256

Is it possible to disable form fields using CSS? I of course know about the attribute disabled, but is it possible to specify this in a CSS rule? Something like -

<input type="text" name="username" value="admin" >
<style type="text/css">
  input[name=username] {
    disabled: true; /* Does not work */
  }
</style>

The reason I'm asking is that I have an application where the form fields are autogenerated, and fields are hidden/shown based on some rules (which run in Javascript). Now I want to extend it to support disabling/enabling fields, but the way the rules are written to directly manipulate the style properties of the form fields. So now I have to extend the rule engine to change attributes as well as the style of form fields and somehow it seems less than ideal.

It's very curious that you have visible and display properties in CSS but not enable/disable. Is there anything like it in the still-under-works HTML5 standard, or even something non-standard (browser-specific)?

1
  • 1
    pointer-events: none isn't equivalent to disabling the field by setting the disabled attribute! You can still manipulate the field via the keyboard (tab into it, type into text fields, toggle checkboxes and radio boxes, activate buttons, etc), and the value is still submitted when the input's form is submitted. The only thing it does is prevent clicking/tapping on the field, that's it. As the original poster is asking for some way to use CSS instead of setting the disabled attribute, any answer that suggests pointer-events: none is simply wrong.
    – blm
    Commented Dec 5, 2022 at 22:45

15 Answers 15

220

You can fake the disabled effect using CSS.

pointer-events:none;

You might also want to change colors etc.

6
  • 95
    This helps, but doesn't prevent tabbing into the fields.
    – jerwood
    Commented Aug 8, 2014 at 19:09
  • I wanted to "disable" the last link of a breadcrumb, and I wasn't with this workaround in mind... thanks to this with some color change and without underline, it made the trick! :D Commented Apr 9, 2015 at 21:59
  • 7
    This also does not prevent form values from being submitted. Commented Feb 10, 2017 at 7:47
  • 1
    @KenWayneVanderLinde neither does the disabled attribute right?
    – minseong
    Commented Jan 18, 2018 at 12:47
  • 5
    @minseong Disabled <input> elements in a form will not be submitted. Commented Mar 13, 2018 at 4:03
155

The CSS property-value pair pointer-events: none will disable clicking to select the element:

input[name=username] {
    pointer-events: none;
}
<input type="text" name="username" value="admin">

and if you want to disable tabbing via the tab index, set tab-index="1":

input[name=username] {
    pointer-events: none;
}
<input type="text" name="username" value="admin" tabindex="-1" >

1
  • 4
    That looked like just what I was after to disable all my input fields but, although it blocks them from mouse events, they can still be accessed and changed using keyboard tab
    – Ken
    Commented Oct 20, 2015 at 15:18
116

Since the rules are running in JavaScript, why not disable them using javascript (or in my examples case, jQuery)?

$('#fieldId').attr('disabled', 'disabled'); //Disable
$('#fieldId').removeAttr('disabled'); //Enable

UPDATE

The attr function is no longer the primary approach to this, as was pointed out in the comments below. This is now done with the prop function.

$( "input" ).prop( "disabled", true ); //Disable
$( "input" ).prop( "disabled", false ); //Enable
10
  • 1
    Shouldn't that be $('#filedId').removeAttr('disabled'); // Enable
    – user348716
    Commented May 11, 2011 at 11:33
  • 8
    It is probably worth noting that this solution won't work if the user has disabled JavaScript. Commented Apr 18, 2013 at 0:02
  • 3
    FYI - the jQuery documentation suggests using .prop() instead of .attr() for this case. "As of jQuery 1.6, the .attr() method returns undefined for attributes that have not been set. To retrieve and change DOM properties such as the checked, selected, or disabled state of form elements, use the .prop() method." Source Documentation: .attr() and .prop() Commented May 11, 2015 at 19:58
  • 2
    Important: Elements with disabled attribute are not submitted - their values are not posted to the server. Read on: stackoverflow.com/q/8925716/1066234
    – Avatar
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 15:44
  • 2
    Didn't author specifically ask for CSS solution?
    – Klesun
    Commented Jun 7, 2019 at 16:17
66

It's very curious that you have visible and display properties in CSS but not enable/disable.

You're misunderstanding the purpose of CSS. CSS is not meant to change the behavior of form elements. It's meant to change their style only. Hiding a text field doesn't mean the text field is no longer there or that the browser won't send its data when you submit the form. All it does is hide it from the user's eyes.

To actually disable your fields, you must use the disabled attribute in HTML or the disabled DOM property in JavaScript.

