1

I have a c library to maintain, which is built by cmake. When I start to build it, it tells me that

cc1: warning: unrecognized command line option "-Wno-incompatible-pointer-types" [enabled by default]

yes, my gcc version is 4.8.5 and does not have that flag. So I want to disable it when the compiler does not support that flag.

After some searching, I came to this solution

include(CheckCCompilerFlag)
check_c_compiler_flag(-Wno-invalid-offsetof HAS_NO_INVALID_OFFSETOF)
if (HAS_NO_INVALID_OFFSETOF)
    set(CMAKE_C_FLAGS "${CMAKE_C_FLAGS} -Wno-invalid-offsetof")
endif()

but when I add it to my CMakeLists.txt, it does not work, the above warning still comes out.

After searching the cmake documentation, it tells me that

A positive result from this check indicates only that the compiler did not issue a diagnostic message when given the flag. Whether the flag has any effect or even a specific one is beyond the scope of this module.

According to that, my gcc does not support that flag, it won't issue a diagnostic message, so cmake thinks that my gcc supports that flag?

Is there any way to make it act as the way I like it to do ?

1 Answer 1

0

Quoting from man gcc

When an unrecognized warning option is requested (e.g., -Wunknown-warning), GCC emits a diagnostic stating that the option is not recognized. However, if the -Wno- form is used, the behavior is slightly different: no diagnostic is produced for -Wno-unknown-warning unless other diagnostics are being produced. This allows the use of new -Wno- options with old compilers, but if something goes wrong, the compiler warns that an unrecognized option is present.

You could modify your check to the following

include(CheckCCompilerFlag)
check_c_compiler_flag(-Winvalid-offsetof HAS_INVALID_OFFSETOF)
if (HAS_INVALID_OFFSETOF)
    set(CMAKE_C_FLAGS "${CMAKE_C_FLAGS} -Wno-invalid-offsetof")
endif()

This could theoretially break for some non-gcc compiler which happens to support -Winvalid-offsetof but not -Wno-invalid-offsetof. So if you want to be extra safe, add another check.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.