16

When having a Pandas DataFrame like this:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df = pd.DataFrame({'today': [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b'], ['b']], 
                   'yesterday': [['a', 'b'], ['a'], ['a']]})
                 today        yesterday
0      ['a', 'b', 'c']       ['a', 'b']
1           ['a', 'b']            ['a']
2                ['b']            ['a']                          
... etc

But with about 100 000 entries, I am looking to find the additions and removals of those lists in the two columns on a row-wise basis.

It is comparable to this question: Pandas: How to Compare Columns of Lists Row-wise in a DataFrame with Pandas (not for loop)? but I am looking at the differences, and Pandas.apply method seems not to be that fast for such many entries. This is the code that I am currently using. Pandas.apply with numpy's setdiff1d method:

additions = df.apply(lambda row: np.setdiff1d(row.today, row.yesterday), axis=1)
removals  = df.apply(lambda row: np.setdiff1d(row.yesterday, row.today), axis=1)

This works fine, however it takes about a minute for 120 000 entries. So is there a faster way to accomplish this?

4
  • How many items at max (in a single row) one of these columns might hold? – thushv89 Jan 8 '20 at 19:59
  • 2
    have you tried the methods in that post that you linked? specifically the ones that use set intersection, all you would have to do is use set difference instead, no? – gold_cy Jan 8 '20 at 20:00
  • 1
    @aws_apprentice that solution is essentially what OP has here. – Quang Hoang Jan 8 '20 at 20:06
  • A Pandas DataFrame may not be the right data structure for this. Can you share a bit more background on the program and the data? – AMC Jan 8 '20 at 20:14
15

Not sure about performance, but at the lack of a better solution this might apply:

temp = df[['today', 'yesterday']].applymap(set)
removals = temp.diff(periods=1, axis=1).dropna(axis=1)
additions = temp.diff(periods=-1, axis=1).dropna(axis=1) 

Removals:

  yesterday
0        {}
1        {}
2       {a}

Additions:

  today
0   {c}
1   {b}
2   {b}
4
  • 2
    This is very fast. – rpanai Jan 8 '20 at 20:23
  • 2
    This is indeed very fast. It came down to about 2 seconds! – MegaCookie Jan 8 '20 at 20:31
  • 2
    Wow, I'm surprised by the performance as well due to applymap, but glad it worked out for you! – r.ook Jan 8 '20 at 20:33
  • 2
    Now, as we know rook's solution is fast, Can someone explain to me. Why it was faster? – Grijesh Chauhan Jan 9 '20 at 6:10
7
df['today'].apply(set) - df['yesterday'].apply(set)
1
  • Thanks! This is I think the most readable solution, however r.ook's solution is slightly faster. – MegaCookie Jan 8 '20 at 20:30
5

I will suggest you to calculate additions and removals within the same apply.

Generate a bigger example

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
df = pd.DataFrame({'today': [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b'], ['b']], 
                   'yesterday': [['a', 'b'], ['a'], ['a']]})
df = pd.concat([df for i in range(10_000)], ignore_index=True)

Your solution

%%time
additions = df.apply(lambda row: np.setdiff1d(row.today, row.yesterday), axis=1)
removals  = df.apply(lambda row: np.setdiff1d(row.yesterday, row.today), axis=1)
CPU times: user 10.9 s, sys: 29.8 ms, total: 11 s
Wall time: 11 s

Your solution on a single apply

%%time
df["out"] = df.apply(lambda row: [np.setdiff1d(row.today, row.yesterday),
                                  np.setdiff1d(row.yesterday, row.today)], axis=1)
df[['additions','removals']] = pd.DataFrame(df['out'].values.tolist(), 
                                            columns=['additions','removals'])
df = df.drop("out", axis=1)

CPU times: user 4.97 s, sys: 16 ms, total: 4.99 s
Wall time: 4.99 s

Using set

Unless your lists are very big you can avoid numpy

def fun(x):
    a = list(set(x["today"]).difference(set(x["yesterday"])))
    b = list((set(x["yesterday"])).difference(set(x["today"])))
    return [a,b]

