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I'm pretty deep into the development of my Android app, and as I mess around with my audio files a second time to try longer audio clips (1000ms long), I am now getting audio glitches again. Before I was not getting any glitches with 160ms long files.

  • Background: I'm making a metronome, so imagine roughly 100 lines of code in the callback to constantly figure out what audio file to play and for how long.

Without getting into my code, I was just wondering if file size or file type has any impact on performance? I believe I'm using the sample Player rendering class (source) (for Raw file input) which seems to load the audio data of the file each callback. This would Perhaps loading data from a larger array would slow it down? Although, It could also be the new features/logic that I'm adding to the callback.

I know it is talked about frequently about using mp3's and decoding with FFmpeg. Has anyone done any bench-marking between mp3 and raw, and is there any performance advantage to using mp3's, or is it mainly to cut down on your APK size?

Sorry if this has been discussed somewhere, however, I wasn't able to find any articles mentioning this aspect between the two file types. Looking more closely at the rendering class, my gut tells me that file size "shouldn't" be a factor... Otherwise I'll continue to debug and maybe get some systraces in if I can.

  • Try it yourself: ffmpeg -benchmark -i input.mp3 -f null - vs ffmpeg -benchmark -f s16le -channels 2 -sample_rate 44100 -i input.raw -f null - – llogan Dec 30 '19 at 20:17
  • Just to be clear, I don't mean playing raw files with FFmpeg, just with the normal rendering method in the linked Player class that just loads the raw data into a float array. Doing some bench-marking is on my to-do list though. – Matthew Strom Dec 30 '19 at 23:24
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To answer using @llogan's suggestion, here is some benchmarks using the ffmpeg commandline utility:

mp3:

ffmpeg -benchmark -i sound.mp3  -f null -
ffmpeg version 3.4.6-0ubuntu0.18.04.1 Copyright (c) 2000-2019 the FFmpeg developers
  built with gcc 7 (Ubuntu 7.3.0-16ubuntu3)
  configuration: --prefix=/usr --extra-version=0ubuntu0.18.04.1 --toolchain=hardened --libdir=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu --incdir=/usr/include/x86_64-linux-gnu --enable-gpl --disable-stripping --enable-avresample --enable-avisynth --enable-gnutls --enable-ladspa --enable-libass --enable-libbluray --enable-libbs2b --enable-libcaca --enable-libcdio --enable-libflite --enable-libfontconfig --enable-libfreetype --enable-libfribidi --enable-libgme --enable-libgsm --enable-libmp3lame --enable-libmysofa --enable-libopenjpeg --enable-libopenmpt --enable-libopus --enable-libpulse --enable-librubberband --enable-librsvg --enable-libshine --enable-libsnappy --enable-libsoxr --enable-libspeex --enable-libssh --enable-libtheora --enable-libtwolame --enable-libvorbis --enable-libvpx --enable-libwavpack --enable-libwebp --enable-libx265 --enable-libxml2 --enable-libxvid --enable-libzmq --enable-libzvbi --enable-omx --enable-openal --enable-opengl --enable-sdl2 --enable-libdc1394 --enable-libdrm --enable-libiec61883 --enable-chromaprint --enable-frei0r --enable-libopencv --enable-libx264 --enable-shared
  libavutil      55. 78.100 / 55. 78.100
  libavcodec     57.107.100 / 57.107.100
  libavformat    57. 83.100 / 57. 83.100
  libavdevice    57. 10.100 / 57. 10.100
  libavfilter     6.107.100 /  6.107.100
  libavresample   3.  7.  0 /  3.  7.  0
  libswscale      4.  8.100 /  4.  8.100
  libswresample   2.  9.100 /  2.  9.100
  libpostproc    54.  7.100 / 54.  7.100
Input #0, mp3, from 'sound.mp3':
  Duration: 00:00:01.03, start: 0.023021, bitrate: 121 kb/s
    Stream #0:0: Audio: mp3, 48000 Hz, stereo, s16p, 121 kb/s
    Metadata:
      encoder         : LAME3.100
Stream mapping:
  Stream #0:0 -> #0:0 (mp3 (native) -> pcm_s16le (native))
Press [q] to stop, [?] for help
Output #0, null, to 'pipe:':
  Metadata:
    encoder         : Lavf57.83.100
    Stream #0:0: Audio: pcm_s16le, 48000 Hz, stereo, s16, 1536 kb/s
    Metadata:
      encoder         : Lavc57.107.100 pcm_s16le
size=N/A time=00:00:01.00 bitrate=N/A speed=83.6x    
video:0kB audio:188kB subtitle:0kB other streams:0kB global headers:0kB muxing overhead: unknown
bench: utime=0.008s
bench: maxrss=37292kB

