1

I want to use Fn trait whose return type is impl Trait. For example:

let funcs: [&Fn(&str) -> impl Iterator<Item = &str>] =
    [&str::split_whitespace, &str::split_ascii_whitespace];

However, this code cannot be compiled with the below error message:

`impl Trait` not allowed outside of function and inherent method return types

How should I do?

  • Related doc: github.com/rust-lang/rfcs/blob/master/text/… – Yohei Dec 31 '19 at 3:20
  • I understood that impl trait is now a syntax for unboxed abstraction, thus it cannot be used to abstract different functions, that essentially requires boxed abstraction. – Yohei Dec 31 '19 at 3:34
0

str::split_whitespace and str::split_ascii_whitespace have different return types. You cannot construct an array of varying types. Instead, you can create an array of boxed trait objects. This will perform dynamic dispatch where the specific method called is determined at runtime (instead of static dispatch which is where the specific method version is known at compile-time)

Essentially, the goal is to have all the functions' signatures be:

for<'a> fn(&'a str) -> Box<dyn Iterator<Item=&'a str> + 'a>

which is a function that takes a &str and returns some iterator over &strs determined at runtime.

Now, this is where it starts getting messy and I hope someone can suggest a much better way to do this.

One way to get this to work is by creating wrapper functions around str::split_whitespace and str::split_ascii_whitespace to return a boxed trait instead of their respective SplitWhitespace and SplitAsciiWhitespace structs. I've used a helper macro to simply wrap the returned value from the function call in a Box

macro_rules! boxed_return {
    ($fn_new:ident, $fn:path) => {
        fn $fn_new<'a>(s: &'a str) -> Box<dyn Iterator<Item=&'a str> + 'a> {
            Box::new($fn(s))
        }
    }
}

boxed_return!(split_whitespace_wrapper, str::split_whitespace);
boxed_return!(split_ascii_whitespace_wrapper, str::split_ascii_whitespace);

Then we can simply create the array of splitter functions as follows

let funcs = [split_whitespace_wrapper, split_ascii_whitespace_wrapper];
  • The members of the array need to be trait objects, but they don't need to be boxed - the other answer gives an example. (The inner Box is unavoidable, though, as the signatures of the Fn trait bounds must be the same.) – user4815162342 Dec 30 '19 at 22:13
0

Besides the fact that impl Trait can only be used in limited places syntactically right now, semantically it only means there will be one concrete type in it place. It is not a license for heterogeneous types or dynamic dispatching.

This can be done, but it is becoming unwieldy rather quickly:

type StrFn<'a> = &'a dyn Fn(&'static str) -> Box<dyn Iterator<Item = &'static str>>;

fn main() {
    let f1: StrFn = &|s: &'static str| Box::new(s.split_whitespace());
    let f2: StrFn = &|s: &'static str| Box::new(s.split_ascii_whitespace());
    let fs = vec![f1, f2];

    fs[0]("rust 2020").for_each(|s| println!("{}", s));
}

Maybe there are better ways.

  • I think you can eliminate the outer box: playground. – user4815162342 Dec 30 '19 at 20:06
  • @user4815162342 thanks, answer updated. – edwardw Dec 30 '19 at 20:09
  • 1
    Thanks. Further, one can extract the creation of the closure into a helper function that (effectively) returns an impl [trait behind StrFn]. Unfortunately type aliases don't work for traits, so the function can't name a nice symbolic impl. Still, here it is: playground. – user4815162342 Dec 30 '19 at 20:25
  • I understood that impl trait is now a syntax for unboxed abstraction, thus it cannot be used to abstract different functions, that essentially requires boxed abstraction. – Yohei Dec 31 '19 at 3:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.