1

I have a collection of .pdf files which when using pdf-parser.py gives: FlateDecode decompress failed. zlib.error Error -3 while decompressing: incorrect header check. See bellow.

    PDF Comment %PDF-1.4 
    PDF Comment %âãÏÓ
    obj 1 0
     Type: /ExtGState
     Referencing: 
    <<
    /Type/ExtGState
    /SA false
    /SM 0.02
    >>
      <<
        /Type /ExtGState
        /SA false
        /SM 0.02
      >>
    <<
    /Type/ExtGState
    /SA false
    /SM 0.02
    >>
    obj 2 0
     Type: 
     Referencing: 
    [/DeviceRGB]
    [/DeviceRGB]
    obj 3 0
     Type: 
     Referencing: 
     Contains stream
      <<
        /Filter /FlateDecode
        /Length 1136
      >>
     FlateDecode decompress failed. zlib.error Error -3 while decompressing: incorrect header check
...
...
<<
/Producer (tx_pdf 15.0.130.501)
/CreationDate (D:20100309081052Z)
>>

The ZLIB header (as defined in RFC1950) should be:

 CMF |  FLG
0x78 | 0x01 - No Compression/low
0x78 | 0x9C - Default Compression
0x78 | 0xDA - Best Compression 

When examining the files in the 010 Editor the header bytes are instead 0x78 and 0xC3. See image:

010_editor

Does anyone know what kind of compression the bytes may represent? I have tried to google the producer (/Producer (tx_pdf 15.0.130.501)) with no results.

5
  • Cam you share one of those pdfs for analysis?
    – mkl
    Dec 30, 2019 at 9:47
  • The files may have a restricted content. Would it be acceptable if I send it directly to you?
    – stenhh
    Dec 30, 2019 at 10:25
  • You can but then obviously only I can analyze, not all the other readers here. I do know a bit about pdfs but not about pdf-parser.py. Furthermore, I'm not in office this week and only have limited analysis tools until next week. Nonetheless, if you send it, I'd try helping. You find an email address in my stack overflow profile.
    – mkl
    Dec 30, 2019 at 12:35
  • A sample file has been forwarded...
    – stenhh
    Dec 30, 2019 at 13:34
  • I had a first look at your example pdf. Apparently some software processed it as if it were text in some ANSI'ish encoding and wrote that "text" back using UTF-8. This of course scrambles every binary part, e.g. Flate-encoded compressed streams. I have not yet had the opportunity to check whether that happened in a reversible manner (allowing a repair) or not.
    – mkl
    Dec 31, 2019 at 12:18

2 Answers 2

1

Apparently some software processed your PDF as if it were plain text in some ANSI'ish encoding and wrote that "text" back using UTF-8. This of course scrambles every binary part, e.g. Flate-encoded compressed streams.

In your case already the ZLIB header is damaged:

78 C3 9A ...

If you UTF-8 decode that you get the characters

xÚ...

If you encode those chars in some matching Windows ANSI encoding, you get

78 DA ...

This is a Best Compression ZLIB header.

Thus, you should try and undo this "text encoding change". Of course the question remains which encoding exactly to use as there are many very similar encodings of that type, some only differing in a single character.

Another question is whether the software in question did more than merely "change the text encoding" - software treating byte streams as text sometimes do other changes, too, e.g. unify "line endings" to the local platform standard or interpret or remove control characters. Such extra changes most likely would damage a binary file beyond repair.

Some trial and error with the provided file later, it turns out that the ANSI'ish encoding here is the encoding Microsoft's .Net Encoding class knows as windows-1252, and that fortunately the program in question appears not to have otherwise damaged the data.

Thus, using these few lines

byte[] bytes = File.ReadAllBytes(@"rec1254.pdf");
byte[] converted = Encoding.Convert(UTF8Encoding.UTF8, Encoding.GetEncoding("windows-1252"), bytes);
File.WriteAllBytes(@"rec1254-utf8-to-windows-1252.pdf", converted);

I could fix your example file. It should be similarly simple to do this re-encoding in Python.

1
  • First of all - thanks for the effort. Highly appreciated. I have tried to convert your code into python with: #!/usr/bin/python import codecs import sys inFile = sys.argv[1] outFile = sys.argv[2] with codecs.open(inFile, 'r', encoding='utf8') as in_file: lines = in_file.read() # print(lines) #write output file with codecs.open(outFile, 'w', encoding='cp1252') as out_file: out_file.write(lines) Above snippet only complains with "UnicodeEncodeError: 'charmap' codec can't encode character '\x90' in position ..." I have to investigate further.
    – stenhh
    Jan 7, 2020 at 10:59
0

The most likely your PDF is encrypted. Maybe with an empty password if Adobe Reader opens it, but the content is encrypted still.

According to PDF 1.7 spec #7.6 Encryption:

a document can be encrypted to protect its contents from unauthorised access. Encryption applies to all strings and streams in the document's PDF file with the following exceptions:

  • The values for ID entry in the trailer

  • Any strings in Encrypt dictionary

  • Any strings that are inside streams such content streams and compressed objects streams, which themselves are encrypted

This means you need to decrypt your streams before deflating.

2
  • I checked the PDF the OP provided by mail. It was not encrypted. It was mangled by some program treating it like a plain text file.
    – mkl
    Jan 7, 2020 at 18:13
  • I converted the solution that @mkl suggested into a .net snippet which did the trick. After a UTF-8 to windows-1252 conversion all files are readable. Thanks.
    – stenhh
    Jan 8, 2020 at 8:23

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