6

Let's say I have a class with several attributes but I only need some of them for object construction; the remaining attributes's values depend on these public attributes. However, I'd like to still access the remaining attributes's values with methods named after the attributes. From the top of my head, there are two options:

First option:

  • Overload the new method. Or leave the new method as is, and instead use a BUILD submethod to both set the passed argument to the right attribute and set remaining attributes using this argument's value.
class Foo {
    has Int $.a;
    has Int $.b;
    has Int $.c;

    submethod BUILD(:$!a) {
        $!b = $!a ** 2;
        $!c = $!a ** 3;
    }
}
say Foo.new(:2a, :1b);   #=> Foo.new(a => 2, b => 4, c => 8)
say Foo.new(:2a, :1b).b; #=> 8

Second option:

Declare with $. only those attributes needed for object construction and modify the remaining attributes (declared with $!) with a TWEAK submethod after object construction. However, now I need to create accesor methods for these attributes.

class Bar {
    has Int $.a;
    has Int $!b;
    has Int $!c;

    submethod TWEAK {
        $!b = $!a ** 2;
        $!c = $!a ** 3;
    }

    method b { $!b }
    method c { $!c }
}
say Bar.new(:2a, :1b);   #=> Bar.new(a => 2)
say Bar.new(:2a, :1b).b; #=> 8

Questions

What's the best option? Are there any other options? What are the advantages/drawbacks for each option?

  • Considering that passing b and c parameters has no bearing on the object creation I find it a bit odd someone would find the .perl output of Foo.new(a => 2, b => 4, c => 8) acceptable. – ugexe Jan 2 at 19:03
  • Perhaps an "is accessible" trait on the attribute, that would automatically do option 2 on private attributes? I've been in that place many times. – Elizabeth Mattijsen Jan 3 at 14:48
  • @ugexe, I've seen too many times so I wasn't surprised. However, as you say, it gives the wrong impression about those attributes accessible at object construction. – uzlxxxx Jan 4 at 14:24
  • 1
    Added an issue to the problem-solving repo: github.com/perl6/problem-solving/issues/145 – Elizabeth Mattijsen Jan 4 at 15:12
  • 1
    Implemented it and put it in a PR: github.com/rakudo/rakudo/pull/3404 – Elizabeth Mattijsen Jan 4 at 19:08
7

Personally I'd go nice and simple :

class Foo { 
    has Int $.a; 
    has Int $!b = $!a ** 2; 
    has Int $!c = $!a ** 3;
    method b { $!b }
    method c { $!c }
}
say Foo.new(:2a, :1b); #=>  Foo.new(a => 2)
say Foo.new(:2a, :1b).b; #=> 4

Just use the default constructor and default values for the attributes and add a couple of basic read methods. The default constructor only updates public attributes so if you try and override b or c this is ignored.

If you wanted you could add a BUILD submethod to error if someone tries and sets them.

A good point raised in the comments for this case (and possibly the final use case) doing it like this :

class Foo { 
    has Int $.a; 
    method b() is pure { $!a ** 2 }
    method c() is pure { $!a ** 3 }
}
say Foo.new(:2a, :1b); #=>  Foo.new(a => 2)
say Foo.new(:2a, :1b).b; #=> 4

Depending on the complexity of the calculation you may want to use the is cached trait too.

  • I edited my original answer after re-reading the question. – Scimon Proctor Jan 3 at 9:44
  • 1
    I'd probably even go with class Foo { has Int $.a; method b { $!a ** 2 }; method c { $!a ** 3 } } it's simpler, even if it technically adds some overhead (though minor if just a simple math op, and if it's major, is cached could be added to speed things up). – user0721090601 Jan 3 at 12:52
  • I don't mind this answer. The only thing I would add is if $!a is necessary for the object to be constructed, then the is required trait should be used with it IMO. – Kaiepi Jan 12 at 2:25
3

I read an article a couple of weeks ago that talked about this ambiguity between the constructor arguments of a class and its public interface but I cannot find it anymore.

But I am thinking you could leverage FALLBACK.

class Bar {
    has Int $.a;
    has Int $!b;
    has Int $!c;

    submethod TWEAK {
        $!b = $!a ** 2;
        $!c = $!a ** 3;
    }

    method FALLBACK( $name ) {
        self.^attributes.first( *.name eq "\$!$name" ).?get_value(self);
    }
}

say Bar.new(:2a);
say Bar.new(:2a).c;

That's kinda hacky though, and costly since the attribute lookups have to go though FALLBACK and introspection. What would be nice to have is a trait that would create an accessor but have no effect on the constructor. Something like

class Bar {
    has Int $.a;
    has Int $.b is shady; # or whatever name
    has Int $.c is shady;
}

But I am not aware such a thing exists.

  • I'd have liked to read the article you mention. I think I'll steer away from using FALLBACK since the class that prompted me to ask this question is pretty simple and thus using metaprogramming for it would be a bit excessive in this case. – uzlxxxx Jan 4 at 14:33

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