10
  • 41
    Of course I know what CSS is "supposedly" for. But for modern webapps the distinction between "presentation" and "behaviour" is muddier than mud. Since disabled fields are not submitted to the server, it's a behaviour change. But then how is hiding all the form fields not one?! Perhaps in the good old days when all you could do on the web is read text and fill up forms, the distinction was clearer. In the modern webapp, if you want to separate presentation from behaviour, CSS versus HTML/JS is the wrong way to do it.
    – user348716
    Commented May 11, 2011 at 11:58
  • 22
    disabled is a state, not a behavior. What he's asking for is perfectly reasonable. For instance, you might want to add a busy class to multiple fields while data is being processed. Furthermore, the W3C seems to agree since it allows CSS selection of elements via the disabled pseudo class.
    – IAmNaN
    Commented Aug 29, 2013 at 20:58
  • 4
    @IAmNaN: 1) "disabled is a state, not a behavior." So is just about every other HTML/DOM attribute. 2) "For instance, you might want to add a busy class to multiple fields while data is being processed." You do that in a script. 3) "Furthermore, the W3C seems to agree since it allows CSS selection of elements via the disabled pseudo class." Being able to select an element based on whether it's enabled or disabled has nothing to do with being able to change that state using CSS.
    – BoltClock
    Commented Aug 30, 2013 at 7:30
  • 7
    There are many things in CSS that actually could be considered to be changes in behavior e.g. pointer-events:none; mentioned by @ANaimi. So disabled could be easily considered to be display property as well. Too bad it is not, would make few things easier. Commented Sep 3, 2014 at 7:43
  • 3
    The problem is with religiously deeming CSS to be purely and only relevant to visual styling for no reason other than that's how it was taught to you and that's how you understand it. Sure that is its intent, but technically speaking, CSS is a declarative rule engine, and arguing that you should use flawed imperative programming methods for things that declarative rule engines are perfect for just because they don't meet your arbitrary classification as being "visual" is silly.
    – devios1
    Commented Jun 15, 2017 at 16:08
24

You can't use CSS to disable Textbox. solution would be HTML Attribute.

disabled="disabled"
3
  • While this does work in principle, if you read the full question it says the form field are being auto generated, and then need to be disabled afterwards.
    – thelem
    Commented Sep 22, 2014 at 15:07
  • 1
    @mr_eclair. it is possible using ---> pointer-events: none; Css property.
    – fbarikzehy
    Commented Jun 10, 2015 at 10:17
  • 3
    Note: Elements with disabled attribute are not submitted - their values are not posted to the server. Read on: stackoverflow.com/q/8925716/1066234
    – Avatar
    Commented Dec 10, 2015 at 15:45
21

I am always using:

input.disabled {
  pointer-events:none;
  color:#AAA;
  background:#F5F5F5;
}

and then applying the css class to the input field:

<input class="disabled" type="text" value="90" name="myinput" id="myinput">
18

The practical solution is to use CSS to actually hide the input.

To take this to its natural conclusion, you can write two html inputs for each actual input (one enabled, and one disabled) and then use javascript to control the CSS to show and hide them.

3
  • 5
    If your using Javascript it would make sense to just disable/enable as needed no? Commented Feb 12, 2016 at 13:16
  • Indeed, but in the context of this particular question, this might be a viable approach. Commented Feb 12, 2016 at 15:01
  • Nice, but after 2015 browsers send data from display:none inputs. I guess we can't avoid the javascript here.
    – Simon
    Commented Feb 25, 2021 at 22:58
12

first time answering something, and seemingly just a bit late...

I agree to do it by javascript, if you're already using it.

For a composite structure, like I usually use, I've made a css pseudo after element to block the elements from user interaction, and allow styling without having to manipulate the entire structure.

For Example:

<div id=test class=stdInput>
    <label class=stdInputLabel for=selecterthingy>A label for this input</label>
    <label class=selectWrapper>
         <select id=selecterthingy>
             <option selected disabled>Placeholder</option>
             <option value=1>Option 1</option>
             <option value=2>Option 2</option>
         </select>
    </label>
</div>

I can place a disabled class on the wrapping div

.disabled { 
    position : relative; 
    color    : grey;
}
.disabled:after {
    position :absolute;
    left     : 0;
    top      : 0;
    width    : 100%;
    height   : 100%;
    content  :' ';
}

This would grey text within the div and make it unusable to the user.

My example JSFiddle

4
  • 5
    BTW: You still need to handle tabbing which still allows the user to get to the field and change it.
    – K Kimble
    Commented Nov 25, 2013 at 18:59
  • 2
    so shouldn't the <select> have a class="disabled"?
    – TimoSolo
    Commented Nov 28, 2013 at 9:04
  • This is brilliant I knew there was something like this. :) thanks Commented Jan 11, 2018 at 5:30
  • This is really useful. I know using javascript to set disabled would be better, but this solves my problem of making it clear to users (in addition to an error message) that submitting won't work.
    – jerclarke
    Commented Mar 30, 2019 at 0:22
10

input[name=username] { disabled: true; /* Does not work */ }

I know this question is quite old but for other users who come across this problem, I suppose the easiest way to disable input is simply by ':disabled'

<input type="text" name="username" value="admin" disabled />
<style type="text/css">
  input[name=username]:disabled {
    opacity: 0.5 !important; /* Fade effect */
    cursor: not-allowed; /* Cursor change to disabled state*/
  }
</style>

In reality, if you have some script to disable the input dynamically/automatically with javascript or jquery that would automatically disable based on the condition you add.

