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I am using SharedPreferences in my android app. I am using both commit() and apply() method from shared preference. When I use AVD 2.3 it shows no error, but when I run the code in AVD 2.1, apply() method shows error.

So what's the difference between these two? And by using only commit() can I store the preference value without any problem?

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  • 129
    This is a year old, but I'm going to comment on it anyway, although it may be obvious, none of the answers make this point: apply() will asynchronously do disk I/O while commit() is synchronous. So you really shouldn't call commit() from the UI thread. Jun 18, 2012 at 19:45
  • Of note, when multiple SharedPreferences.Editor objects are in use, the last one to call apply() wins. Therefore, you can use apply() in lieu of commit() safely if you make sure only one SharedPreferences.Editor is being used by your application.
    – aoeu
    Apr 28, 2017 at 22:48
  • 2
    As per Android Studio Lint warning: commit() will save data immediately and synchronously. However, apply() will save it asynchronously (in the background) and thereby improving some performance. That is why apply() is preferred over commit() if you don't care about its return type (If the data is saved successfully or not). Feb 16, 2018 at 8:54
  • Is there a way to disable the Lint warning when using commit()?
    – QED
    Jun 27, 2019 at 18:39

9 Answers 9

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apply() was added in 2.3, it commits without returning a boolean indicating success or failure.

commit() returns true if the save works, false otherwise.

apply() was added as the Android dev team noticed that almost no one took notice of the return value, so apply is faster as it is asynchronous.

http://developer.android.com/reference/android/content/SharedPreferences.Editor.html#apply()

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    This answer is true but I guess the @spacemanaki 's comment above is also true contains valuable information Nov 8, 2013 at 10:24
  • 67
    commit() writes its data to persistent storage immediately, whereas apply() will handle it in the background.
    – capt.swag
    Jan 4, 2015 at 6:32
  • 21
    does it create a race condition? Jun 30, 2015 at 22:06
  • 48
    What happens if I write something with apply() and try to read it immediately after? Is the read guaranteed to give me the newest value? The docs say if another commit() happens after you fire apply(), that commit() will block until the apply() is persisted to disk, which makes it clear that this problem does not happen when it comes to 'write' operations, but what about if you are writing and reading immediately after? From my tests, the newest value is returned, but I want to know if this is 100% guaranteed or not. Sep 20, 2015 at 22:44
  • 27
    it's safe to replace any instance of commit() with apply() see developer.android.com/reference/android/content/… Sep 23, 2015 at 7:56
263

tl;dr:

  • commit() writes the data synchronously (blocking the thread its called from). It then informs you about the success of the operation.
  • apply() schedules the data to be written asynchronously. It does not inform you about the success of the operation.
  • If you save with apply() and immediately read via any getX-method, the new value will be returned!
  • If you called apply() at some point and it's still executing, any calls to commit() will block until all past apply-calls and the current commit-call are finished.

More in-depth information from the SharedPreferences.Editor Documentation:

Unlike commit(), which writes its preferences out to persistent storage synchronously, apply() commits its changes to the in-memory SharedPreferences immediately but starts an asynchronous commit to disk and you won't be notified of any failures. If another editor on this SharedPreferences does a regular commit() while a apply() is still outstanding, the commit() will block until all async commits are completed as well as the commit itself.

As SharedPreferences instances are singletons within a process, it's safe to replace any instance of commit() with apply() if you were already ignoring the return value.

The SharedPreferences.Editor interface isn't expected to be implemented directly. However, if you previously did implement it and are now getting errors about missing apply(), you can simply call commit() from apply().

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    This is a much better answer since it mentions that apply() is asynchronous and pending writes block future calls to commit().
    – spaaarky21
    Oct 28, 2015 at 17:18
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I'm experiencing some problems using apply() instead commit(). As stated before in other responses, the apply() is asynchronous. I'm getting the problem that the changes formed to a "string set" preference are never written to the persistent memory.

It happens if you "force detention" of the program or, in the ROM that I have installed on my device with Android 4.1, when the process is killed by the system due to memory necessities.

I recommend to use "commit()" instead "apply()" if you want your preferences alive.

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  • Are you sure your problem is not related due to concurrent threading? After you send apply(), you have to wait a while to read the things you added, otherwise the UI thread will attempt to read before the worker thread of apply() commited the changes. Aug 21, 2014 at 5:11
  • Regarding string set, stackoverflow.com/questions/16820252/… Aug 20, 2015 at 9:34
  • @JoseLSegura - the docs suggest otherwise: developer.android.com/intl/ja/reference/android/content/… "You don't need to worry about Android component lifecycles and their interaction with apply() writing to disk. The framework makes sure in-flight disk writes from apply() complete before switching states." I'm wondering if what you are seeing is a bug in Android, and if so whether it has been fixed in newer versions. Sep 19, 2015 at 11:59
  • The very same problem washappening to me using the library "ProcessPhoenix" to reset my app. I was saving a preference just before performing a reset, and "apply" was not working.
    – ElYeante
    May 5, 2019 at 22:31
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Use apply().

