1
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

vector<int> parseInts(string str) {
    istringstream ss(str);
    vector<int> integ;
    int val;
    while(ss){

        if(ss>>val){
            integ.push_back(val);
        }
    }

    return integ;
}
vector<int> parseInts2(string str) 
{
    vector<int> vec;    
    stringstream ss(str); 
    char ch;
    int temp;

    while(ss)   
    {
        ss>>temp>>ch;   >> operator
        vec.push_back(temp);   
    } 

    return vec; 
}
int main() {
    string str;
    cin >> str;
    vector<int> integers = parseInts(str);
    for(int i = 0; i < integers.size(); i++) {
        cout << integers[i] << "\n";
    }

    return 0;
}

i want to create a stream,to a string,read integers to the stream from the string and insert it in a vector and display its elements while the output is displaying nothing.what is wrong with the code?

EDIT

basically the question ask inputs in the form of integers that are separated by commas and asks us to print the integers after parsing it. i find no significant difference between the 2 functions but parseInt2 still works(while calling the function in main,of course instead of parseInt). Why?

6
  • 2
    Is parseInts supposed to do something with the unused str parameter?
    – Eljay
    Dec 30, 2019 at 18:36
  • Related to the previous comment, maybe this is your bug / typo istringstream ss;
    – drescherjm
    Dec 30, 2019 at 18:37
  • 2
    Future bug: cin >> str; will read one whitespace delimited token. Which means parseInts will get at most one number to parse. You probably want std::getline or similar to read multiple input tokens. Dec 30, 2019 at 18:40
  • I recommend adding a sample of the input the program must be able to accept. Without that sample we cannot propose answers, only guesses. Dec 30, 2019 at 18:51
  • 2
    This doesn't address the question, but while (ss) { if (ss >> val) { integer.push_back(val); } } should be just while (ss >> val) { integer.push_back(val); }. Dec 30, 2019 at 19:13

1 Answer 1

6

I fear that your question will be closed by people on SO.

But let me give you the answer.

Basically everything set already in the comments. Why not in an answer? I do not know.

Before you can read something from an std::istringstream, you need to put something in it. You need to initialize it. That is usually done by using its constructor:

istringstream ss(str);

In main, you have the problem, that you read only one value from std::cin with cin >> str;. You want to use std::getline instead, which reads a complete line. And not only "something" up to the next space. So

getline(cin, str);

will help you further.

In modern C++, with keeping the std::istringstream approach, you would probably write

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <sstream>

int main() {

    // Read a line and check, if that worked
    if (std::string str; std::getline(std::cin, str)) {

        // Create and initialize a std::istringstream
        std::istringstream iss(str);

        // Define a variable integers, use its range constructor with iterators
        std::vector integers(std::istream_iterator<int>(iss), {});

        // Range based for loop
        for (const int& i : integers) {
            std::cout << i << "\n";
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

That will save the subfunction.


EDIT:

OK, you want to read csv and you must use ">>".

If you want to read data separated by comma from a stream, then you need to extract:

  • an integer value from the stream
  • then a comma
  • then a integer
  • then a comma
  • then a integer
  • . . .

The extractor operator, or the functionality behind it, will always extract characters from a stream and convert it to a requested type (e.g. an integer), until it reaches a space or the conversion can not be continued any longer (for example, a "," is a separator).

That is the reason, why your 2nd function works.

It is important that you alwys check the status of the extraction operation. In the below example you will see that, at the end of the string, we try to read a comma, where there is none. The extraction fails, but we do not care. We ignore it by intent. To understand the functionality better, please see.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>

int main() {
    // Source or test data. We put it directly into the stream;
    std::istringstream ss{ "1,2,3,  4  ,  5,6" };
    std::vector<int> integers{};
    char comma{};
    int integer{};

    while (ss)  {

        // Read integer and check, if it could be read
        if (ss >> integer) {
            integers.push_back(integer);
            std::cout << "Read Integer " << integer << "\n";
        }
        else 
            std::cerr << "Error: Could not read integer\n";

        // Now read the comma
        if (ss && (ss >> comma))
            std::cout << "Read Comma: " << comma << "\n";
        else
            std::cerr << "Error: Could not read comma\n";
    }
    // SHow all values
    for (const int i : integers) std::cout << i << "\n";

    return 0;
}

If you have questions, I am happy to answer.

3
  • 1
    I fear that your question will be closed by people on SO. I join you in that. I'm surprised it stayed open long enough for you to answer. The only reason I didn't vote to close as "typo" is there are more bugs than just the unused str. Good call pulling in the stream_iterator and making this answer ideologically correct. Dec 30, 2019 at 19:08
  • thanx for your answer it helped me a lot,but the 'cin>>str' was part of the question,as in, they gave the whole main part while we had to only finish the function......... Dec 31, 2019 at 4:05
  • i corrected the first mistake and added the parameter str in the constructor. Can you please answer the edited question? Thanks in advance Dec 31, 2019 at 4:24

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