982

I'd like to convert a float to a whole number in JavaScript. Actually, I'd like to know how to do BOTH of the standard conversions: by truncating and by rounding. And efficiently, not via converting to a string and parsing.

  • 77
    If you didn't know it, all numbers in javascript are floats. From the specification: – some Feb 28 '09 at 2:40
  • 6
    4.3.20 Number Type: The type Number is a set of values representing numbers. In ECMAScript, the set of values represents the doubleprecision 64-bit format IEEE 754 values including the special “Not-a-Number” (NaN) values, positive infinity, and negative infinity. – some Feb 28 '09 at 2:41
  • 8
    Yes, Javascript does not have a distinct "integer" type, but it is still not uncommon to need to do this conversion. For instance, in my application users typed in a number (possibly including cents). I had to truncate the cents and display w/ commas. Step 1 was to convert to int. – mcherm Feb 28 '09 at 15:40
  • 1
    also useful: speed comparison of all methods jsperf.com/math-floor-vs-math-round-vs-parseint/33 – c.. Jul 26 '12 at 18:10
  • 1
    @karl: If I'm accepting input into a field, I might be able to control what characters I accept, but I could be doing all kinds of processing in Javascript, not just accepting user input. Even then I might want it for things like supporting paste. – mcherm Oct 30 '12 at 16:55

14 Answers 14

1399
var intvalue = Math.floor( floatvalue );
var intvalue = Math.ceil( floatvalue ); 
var intvalue = Math.round( floatvalue );

// `Math.trunc` was added in ECMAScript 6
var intvalue = Math.trunc( floatvalue );

Math object reference


Examples

Positive
// value=x        //  x=5          5<x<5.5      5.5<=x<6  

Math.floor(value) //  5            5            5
Math.ceil(value)  //  5            6            6
Math.round(value) //  5            5            6
Math.trunc(value) //  5            5            5
parseInt(value)   //  5            5            5
~~value           //  5            5            5
value | 0         //  5            5            5
value >> 0        //  5            5            5
value >>> 0       //  5            5            5
value - value % 1 //  5            5            5
Negative
// value=x        // x=-5         -5>x>=-5.5   -5.5>x>-6

Math.floor(value) // -5           -6           -6
Math.ceil(value)  // -5           -5           -5
Math.round(value) // -5           -5           -6
Math.trunc(value) // -5           -5           -5
parseInt(value)   // -5           -5           -5
value | 0         // -5           -5           -5
~~value           // -5           -5           -5
value >> 0        // -5           -5           -5
value >>> 0       // 4294967291   4294967291   4294967291
value - value % 1 // -5           -5           -5
Positive - Larger numbers
// x = Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER/10 // =900719925474099.1

// value=x            x=900719925474099    x=900719925474099.4  x=900719925474099.5

Math.floor(value) //  900719925474099      900719925474099      900719925474099
Math.ceil(value)  //  900719925474099      900719925474100      900719925474100
Math.round(value) //  900719925474099      900719925474099      900719925474100
Math.trunc(value) //  900719925474099      900719925474099      900719925474099
parseInt(value)   //  900719925474099      900719925474099      900719925474099
value | 0         //  858993459            858993459            858993459
~~value           //  858993459            858993459            858993459
value >> 0        //  858993459            858993459            858993459
value >>> 0       //  858993459            858993459            858993459
value - value % 1 //  900719925474099      900719925474099      900719925474099
Negative - Larger numbers
// x = Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER/10 * -1 // -900719925474099.1

// value = x      // x=-900719925474099   x=-900719925474099.5 x=-900719925474099.6

Math.floor(value) // -900719925474099     -900719925474100     -900719925474100
Math.ceil(value)  // -900719925474099     -900719925474099     -900719925474099
Math.round(value) // -900719925474099     -900719925474099     -900719925474100
Math.trunc(value) // -900719925474099     -900719925474099     -900719925474099
parseInt(value)   // -900719925474099     -900719925474099     -900719925474099
value | 0         // -858993459           -858993459           -858993459
~~value           // -858993459           -858993459           -858993459
value >> 0        // -858993459           -858993459           -858993459
value >>> 0       //  3435973837           3435973837           3435973837
value - value % 1 // -900719925474099     -900719925474099     -900719925474099
  • 76
    As mentioned in another answer, a negative-safe truncate can be done using var intValue = ~~floatValue;. If the notation is too obscure for your tastes, just hide it in a function: function toInt(value) { return ~~value; }. (This also converts strings to integers, if you care to do so.) – Keen Apr 19 '13 at 19:08
  • 3
    Would upvote if this answer had example input/output. – J. Random Coder Aug 27 '15 at 14:40
  • 7
    Regarding the comment ~~ limits the value to 32 bit signed integers, while Math.floor/ceil/round can handle up to 53-bit (Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER 9007199254740991). This is mentioned in the answer below, but it is worth repeating here for those reading these comments. – John Mar 28 '16 at 15:27
  • 2
    Read from below in several places: Math.trunc(val); Comment because this is the accepted answer – Old Badman Grey May 5 '16 at 6:05
  • Does not work with exact precision for values like 2.3 - 2.3 % 1 – Lapys Nov 6 '18 at 23:31
283

Bitwise OR operator

A bitwise or operator can be used to truncate floating point figures and it works for positives as well as negatives:

function float2int (value) {
    return value | 0;
}

Results

float2int(3.1) == 3
float2int(-3.1) == -3
float2int(3.9) == 3
float2int(-3.9) == -3

Performance comparison?