It writes the changes to the RAM immediately and waits and writes it to the internal storage(the actual preference file) after. Commit writes the changes synchronously and directly to the file.

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  • commit() is synchronously, apply() is asynchronous

  • apply() is void function.

  • commit() returns true if the new values were successfully written to persistent storage.

  • apply() guarantees complete before switching states , you don't need to worry about Android component lifecycles

If you dont use value returned from commit() and you're using commit() from main thread, use apply() instead of commit()

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  • 1
    For clarity, what are those "switching states"?
    – carloswm85
    Oct 18, 2020 at 1:49
  • @carloswm85 2yrs old but to clarify: usually "switching states" means events like orientation change.
    – mrahimygk
    Dec 17, 2020 at 8:01
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The docs give a pretty good explanation of the difference between apply() and commit():

Unlike commit(), which writes its preferences out to persistent storage synchronously, apply() commits its changes to the in-memory SharedPreferences immediately but starts an asynchronous commit to disk and you won't be notified of any failures. If another editor on this SharedPreferences does a regular commit() while a apply() is still outstanding, the commit() will block until all async commits are completed as well as the commit itself. As SharedPreferences instances are singletons within a process, it's safe to replace any instance of commit() with apply() if you were already ignoring the return value.

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The difference between commit() and apply()

We might be confused by those two terms, when we are using SharedPreference. Basically they are probably the same, so let’s clarify the differences of commit() and apply().

1.Return value:

apply() commits without returning a boolean indicating success or failure. commit() returns true if the save works, false otherwise.

  1. Speed:

apply() is faster. commit() is slower.

  1. Asynchronous v.s. Synchronous:

apply(): Asynchronous commit(): Synchronous

  1. Atomic:

apply(): atomic commit(): atomic

  1. Error notification:

apply(): No commit(): Yes

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    How is apply() "faster" than commit()? They essentially represent a same task that would be put in Looper of the thread. commit() puts that task in the main Looper while apply() takes it on the background, thereby keeping the main looper free of disk I/O task.
    – Taseer
    Sep 25, 2019 at 16:31
  • 1
    Unlike commit(), which writes its preferences out to persistent storage synchronously, apply() commits its changes to the in-memory SharedPreferences immediately but starts an asynchronous commit to disk and you won't be notified of any failures. If another editor on this SharedPreferences does a regular commit() while a apply() is still outstanding, the commit() will block until all async commits are completed as well as the commit itself see the DOC developer.android.com/reference/android/content/… Sep 26, 2019 at 3:53
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From javadoc:

Unlike commit(), which writes its preferences out to persistent storage synchronously, apply() commits its changes to the in-memory SharedPreferences immediately but starts an asynchronous commit to disk and you won't be notified of any failures. If another editor on this SharedPreferences does a regular commit() while a > apply() is still outstanding, the commit() will block until all async commits are completed as well as the commit itself

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While working with a web API I noticed the main shortcomings for apply() when using shared preferences before logging out.

Behold the following scenario: User logs in and token (for automatic relogging) was passed with the POST.

SharedPreferences preferences = App.getContext().getSharedPreferences("UserCredentials", Context.MODE_PRIVATE);

SharedPreferences.Editor editor = preferences.edit();

editor.putString("TOKEN",token);

editor.apply();

Token is available throughout all sessions, no problem and automatic relogging is done without any further problems throughout the states.

While writing the logout function I cleared the shared preferences as follows

SharedPreferences preferences = App.getContext().getSharedPreferences("UserCredentials", Context.MODE_PRIVATE);

SharedPreferences.Editor editor = preferences.edit();

editor.clear();

editor.apply()

In short you could simply write as:

preferences.edit().clear().apply()

To make sure I cleared the cache I would Log before logging out, and preferences.getString("TOKEN"); showed as null.

After restarting the main activity (as it started with a login fragment) - I would check the token again, using:

SharedPreferences preferences = App.getContext().getSharedPreferences("UserCredentials", MODE_PRIVATE);
        
String retrievedToken = preferences.getString("TOKEN",null); // Second param = default value

Log.d(TAG, "RETRIEVING TOKEN: " + retrievedToken);

The token actually re-appeared, even though the token was most certainly cleared before logging out.

(Causing a logout -> 'login-using-token loop)

Only after adding editor.commit(); to both setting and clearing the token would actually be permanently gone.

Do note, I used an emulator.

This behavior actually makes sence, as the in-memory storage is updated but the async call never made it before the app was restarted.

Therefor commit(); would FORCE the app to wait (synchronously) with actual subsequent commands like system.exit() etcetera, while apply() could very well fail if other commands would force a certain state change in the app.

To make sure you hit all the right spots, you can always use apply() & commit() both subsequently.

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