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In a part of a program I have printed out the same pointer in two different ways.

vpx_codec_iface_t *ptr = vpx_codec_vp9_cx();
printf("ptr1 %p\n", ptr);
printf("ptr2 %p\n", vpx_codec_vp9_cx());

This strangely results in the following output.

ptr1 FFFFFFFFDAF9CED0
ptr2 00000000DAF9CED0

Playing around with the program, I can "fix" the error by adding some code, or adding some newlines.

int x = 0;
vpx_codec_iface_t *ptr = vpx_codec_vp9_cx();
printf("ptr1 %p\n", ptr);
printf("ptr2 %p\n", vpx_codec_vp9_cx());
printf("x=%d\n", x);

This results in the following output.

ptr1 0000000066A7CED0
ptr2 0000000066A7CED0
x=0

What could be causing this behavior? I'm using the Visual Studio 2019 compiler on Windows 10, compiling for x64. The function call vpx_codec_vp9_cx() is implemented in vpxmd.lib which comes from the libvpx project.

Edit: I'm still going through your answers and comments, but I have created a minimal example below. Unfortunately it involves building the whole of the vpx library so it would take me some time to simplify that part.

#include <stdio.h>
#include "vpx/vpx_encoder.h"

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  printf("This is main\n");
  vpx_codec_iface_t *ptr = vpx_codec_vp9_cx();
  int x = 0;
  printf("ptr1 %p\n", ptr);
  printf("ptr2 %p\n", vpx_codec_vp9_cx());
  printf("x=%d\n", x);
  exit(0);
}

7
  • 1
    That's a textbook sign extension problem, but since vpx_codec_vp9_cx() returns a vpx_codec_iface_t*, that doesn't make any sense here. The fact that the problem goes away in your second case suggests UB in your program, but there's none in the code shown. You'll have to try to come up with a minimal reproducible example, sorry. Jan 1, 2020 at 16:51
  • Okay so it's somewhere else in the program that's causing the issue. I'll shrink it down to a minimal reproducible example - thanks.
    – Mark
    Jan 1, 2020 at 17:00
  • 3
    Technically, you produce undefined behavior by passing a vpx_codec_iface_t * as the argument corresponding to a %p directive. It ought first to be converted (by cast, for example) to type void *. It's unclear whether that would resolve your problem, though, and even if it did, that does not rule out an issue elsewhere in the program. Jan 1, 2020 at 17:05
  • 1
    @JohnBollinger Ah, didn't realise it had to be void* (though in hindsight that makes total sense). It could be just that simple then. Jan 1, 2020 at 17:07
  • 1
    Yes, @LightnessRacesBY-SA3.0, the specs require a void * in particular. This is consistent with the fact that in general, pointers to different types are not required to have the same size or representation, and the fact that no pointer type is subject to the default argument conversions. But in practice, I doubt this is actually the OP's issue. Jan 1, 2020 at 17:11

1 Answer 1

8

Do you have warnings turned on in your compile environment? This looks very much like you are missing a prototype for vpx_code_vp9_cx(). In the first case, assignment to ptr, the expected type coercion will sign extend the (default) int valued vpx_codex_vp9_cs(). In the second case, printf, it will be left intact. A simpler example can be had with: print.c:

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    void *x = myptr();
    printf("x = %p\n", x);
    printf("myptr() = %p\n", myptr());
    return 0;
}

myptr.c:

int myptr(void) {
    return 0xd0000020;
}

Notice that print.c has no declaration of myptr(). On my system, an unadorned compile: cc print.c myptr.c -o p yields:

print.c:6:12: warning: implicit declaration of function 'myptr' is invalid in C99
      [-Wimplicit-function-declaration]
        void *x = myptr();
                  ^
print.c:6:8: warning: incompatible integer to pointer conversion initializing
      'void *' with an expression of type 'int' [-Wint-conversion]
        void *x = myptr();
              ^   ~~~~~~~
print.c:8:27: warning: format specifies type 'void *' but the argument has type
      'int' [-Wformat]
        printf("myptr() = %p\n", myptr());
                          ~~     ^~~~~~~
                          %d
3 warnings generated.

my compiler is obviously long-winded, but the point is that every compiler from the past 30 years should report some sort of diagnostic that you should at least understand before ignoring.

3
  • Agree, high probability of it being this. Unfortunately without a MCVE in the question it's all just guesswork :( Jan 1, 2020 at 17:13
  • Indeed, the compiler was giving a warning which I was ignoring "warning C6066: non-pointer passed as parameter _Param_(2) when pointer is required in call to printf" and even showing me the function vpx_codec_vp9_cx() was (implicitly?) declared as returning int. I wasn't aware of this implicit function declaration "feature"!
    – Mark
    Jan 1, 2020 at 17:41
  • 1
    It comes from the days before C required function declarations; the default return value was assumed int. For decades, on most machines, sizeof(int) == sizeof(char *), so it seldom mattered.
    – mevets
    Jan 1, 2020 at 17:47

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