-1

When I try to run this code, the result is.

{Yellow 99}
{Yellow 10}

Repl it link

package main

import (
  "fmt"
  "sync"
)

type Fruit struct {
  color string
  price int
}

func (f *Fruit) UpdatePrice(newPrice int) {
  f.price = newPrice
}

func main() {
  mango := Fruit{color: "Yellow", price: 10}
  var wg sync.WaitGroup
  one := make(chan Fruit)
  wg.Add(1)
  go func() {
    defer wg.Done()
    freshMango := <- one
    freshMango.UpdatePrice(99)
    fmt.Println(freshMango)
  }()
  one <- mango
  wg.Wait()
  fmt.Println(mango)
}

Since I have updated the price for the fruit I was hoping that to be reflected at the final print of mango as well but both have different values. Can anyone elaborate on what is happening in this scenario?

4

You are currently passing a copy of the Fruit object to your "one" channel. You need to pass a pointer to the object to your channel instead, and allow the channel to support *Fruit instead of Fruit.

package main

import (
  "fmt"
  "sync"
)

type Fruit struct {
  color string
  price int
}

func (f *Fruit) UpdatePrice(newPrice int) {
  f.price = newPrice
}

func main() {
  mango := Fruit{color: "Yellow", price: 10}
  var wg sync.WaitGroup
  one := make(chan *Fruit)
  wg.Add(1)
  go func() {
    defer wg.Done()
    var freshMango *Fruit
    freshMango = <- one
    freshMango.UpdatePrice(99)
    fmt.Println(*freshMango)
  }()
  one <- &mango
  wg.Wait()
  fmt.Println(mango)
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    As I can see, that by default, go passes the values by copying it. Is that what they mean when they say "share memory by communicating"? – Aziz Jan 3 at 18:58
  • Yep, that references the idea of passing reference to data between goroutines with channels. – kmurrell Jan 3 at 19:05
  • Sorry, may I know what do you mean by references? – Aziz Jan 3 at 19:10
  • 3
    But passing a pointer over the channel creates a whole separate problem of potential data races, and in fact is the exact opposite of sharing memory by communicating. Sharing memory by communicating would be passing values over channels, then retrieving the updated value when it's next needed. – Adrian Jan 3 at 19:58
  • 1
    That makes it very much evident — no passing of reference when using channels but passing it as a copy of the value. – Aziz Jan 4 at 5:12
2
package main

import (
  "fmt"
  "sync"
)

type Fruit struct {
  color string
  price int
}

func (f *Fruit) UpdatePrice(newPrice int) {
  f.price = newPrice
}

func main() {
  // instead of pushing a copy of a Fruit struct you need to push a pointer of Fruit into the channel
  mango := &Fruit{color: "Yellow", price: 10}
  var wg sync.WaitGroup
  one := make(chan *Fruit)
  wg.Add(1)
  go func() {
    defer wg.Done()
    freshMango := <- one
    freshMango.UpdatePrice(99)
    fmt.Println(freshMango)
  }()
  one <- mango
  wg.Wait()
  fmt.Println(mango)
}

Golang is copying every none pointer value before passing it to a function, channel, etc

It isn't good practice to passing pointers from a goroutine to another goroutine. It can create very nasty bugs because both goroutines can manipulate the underlying type.

| improve this answer | |
  • But this might be the expected behavior most of the time since we're passing the ownership of the value, and if we're going to use the value again, all we have to do is to receive the value from the receiver. – Aziz Jan 4 at 14:44
  • It's not like an ownership transfer because all goroutines who have access to this pointer can manipulate the underlying type. if you didn't implement a guard for your type then race conditions are very likely by mistake and very hard to debug. Even a pointer address gets copied so this why they call it "share memory by communicating" so if you want that multiple goroutines can manipulate the same type instance then you should definitely implement a protection mechanism against race conditions – Donutloop Jan 4 at 14:58
  • You are right. Creating multiple goroutines with reference to the same value is not a good idea. We should avoid this specific pattern instead of not passing the reference. – Aziz Jan 4 at 16:17
  • Can you please elaborate when you said pointer address gets copied? – Aziz Jan 4 at 16:19
0

Any goroutine who has access to this pointer can manipulate the underlying type and no order got enforced how this type should get manipulated.

Compile this program on your local machine

    package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
)

func main() {

    i := new(int)
    var wg sync.WaitGroup
    wg.Add(1)
    go func() {
        *i += 10
        wg.Done()
    }()

    wg.Add(1)
    go func() {
        *i *= 10
        wg.Done()
    }()

    wg.Add(1)
    go func() {
        *i = *i / 10
        wg.Done()
    }()

    wg.Add(1)
    go func() {
        *i += 10
        wg.Done()
    }()

    wg.Add(1)
    go func() {
        *i += 10
        wg.Done()
    }()
    wg.Wait()

    fmt.Println(*i)
}

Now run this go program like 1000 times in a row

for i in {1..1000}; do ./main; done

if you run this program then you will see the result will be "randomly".

| improve this answer | |

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