingOption = questionComing.Options.SingleOrDefault(x => x.OptionId == option.OptionId);
                if(existingOption != null)
                { // Update
                    existingOption.UpdatedDate = DateTime.Now;
                    existingOption.OptionName = optionUpdated.OptionName;
                    existingOption.IsActive = true;
                    existingOption.Status = true;
                }
                else
                { // New
                    questionComing.Options.Add(option); // Provided we trust the data coming in. Otherwise new up an option and copy over values.
                }
            }

            var removedOptions = questionComing.Options.Where(x => !activeOptionIds.Contains(x.OptionId).ToList();
            foreach(var option in removedOptions)
            {
                option.Status = option.IsActive = false;
                option.UpdatedDate = DateTime.Now;
            } 
        }
        else
        {   //New Question
            // Dangerous to trust the Question coming in. Better to validate and copy values to a new Question to add...
            question.Status = true;
            question.IsActive = true;
            question.UpdatedDate = question.CreatedDate = DateTime.Now;

            // db.Questions.Attach(question); -- Add it...
            // db.Entry(question).State = EntityState.Added; 
            // question.QuestionId = question.QuestionId; -- Does nothing...
            db.Questions.Add(question); // This will append all Options as well.
        }

        // Now, after all changes are in, Save.
        db.SaveChanges();
        return Json(new { success = true, message = "Soru başarılı bir şekilde güncellendi." },JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
    } // end using.

}

This I would further break down into private methods to handle the add vs. update. While this doesn't answer how you can update a parent without it's children, it should demonstrate why you should leverage the capabilities of EF to ensure that children are updated with their parents properly. SaveChanges should only ever be called one time within the lifetime scope of a DbContext so that it ensures that all related changes are either committed or rolled back in the event of a failure. EF manages relationships between entities that it is told to track so you can add an entity with new children. Where you need to be careful is with references, such as if you have an existing QuestionType entity associated with a new question. In these scenarios you always want to load the entity within the DbContext scope and use that reference, not a detached reference coming in because EF will treat that as a new entity resulting in duplicate data or duplicate key constraints being hit. It's generally advisable to not pass entities between client and server to avoid issues like this. Attaching or adding entities coming from the client can expose a system to data tampering if not validated properly, and can lead to issues when it comes to referencing existing data.

For instance if you pass in a new question that has a QuestionType reference of "MultipleChoice" (A lookup table of question types) where that is QuestionType ID #1. If you do something like:

db.Questions.Add(question);

"question" was untracked, and all referenced entities are untracked. If you add it, or attach it as a new entity, those referenced entities will be treated as new entities. This would effectively want to Insert a new QuestionType ID #1, leading to a key violation (row already exists) or would insert a new QuestionType ID #12 for example if the QuestionType was configured for incrementing ID. To get around this:

var existingQuestionType = db.QuestionTypes.Single(x => x.QuestionTypeId == question.QuestionType.QuestionTypeId);
question.QuestionType = existingQuestionType; // Points our question type reference at the existing, tracked reference.
db.Questions.Add(question);

question.QuestionType and existingQuestionType would both have an ID of 1 in this example. The difference is that existingQuestionType is tracked/known by the Context where question.QuestionType was an untracked reference. If we added question without the context knowing about the reference, it would treat it like it would a child record of question and want to insert that too. This is probably one of the biggest things that trips people up with EF references and leads to problems and efforts to get more deliberate with related entities, but takes away a lot of the advantages EF can provide. We point our new question reference at the tracked entity so when EF goes to insert the question, it already knows the QuestionType reference as an existing row and everything works as expected.

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