raw:

ffmpeg -benchmark -f s16le -channels 2 -sample_rate 44100 -i sound.raw -f null -
ffmpeg version 3.4.6-0ubuntu0.18.04.1 Copyright (c) 2000-2019 the FFmpeg developers
  built with gcc 7 (Ubuntu 7.3.0-16ubuntu3)
  configuration: --prefix=/usr --extra-version=0ubuntu0.18.04.1 --toolchain=hardened --libdir=/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu --incdir=/usr/include/x86_64-linux-gnu --enable-gpl --disable-stripping --enable-avresample --enable-avisynth --enable-gnutls --enable-ladspa --enable-libass --enable-libbluray --enable-libbs2b --enable-libcaca --enable-libcdio --enable-libflite --enable-libfontconfig --enable-libfreetype --enable-libfribidi --enable-libgme --enable-libgsm --enable-libmp3lame --enable-libmysofa --enable-libopenjpeg --enable-libopenmpt --enable-libopus --enable-libpulse --enable-librubberband --enable-librsvg --enable-libshine --enable-libsnappy --enable-libsoxr --enable-libspeex --enable-libssh --enable-libtheora --enable-libtwolame --enable-libvorbis --enable-libvpx --enable-libwavpack --enable-libwebp --enable-libx265 --enable-libxml2 --enable-libxvid --enable-libzmq --enable-libzvbi --enable-omx --enable-openal --enable-opengl --enable-sdl2 --enable-libdc1394 --enable-libdrm --enable-libiec61883 --enable-chromaprint --enable-frei0r --enable-libopencv --enable-libx264 --enable-shared
  libavutil      55. 78.100 / 55. 78.100
  libavcodec     57.107.100 / 57.107.100
  libavformat    57. 83.100 / 57. 83.100
  libavdevice    57. 10.100 / 57. 10.100
  libavfilter     6.107.100 /  6.107.100
  libavresample   3.  7.  0 /  3.  7.  0
  libswscale      4.  8.100 /  4.  8.100
  libswresample   2.  9.100 /  2.  9.100
  libpostproc    54.  7.100 / 54.  7.100
[s16le @ 0x56493de82c00] Estimating duration from bitrate, this may be inaccurate
Guessed Channel Layout for Input Stream #0.0 : stereo
Input #0, s16le, from 'sound.raw':
  Duration: 00:00:01.09, bitrate: 1411 kb/s
    Stream #0:0: Audio: pcm_s16le, 44100 Hz, stereo, s16, 1411 kb/s
Stream mapping:
  Stream #0:0 -> #0:0 (pcm_s16le (native) -> pcm_s16le (native))
Press [q] to stop, [?] for help
Output #0, null, to 'pipe:':
  Metadata:
    encoder         : Lavf57.83.100
    Stream #0:0: Audio: pcm_s16le, 44100 Hz, stereo, s16, 1411 kb/s
    Metadata:
      encoder         : Lavc57.107.100 pcm_s16le
size=N/A time=00:00:01.08 bitrate=N/A speed= 819x    
video:0kB audio:188kB subtitle:0kB other streams:0kB global headers:0kB muxing overhead: unknown
bench: utime=0.001s
bench: maxrss=36752kB

Through these results, (if I'm reading it correctly) it seems .raw beats out .mp3 by about 7ms. In memory consumption, .raw beats .mp3 by 1 MB. If decoded using a 48000 stream rate, .raw beats .mp3 by 2 MB in memory consumption.

Using this data, it seems that using Raw may technically be faster, although mp3's have the advantage of being immensely more compact in file size. So for me, where my file sizes are relatively small (190kB x 9 files), it's not a huge factor. That being said, under 10ms to load a sound file isn't terrible and I don't think it would impact the performance of your app.

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If you're making a metronome app presumably you're just playing a "click" sound which is synchronised to the user's chosen tempo.

If so, my advice would be to store your "click" sound in MP3, decode it into memory when the app starts, then play it at precisely the correct time by monitoring the number of frames which have been requested inside the audio stream callback.

The decode time of the MP3 then becomes irrelevant because you're not doing it in real-time.

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Always RAW PCM will Play faster as compared to any compress mp3 file.

Mp3 file contains - mp3 encoded data - that need to be decoder to Raw PCM and then Played by any player.

RAW PCM file ( uncompressed) are larger in side as compared to mp3 files ( compressed ).

if you are bundling this file with the APK , the size of the APK will change.

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