I've created a JSPerf test that compares performance between:

  • Math.floor(val)
  • val | 0 bitwise OR
  • ~~val bitwise NOT
  • parseInt(val)

that only works with positive numbers. In this case you're safe to use bitwise operations well as Math.floor function.

But if you need your code to work with positives as well as negatives, then a bitwise operation is the fastest (OR being the preferred one). This other JSPerf test compares the same where it's pretty obvious that because of the additional sign checking Math is now the slowest of the four.

Note

As stated in comments, BITWISE operators operate on signed 32bit integers, therefore large numbers will be converted, example:

1234567890  | 0 => 1234567890
12345678901 | 0 => -539222987
  • 7
    Thanks for the performance comparison – Display name Jan 9 '13 at 16:57
  • 4
    That's so simple. Great way! – Fabio Poloni Jan 10 '13 at 13:25
  • 3
    @RobertKoritnik I just don't understand how it works ;) – Fabio Poloni Jan 10 '13 at 14:35
  • 9
    @thefourtheye: All bitwise operations except unsigned right shift, work on signed 32-bit integers. Therefore using bitwise operations on floating point values will convert them to an integer stripping off digits after decimal point. – Robert Koritnik Sep 2 '13 at 12:22
  • 8
    Note that the bitwise operators operate on 32 bit numbers. They won't work for numbers too large to fit in 32 bits. – Kat Oct 31 '13 at 0:09
92

Note: You cannot use Math.floor() as a replacement for truncate, because Math.floor(-3.1) = -4 and not -3 !!

A correct replacement for truncate would be:

function truncate(value)
{
    if (value < 0) {
        return Math.ceil(value);
    }

    return Math.floor(value);
}
  • 1
    That depends on the desired behavior for negative numbers. Some uses need negative numbers to map to the more negative value (-3.5 -> -4) and some require them to map to the smaller integer (-3.5 -> -3). The former is normally called "floor". The word "truncate" is often used to describe either behavior. In my case, I was only going to feed it negative numbers. But this comment is a useful warning for those who DO care about negative number behavior. – mcherm Oct 16 '09 at 14:35
  • 26
    @mcherm: Then they do not seem to understand the term "truncate" correctly. Truncate does exactly as its name implies: it truncates digits. It is never (in the general sense) equivalent to floor or ceil. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truncation – Thanatos Apr 16 '12 at 7:18
  • 4
    Math.trunc(value) was added in ECMAScript 6 – 4esn0k Jul 31 '14 at 5:49
  • 2
    floor rounds towards -infinity, truncate rounds towards zero. (ceil rounds towards +infinity). – Peter Cordes Apr 24 '17 at 0:03
42

A double bitwise not operator can be used to truncate floats. The other operations you mentioned are available through Math.floor, Math.ceil, and Math.round.

> ~~2.5
2
> ~~(-1.4)
-1

More details courtesy of James Padolsey.

  • 1
    This is probably a bad thing to do for production code (since it's obscure) but it was exactly what I needed for code-golfing my <canvas> font rendering engine in JS. Thank you! – Kragen Javier Sitaker Feb 6 '12 at 20:31
  • 10
    This can also be accomplished with n | 0. – Jay Douglass Mar 20 '12 at 23:48
  • 17
    Note that either method (~~n or n|0) only work on numbers up to 2^31-1, or 2147483647. 2147483648 or higher will return an incorrect result; for example, 2147483647|0 returns -2147483648, and 4294967295|0 returns -1, which is almost definitely not what you want. – Ed Bayiates Oct 22 '12 at 18:36
39

For truncate:

var intvalue = Math.floor(value);

For round:

var intvalue = Math.round(value);
  • stackoverflow is very unfreindly to slow types, nice answer anyway :-) – dpavlin May 20 '10 at 20:26
  • Thanks buddy. :) I was a few seconds off from moonshadow who gets all the credit! :p Guess you are right. – Mike May 22 '10 at 20:25
  • 6
    Math.floor does not truncate negative values. See answer above. Otherwise nice answer. – oligofren May 4 '12 at 14:47
  • If you're interested in performance I've put a small test case here: jsperf.com/dsafdgdfsaf/2 (var | 0 wins here). – Cybolic Jun 15 '12 at 23:54
24

You can use the parseInt method for no rounding. Be careful with user input due to the 0x (hex) and 0 (octal) prefix options.