In jQuery for Example:

if (condition) {
// Make this input prop disabled state
  $('input').prop('disabled', true);
}
else {
// Do something else
}

Hope the answer in CSS helps.

1
  • keep in mind that if you use "disabled" on an input it will not be submitted to a form
    – ddruganov
    Commented Oct 6, 2020 at 13:02
3

You cannot do that I'm afraid, but you can do the following in jQuery, if you don't want to add the attributes to the fields. Just place this inside your <head></head> tag

$(document).ready(function(){ 
  $(".inputClass").focus(function(){
    $(this).blur();
  }); 
});

If you are generating the fields in the DOM (with JS), you should do this instead:

$(document).ready(function(){ 
  $(document).on("focus", ".inputClass", function(){
    $(this).blur();
  }); 
});
1

This can be done for a non-critical purpose by putting an overlay on top of your input element. Here's my example in pure HTML and CSS.

https://jsfiddle.net/1tL40L99/

    <div id="container">
        <input name="name" type="text" value="Text input here" />
        <span id="overlay"></span>
    </div>

    <style>
        #container {
            width: 300px;
            height: 50px;
            position: relative;
        }
        #container input[type="text"] {
            position: relative;
            top: 15px;
            z-index: 1;
            width: 200px;
            display: block;
            margin: 0 auto;
        }
        #container #overlay {
            width: 300px;
            height: 50px;
            position: absolute;
            top: 0px;
            left: 0px;
            z-index: 2;
            background: rgba(255,0,0, .5);
        }
    </style>
1

There's no way to use CSS for this purpose. My advice is to include a javascript code where you assign or change the css class applied to the inputs. Something like that :

function change_input() {
	$('#id_input1')
		.toggleClass('class_disabled')
		.toggleClass('class_enabled');
		
	$('.class_disabled').attr('disabled', '');
	$('.class_enabled').removeAttr('disabled', '');
}
.class_disabled { background-color : #FF0000; }
.class_enabled { background-color : #00FF00; }
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.11.0/jquery.min.js"></script>
<form> 	
	Input: <input id="id_input1" class="class_enabled" />		
	<input type="button" value="Toggle" onclick="change_input()";/>	
</form>

1

A variation to the pointer-events: none; solution, which resolves the issue of the input still being accessible via it's labeled control or tabindex, is to wrap the input in a div, which is styled as a disabled text input, and setting input { visibility: hidden; } when the input is "disabled".
Ref: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/visibility#Values

div.dependant {
  border: 0.1px solid rgb(170, 170, 170);
  background-color: rgb(235,235,228);
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
input[type="checkbox"]:not(:checked) ~ div.dependant:first-of-type {
  display: inline-block;
}
input[type="checkbox"]:checked ~ div.dependant:first-of-type {
  display: contents;
}
input[type="checkbox"]:not(:checked) ~ div.dependant:first-of-type > input {
  visibility: hidden;
}
<form>
  <label for="chk1">Enable textbox?</label>
  <input id="chk1" type="checkbox" />
  <br />
  <label for="text1">Input textbox label</label>
  <div class="dependant">
    <input id="text1" type="text" />
  </div>
</form>

The disabled styling applied in the snippet above is taken from the Chrome UI and may not be visually identical to disabled inputs on other browsers. Possibly it can be customised for individual browsers using engine-specific CSS extension -prefixes. Though at a glance, I don't think it could:
Microsoft CSS extensions, Mozilla CSS extensions, WebKit CSS extensions

It would seem far more sensible to introduce an additional value visibility: disabled or display: disabled or perhaps even appearance: disabled, given that visibility: hidden already affects the behavior of the applicable elements any associated control elements.

0

using javascript:

var element = document.getElementById("formElement1");
        element.disabled = true;
0

Using CSS properties, we can easily manipulate the label and the input.

For example:

html {
  font-size: 45px;
  --pointer-event: none;
  --message: "NOT CLICKABLE";
}
.element label, .element label input {
    pointer-events: var(--pointer-events);
}
.element label::after {
    content: var(--message);    
}
.element label { 
  user-select: none;
  animation-duration: 10s;
  animation-name: blink;
  animation-timing-function: linear;
  animation-iteration-count: infinite;
  animation-direction: alternate;
  display: block;
  width: 600px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: #FFDDDD;
  border-color: black;
  border-style: solid;
  border-width: 2px;
}

@keyframes blink {
    0% {
        --pointer-event: all;
        --message: "CLICKABLE";
      color: blue;
    }
    60% {
      --pointer-event: none;
      --message: "NOT CLICKABLE";
      color: red;
    }
    80% {
      --pointer-events: none;
      --message: "NOT CLICKABLE";
      color: red;
    }
    100% {
      --pointer-events: all;
      --message: "CLICKABLE";
      color: blue;
    }
}
<div class="element">
  <label>
    <input type="checkbox">
    Click me
  </label>
</div>