0

This is my delete function

void deleteNode(Node** head, Node* deletingNode) {
    if (head == NULL || deletingNode == NULL)
        return;
    if (*head == deletingNode) {
        *head = deletingNode->next;
        displayNode(*head); //This is to check if the head has changed. And it has.
    }
    if (deletingNode->next != NULL)
        deletingNode->next->prev = deletingNode->prev;
    if (deletingNode->prev != NULL)
        deletingNode->prev->next = deletingNode->next;
    delete(deletingNode);
    return;
}

After I delete the head node and try do anything with the linked list, for example, display the whole linked list like so

void displayNode(Node* node) {
    cout << left << setw(4) << node->employee.empID
        << left << setw(20) << node->employee.empName
        << left << setw(8) << node->employee.empSalary
        << left << setw(25) << node->employee.empAddress
        << left << setw(15) << node->employee.empPhone
        << left << setw(2) << node->employee.depNo
        << left << setw(28) << node->employee.depName
        << left << setw(4) << node->employee.performance
        << '\n';
}
void displayAllNodes(Node* node) {
    displayColumnNames();
    while (node != NULL) {
        displayNode(node);
        node = node->next;
    }
}

An exception is thrown at the second line of the above block

Exception thrown at 0x78DBE26E (ucrtbased.dll) in Project.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0xDDDDDDDD. occurred

This ONLY happens when I delete the head node. Works just fine if I delete any other node.

So far I have tried making the double pointer in the deleteNode function into a single pointer but that didn't make a difference.

The whole code: https://codeshare.io/5oV8Jr

  • 1
    Show a minimal reproducible example. I don't see anything obviously wrong with deleteNode. The problem likely lies elsewhere, in the way you set up the list in the first place, and/or the way you call deleteNode. – Igor Tandetnik Jan 1 at 15:17
  • @IgorTandetnik I'm not sure how I could do a mre without messing things up. However the program is quite small around 500 lines codeshare.io/5oV8Jr – Mismaah Jan 1 at 15:25
  • 0xDDDDDDDD means you are dereferencing a deleted pointer that exists on the heap. Here is the explanation: 0xDDDDDDDD is a magic code meaning Used by Microsoft's C++ debugging heap to mark freed heap memory see here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/127404/487892 – drescherjm Jan 1 at 15:28
  • 1
    I'm not sure how I could do a mre without messing things up. You need to use your debugger to figure this one out. Thankfully you have one of the best debuggers. – drescherjm Jan 1 at 15:30
  • 1
    deleteRecord takes head by value. Changes made to head inside the function are not visible to the caller: head in mainMenu is not updated, and becomes a dangling pointer. As I predicted, the problem lies in the code not shown; hence the need for a minimal reproducible example – Igor Tandetnik Jan 1 at 15:37
0

Update: Following the fix from comments section(thanks to drescherjm and Igor Tandetnik), here's another bug I found and a quick fix to that.

I believe there's an issue is in this part of code:

if (*head == deletingNode) {
  *head = deletingNode->next;
  displayNode(*head); //This is to check if the head has changed. And it has.
}

What if you have just 1 node in the linked list and you call deleteNode(). Now head and deletingNode points to the same node and *head = deletingNode->next; sets the head to NULL after which you're calling displayNode(*head); which will throw an error.

Quick fix:

if (*head == deletingNode) {
  *head = deletingNode->next;
  if(*head != NULL)
    displayNode(*head); //This is to check if the head has changed. And it has.
}
  • Even though this isn't the original problem I had, thanks for catching an additional bug. – Mismaah Jan 1 at 15:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.