6

I am trying to add a custom field in my logging using LogRecordFactory. I am repeatedly calling a class and every time I do that, I want to set the custom_attribute in the init module so the remainder of the code within the class will have this attribute. But I cannot get this to work. I found the following which works, but its static.

import logging

old_factory = logging.getLogRecordFactory()

def record_factory(*args, **kwargs):
    record = old_factory(*args, **kwargs)
    record.custom_attribute = "whatever"
    return record



logging.basicConfig(format="%(custom_attribute)s - %(message)s")
logging.setLogRecordFactory(record_factory)
logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
logging.debug("test")

This will output correctly:

whatever - test

However, my use case is that the custom_attribute will vary. Every time I call a specific function, I want to change this. So it seems like record_factory needs another parameter passed to it so it can then return the correct record with the new parameter. But I cant figure it out. I have tried adding a parameter to the function, but when I make the call I get:

TypeError: __init__() missing 7 required positional arguments: 'name', 'level', 'pathname', 'lineno', 'msg', 'args', and 'exc_info'

I think this has something to do with the *args and **kwargs but I don't really know. Also, why are there no parenthesis after record_factory when its called by logging.setLogRecordFactory? I have never seen a function work like this.

2 Answers 2

4

You can try to use closure:

import logging

old_factory = logging.getLogRecordFactory()

def record_factory_factory(context_id):
    def record_factory(*args, **kwargs):
        record = old_factory(*args, **kwargs)
        record.custom_attribute = context_id
        return record
    return record_factory


logging.basicConfig(format="%(custom_attribute)s - %(message)s")
logging.setLogRecordFactory(record_factory_factory("whatever"))
logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
logging.debug("test")

logging.setLogRecordFactory(record_factory_factory("whatever2"))
logger = logging.getLogger()
logger.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
logging.debug("test")

result:

$ python3 log_test.py                                                          
whatever - test
whatever2 - test
0

I stumbled upon this question while I was trying to do something similar. This is how I solved it, assuming that you want to add something called xyz to every log line (further explanation below):

import logging
import threading
 

thread_local = threading.local()
 

def add_xyz_to_logrecords(xyz):
    factory = logging.getLogRecordFactory()
    if isinstance(factory, XYZLogFactory):
        factory.set_xyz(xyz)
    else:
        logging.setLogRecordFactory(XYZLogFactory(factory, xyz))
 

class XYZLogFactory():
    def __init__(self, original_factory, xyz):
        self.original_factory = original_factory
        thread_local.xyz = xyz

    def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        record = self.original_factory(*args, **kwargs)
        try:
            record.xyz = thread_local.xyz
        except AttributeError:
            pass
        return record

   def set_xyz(self, xyz):
        thread_local.xyz = xyz

Here I've created a callable class XYZLogFactory, that remembers what the current value of xyz is, and also remembers what the original LogRecordFactory was. When called as a function, it creates a record using the original LogRecordFactory, and adds an xyz attribute with the current value. The thread_local is to make it thread-safe, but for an easier version, you could just use an attribute on the XYZLogFactory:

class XYZLogFactory():
    def __init__(self, original_factory, xyz):
        self.original_factory = original_factory
        self.xyz = xyz

    def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        record = self.original_factory(*args, **kwargs)
        record.xyz = self.xyz
        return record

   def set_xyz(self, xyz):
        self.xyz = xyz

In my very first attempt (not shown here), I did not store the original factory, but stored it implicitly in the new LogRecordFactury using a closure. However, after a while that led to a RecursionError, because it kept calling the previous factory, which called the previous factory, etc.

Regarding your last question: there are no parentheses because the function is not called here. Instead it's passed to the logging.setLogRecordFactory, which saves it in a variable somewhere, and then calls that someplace else. If you want more information you can google something like 'functions as first class citizens'. Easy example:

x = str  # Assign to x the function that gives string representation of object
x(1)  # outputs the string representation of 1, same as if you'd called str(1)
> '1'

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.