2

Consider this:

#include <set>

template <typename T, T val>
class sample {
public:
    // Return val for new elements.
    T& at(unsigned i) {
       auto o = _set.insert(val);
       return *o.first;
    }

private:
    std::set<T> _set;
};

class s {
public:
    constexpr s() = default;
};


int main() {
    constexpr s val;
    sample<s, val> o2;
    return 0;
}

gcc -std=c++11 doesn't compile.

non-type.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
non-type.cc:24:18: error: ‘class s’ is not a valid type for a template non-type parameter
     sample<s, val> o2;

As mentioned in the comment, I want new elements of 'set' are initialized to 'val'. As val is constant, it looks reasonable expectation!

Can someone please tell me how I can achieve it?

2 Answers 2

8

It looks like what you want to do is possible, but requires C++20.

From the docs

Until C++20 a "non-type parameter" needs to be one of

- std::nullptr_t (since C++11);
- an integral type;
- a pointer type (to object or to function);
- a pointer to member type (to member object or to member function);
- an enumeration type.

Having a non-type parameter of a custom type seems to not be available at the moment unless you have access to a compiler that already has that feature.

2

A workaround in your example is to accept a reference. Even in C++11, a reference to a static object is a valid non-type template parameter.

template <typename T, T const & val>
class sample {
    // ...
};

// ...

constexpr static s val;
sample<s, val> o2;

Since you intend to work with a constexpr val, making it static appears appropriate too.

4
  • This doesn't work for integral. e.g. sample<unsigend, 0u>. C++ should allow us to use non-type argument without using a variable. e.g. class sample2 { sample <s, s()> o; } Commented Dec 30, 2019 at 8:46
  • @user3689963 - Sure, it requires you to commit to a certain way of working, you'd need a constexpr static auto val = 0u. That's C++ today. Commented Dec 30, 2019 at 8:47
  • >> C++ should allow us to use non-type argument without using a variable. e.g. class sample2 { sample <s, s()> o; } Otherwise every instance of sample with different type will require a new static object!. Commented Dec 30, 2019 at 8:54
  • @user3689963 - Well, we can huff and puff and say what should be, or we can work with what we've got. Commented Dec 30, 2019 at 8:55

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