0

I have an Ordered dict as follow :

MY_ORDERED_DICT = OrderedDict([
    ('table1', {
        'required': True,
        'col': OrderedDict([
            ('id',                 'aaa'),
            ('registration_date',       'aaa'),
            ('date_of_birth',           'aaa'),
        ])
    }),
    ('table2', {
        'required': True,
        'col': OrderedDict([
            ('product_id',      'aaa'),
            ('id',              'aaa'),
            ('datetime',        'aaa'),
            ('quantity',        'aaa'),
        ])
    }),
    ('table3', {
        'required': False,
        'col': OrderedDict([
            ('product_id',      'aaa'),
            ('brand',           'aaa'),
            ('name',            'aaa'),
        ])
    }),
    ('table4', {
        'required': False,
        'col': OrderedDict([
            ('campaign_id',     'aaa'),
            ('id',         'aaa'),
            ('datetime',  'aaa'),
        ])
    }),
    ('table5', {
        'required': False,
        'col': OrderedDict([
            ('c_id',     'aaa'),
            ('id',         'aaa'),
            ('datetime',  'aaa'),
        ])
    })
])

From this OrderedDict I want to extract the keys that have a columns (which is also an OrderedDict) field containing the strings id and datetime.

I do this as follow :

list(map(lambda element: element[0], filter(lambda cel:  {'id', 'datetime'}.issubset(set(cel[1]['col'])), MY_ORDERED_DICT.items())))

And it seems to work pretty well. It does return :

['table2', 'table4', 'table5']

My problem is that I fear that somone will look at it and tells me that it's too complicated.

I'm looking for inspiration doing it in a more elegant manner.

4

Don't use map() and filter() when a list comprehension would be much clearer:

[
    key for key, value in MY_ORDERED_DICT.items()
    if {"id", "datetime"} <= value["col"].keys()
]

Note that the keys dictionary view is also a set, and you can test if a dictionary has a minimal set of keys with the <= or >= operators to determine if one is a subset or superset.

The above does the same work your code did and so produces the same output:

>>> [
...     key for key, value in MY_ORDERED_DICT.items()
...     if {"id", "datetime"} <= value["col"].keys()
... ]
['table2', 'table4', 'table5']
| improve this answer | |
  • Extremely minor optimization (don't bother if the inputs are always going to be small anyway): Either construct the set (or frozenset) outside the list comp and reuse it, or (since it's just two things to test) test if "id" in value["col"] and "datetime" in value["col"]; as written, this rebuilds the set on every test. – ShadowRanger Dec 31 '19 at 13:50
  • @ShadowRanger: Yes, for anything more than a few items in the dictionary that'd make a (small) difference. For other cases Python knows that a set literal like that can be treated as a constant, but in this case the AST optimizer isn't yet doing so, unfortunately. – Martijn Pieters Dec 31 '19 at 13:53
  • key views are set-like because you can use operators like <=, but they are not sets. – Booboo Dec 31 '19 at 14:00
  • @Booboo: Properly, they're Sets, in that they implement the collections.abc.Set interface. – ShadowRanger Dec 31 '19 at 14:00
  • @Booboo: they are not the set object, but they are sets! The implement the Set interface, as defined by collections.abc.Set. So they have a .isdisjoint() method, and support <, <=, >, >=, &, | and ^ operations with other sets. – Martijn Pieters Dec 31 '19 at 14:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.