var intValue = parseInt(floatValue, 10);
  • 1
    This is actually helpful when you just want the integer part of a decimal, without rounding up or down, which is what .round, .ceil, and .floor all do. – Judah Gabriel Himango Jan 30 '12 at 20:08
  • 1
    ...even when simply truncating this seems to be the slowest method. jsperf.com/float-to-int-conversion-comparison – Robert Koritnik Oct 11 '12 at 10:34
  • 1
    Always pass the 2nd value to parseInt to specify what base you're expecting. So, parseInt(floatValue, 10) to always get base 10. – Tim Tisdall Feb 22 '13 at 16:52
  • 3
    Though this is old, this question seems to be one that's quite often asked, so I'll put this here as a warning. If the value would be represented using "e" notation because of its size, it will just result in one digit, not what is expected. For example, parseInt(1000000000000000000000, 10); results in 1, not 1 000 000 000 000 000 000 000. Anyway, the question explicitly did not want "converting to a string and parsing", though that's relatively minor... ;) – Qantas 94 Heavy Nov 28 '13 at 2:04
  • 4
    @Qantas94Heavy The reason for this behaviour, is because parseInt() expects a string not a number as its first parameter. When you pass this integer, it is converted to 1e21 and then parseInt parses the string 1e21, which results in 1. – Olaf Dietsche Jan 9 '14 at 20:56
17

Bit shift by 0 which is equivalent to division by 1

// >> or >>>
2.0 >> 0; // 2
2.0 >>> 0; // 2
  • 3
    Why does it work? – thefourtheye Sep 2 '13 at 11:18
  • 4
    Small note: >> 0 seems to only work for integers < 2^31-1, and >>> 0 for integers < 2^32-1. This returns 0 for larger values – Romuald Brunet Apr 23 '14 at 10:02
  • @RomualdBrunet, yes, JavaScript clearly defines all the bitwise operations as operating on 32 bit numbers. That's in the specs. – Alexis Wilke May 24 '14 at 2:51
  • This works as Javascript does bitwise operations only with 32bit (signed) integers as stated in an answer above. So any bit-operation that seems to do nothing (like a shift for 0, OR with 0, AND with 1, double NOT) still needs Javascript interpreter to convert the value to 32bit int. – FrankKrumnow Apr 25 '18 at 11:14
8

In your case, when you want a string in the end (in order to insert commas), you can also just use the Number.toFixed() function, however, this will perform rounding.

6

There are many suggestions here. The bitwise OR seems to be the simplest by far. Here is another short solution which works with negative numbers as well using the modulo operator. It is probably easier to understand than the bitwise OR:

intval = floatval - floatval%1;

This method also works with high value numbers where neither '|0' nor '~~' nor '>>0' work correctly:

> n=4294967295;
> n|0
-1
> ~~n
-1
> n>>0
-1
> n-n%1
4294967295
  • If you refer to another answer, please either add a reference to it or shortly sketch its idea. – bertl Jul 11 '13 at 14:06
5

One more possible way — use XOR operation:

console.log(12.3 ^ 0); // 12
console.log("12.3" ^ 0); // 12
console.log(1.2 + 1.3 ^ 0); // 2
console.log(1.2 + 1.3 * 2 ^ 0); // 3
console.log(-1.2 ^ 0); // -1
console.log(-1.2 + 1 ^ 0); // 0
console.log(-1.2 - 1.3 ^ 0); // -2

Priority of bitwise operations is less then priority of math operations, it's useful. Try on https://jsfiddle.net/au51uj3r/

1

To truncate:

// Math.trunc() is part of the ES6 spec
Math.trunc( 1.5 );  // returns 1
Math.trunc( -1.5 ); // returns -1
// Math.floor( -1.5 ) would return -2, which is probably not what you wanted

To round:

Math.round( 1.5 );  // 2
Math.round( 1.49 ); // 1
Math.round( -1.6 ); // -2
Math.round( -1.3 ); // -1
  • What does this add to the top answer? – Dan Dascalescu Jan 19 at 18:10
  • @DanDascalescu check the edit history. When I added this answer with Math.trunc the top answer didn't have that yet. – Razor Jan 20 at 22:51
  • But now it does. Any reason to keep the answer? – Dan Dascalescu Jan 20 at 23:59
1

If look into native Math object in JavaScript, you get the whole bunch of functions to work on numbers and values, etc...

Basically what you want to do is quite simple and native in JavaScript...

Imagine you have the number below:

const myValue = 56.4534931;

and now if you want to round it down to the nearest number, just simply do:

const rounded = Math.floor(myValue);

and you get:

56

If you want to round it up to the nearest number, just do:

const roundedUp = Math.ceil(myValue);

and you get:

57

Also Math.round just round it to higher or lower number depends on which one is closer to the flot number.

Also you can use of ~~ behind the float number, that will convert a float to a whole number.

You can use it like ~~myValue...

0

I just want to point out that monetarily you want to round, and not trunc. Being off by a penny is much less likely, since 4.999452 * 100 rounded will give you 5, a more representative answer.

And on top of that, don't forget about banker's rounding, which is a way to counter the slightly positive bias that straight rounding gives -- your financial application may require it.

Gaussian/banker's rounding in JavaScript

0

If you are using angularjs then simple solution as follows In HTML Template Binding

{{val | number:0}}

it will convert val into integer

go through with this link docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/filter/number

protected by Ramesh Rajendran May 31 at 5:22

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