3

I'm trying to do something with array passing and access types. I've run into a situation where the stack size on an embedded system makes it difficult to pass around a large array through the typical parameter passing mechanism.

To save stack size, I've started using access types but I don't want to do dynamic allocation.

What I have is something like this:

type My_Array_Type is array (Natural range<>) of Integer;
type My_Array_Type_Ptr is access all My_Array_Type;

procedure Do_Stuff(Things : My_Array_Type_Ptr) is
begin
 -- things 
end Do_Stuff;

procedure Do_Stuff(Num_Things : Integer) is
  Things : My_Array_Type_Ptr := new My_Array_Type(1..Num_Things);
begin
  Do_Stuff(Things);
  -- more things
end Do_Stuff;

HOWEVER, what I'd like to do is something like this:

type My_Array_Type is array (Natural range<>) of Integer;

procedure Do_Stuff(Things : access all My_Array_Type) is
begin
 -- things 
end Do_Stuff;

procedure Do_Stuff(Num_Things : Integer) is
  Things : aliased My_Array_Type(1..Num_Things);
begin
  Do_Stuff(Things'Access);
  -- more things
end Do_Stuff;

But obviously it doesn't work.

Essentially, I want to pass a reference to the stack allocated array and change it in the other subprogram, but I don't want dynamically allocated memory. How can I do this?

Also, as a side note: I keep seeing conflicting information about if something is dynamically allocated if it has to be released or not -- I read most implementations don't have garbage collectors but don't need them. Can anyone clarify -- In the example I showed first, do I need to explicitly deallocate?

EDIT: After trying the solutions mentioned below, I settled on a combination of two things:

  1. Using the in out parameter passing mechanism.
  2. Reducing the storage requirements of my data type.

So rather than Integer I'm using:

type UInt8 is new Interfaces.Unsigned_8;

Which is:

type UInt8 is mod 2**8
     with Size => 8;

This works perfectly, since my values aren't actually integers, they are in fact unsigned bytes.

  • 2
    For the deallocation question. You do have to manually deallocate in your example. Ada does not do this for you unless you use a third party library that provides it, a container or holder from the Ada.Containers packages, or an access type that leaves scope and has a specified storage size (your access type is library level and has no storage size set). So you would use Unchecked_Deallocation for your example – Jere Jan 7 at 15:20
  • What makes you think that passing an access value will save stack space? I don't know of any compiler that doesn't pass large arrays by reference. – Jeffrey R. Carter Jan 11 at 14:49
6

In Ada, you really don’t need to use access types for this situation.

Remarks below for native Ada code; for imported (& I suppose exported) subprograms the generated code obviously needs to obey the foreign language conventions.

The mode of a parameter (whether you’re allowed to write to it, whether (if you’re allowed to write to it) it has some initial value) is distinct from the parameter passing mechanism.

If you have a parameter of size larger than a register and the parameter passing mechanism is not by-reference (i.e. by passing the address of the actual object), complain to your compiler vendor!

The Ada way would be like this:

with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;
with System.Storage_Elements;
procedure Jsinglet is

   type My_Array_Type is array (Natural range<>) of Integer;

   procedure Do_Stuff_1 (Things : in out My_Array_Type) is
   begin
      Put_Line (System.Storage_Elements.To_Integer (Things'Address)'Img);
   end Do_Stuff_1;

   procedure Do_Stuff (Num_Things : Integer) is
      Things : My_Array_Type (1 .. Num_Things);
   begin
      Put_Line (System.Storage_Elements.To_Integer (Things'Address)'Img);
      Do_Stuff_1 (Things);
   end Do_Stuff;

begin
   Do_Stuff (42);
end Jsinglet;

Running the program results here in

$ ./jsinglet 
 140732831549024
 140732831549024

showing that the address has been passed, not the value.

The in out mode on Do_Stuff_1’s parameter means that Do_Stuff_1 can read the contents of the array passed to it before writing to it.

out would mean that Do_Stuff_1 shouldn’t read the contents until it has itself written them (it can, but - depending on the parameter’s type - it may read uninitialized or default-initialized data)

in would mean that the contents couldn’t be written to.

  • 1
    Thank you as always Simon. My first pass at it was to use the in/out modes but then I realized the problem was that the stack size was being exceeded -- on my platform, which is a STM32F429ZI, the stack size is 4*1024. I assume what was happening was that with a large array ~ 1k, between that and the other bits I was exceeding this limit. Let me try again and see if this simpler approach will work. – jsinglet Jan 7 at 16:35
  • 1
    It’s certainly not obvious how to increase the stack size of the main program, but you can alter the stack size of a task (aspect Storage_Size). – Simon Wright Jan 7 at 20:30
  • 2
    I had a problem when I tried to use Unchecked_Conversion to convert an array of "this" into an array of "that". But UC actually makes a copy! – Simon Wright Jan 7 at 20:32
  • 2
    I wanted to let you know I was able to resolve my problem by using a combination of the technique, above, and changing the datatype to be smaller. That seems to have resolved my issue. – jsinglet Jan 8 at 16:37
  • (question updated to reflect what I did) – jsinglet Jan 8 at 16:44
4

As of Ada2012 you can mark parameters as aliased and they will be passed by reference, but your source object must also be either tagged or aliased.

EDIT: It cannot be an array either it appears, so look below. Aliased parameters do work for types like integers, enumerations, records, etc. though.

You can also wrap the array in a tagged or limited record to force the compiler to use by reference passing as those are "by reference" types

type My_Array_Type is array (Natural range<>) of Integer;
type By_Reference(Length : Natural) is tagged record  -- or limited
   Elements : My_Array_Type(1..Length);
end record;

procedure Do_Stuff(Things : in out By_Reference) is
begin
 -- things 
end Do_Stuff;

procedure Do_Stuff(Num_Things : Integer) is
  Things : By_Reference(Num_Things);
begin
  Do_Stuff(Things);
  -- more things
end Do_Stuff;

For your deallocation question, your example must explicitly deallocate the memory. There are ways to get automatic deallocation:

  • Compiler with Garbage Collection (I know of none)
  • Custom 3rd party library that provides it
  • Use a holder or container from Ada.Containers
  • Use a local (non library level) named access type with a specified storage size (your access type is library level and has not storage size specified). When the access type goes out of scope it will deallocate.
  • Thanks for these excellent tips, @Jere -- I'll give that a shot and report back my results here. Also, thanks for the clarification on the garbage collection issue, your comments were very helpful. – jsinglet Jan 7 at 16:39
  • Hi Jere -- I tried your first example, but I get an error untagged actual does not match aliased formal "Things". GIST is here: gist.github.com/jsinglet/fefc2c3dab23d43096922fee7dcc297f – jsinglet Jan 7 at 16:50
  • @jsinglet yeah, I didn't realize it wouldn't work for arrays. It works for all other types, but apparently arrays are special. The wrapper options work though. I'll edit the post – Jere Jan 7 at 20:51

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