%%time
df["out"] = df.apply(fun, axis=1)
df[['additions','removals']] = pd.DataFrame(df['out'].values.tolist(), 
                                            columns=['additions','removals'])
df = df.drop("out", axis=1)

CPU times: user 1.56 s, sys: 0 ns, total: 1.56 s
Wall time: 1.56 s

@r.ook's solution

If you're happy having sets instead of lists as output you can use @r.ook's code

%%time
temp = df[['today', 'yesterday']].applymap(set)
removals = temp.diff(periods=1, axis=1).dropna(axis=1)
additions = temp.diff(periods=-1, axis=1).dropna(axis=1) 
CPU times: user 93.1 ms, sys: 12 ms, total: 105 ms
Wall time: 104 ms

@Andreas K.'s solution

%%time
df['additions'] = (df['today'].apply(set) - df['yesterday'].apply(set))
df['removals'] = (df['yesterday'].apply(set) - df['today'].apply(set))

CPU times: user 161 ms, sys: 28.1 ms, total: 189 ms
Wall time: 187 ms

and you can eventually add .apply(list) to get your same output

1
  • 1
    Cool comparison that you did! – MegaCookie Jan 8 '20 at 20:33
1

Here's one with the idea of offloading compute part to vectorized NumPy tools. We will gather all of the data to single arrays for each header, perform all of the required matching on NumPy and finally slice back to required row entries. On the NumPy that does the heavy lifting part, we will use hashing based on group IDs and IDs within each group using np.searchsorted. We are also making use of numbers as those are faster with NumPy. The implementation would look something like this -

t = df['today']
y = df['yesterday']
tc = np.concatenate(t)
yc = np.concatenate(y)

tci,tcu = pd.factorize(tc)

tl = np.array(list(map(len,t)))
ty = np.array(list(map(len,y)))

grp_t = np.repeat(np.arange(len(tl)),tl)
grp_y = np.repeat(np.arange(len(ty)),ty)

sidx = tcu.argsort()
idx = sidx[np.searchsorted(tcu,yc,sorter=sidx)]

s = max(tci.max(), idx.max())+1
tID = grp_t*s+tci
yID = grp_y*s+idx

t_mask = np.isin(tID, yID, invert=True)
y_mask = np.isin(yID, tID, invert=True)

t_se = np.r_[0,np.bincount(grp_t,t_mask).astype(int).cumsum()]
y_se = np.r_[0,np.bincount(grp_y,y_mask).astype(int).cumsum()]

Y = yc[y_mask].tolist()
T = tc[t_mask].tolist()

A = pd.Series([T[i:j] for (i,j) in zip(t_se[:-1],t_se[1:])])
R = pd.Series([Y[i:j] for (i,j) in zip(y_se[:-1],y_se[1:])])

Further optimization is possible at the steps to compute t_mask and y_mask, where np.searchsorted could be used again.

We could also use a simple array-assignment as an alternative to the isin step to get t_mask and y_mask, like so -

M = max(tID.max(), yID.max())+1
mask = np.empty(M, dtype=bool)

mask[tID] = True
mask[yID] = False
t_mask = mask[tID]

mask[yID] = True
mask[tID] = False
y_mask = mask[yID]
1

Your Solution

%timeit additions = df.apply(lambda row: np.setdiff1d(row.today, row.yesterday), axis=1)

590 µs ± 13 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

%timeit removals  = df.apply(lambda row: np.setdiff1d(row.yesterday, row.today), axis=1)

609 µs ± 28 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

Use map function or numpy vectorize for better performance,their are some case where map function fails.

By using numpy vectorize function

vector = np.vectorize(lambda x,y:set(x)-set(y))
%timeit additions = vector(df.today,df.yesterday)

56.6 µs ± 256 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each

%timeit removals = vector(df.yesterday,df.today)

58.1 µs ± 2.04 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

By using map function

first convert list to set

df.today = list(map(set,df.today))
df.yesterday = list(map(set,df.yesterday))

then use lambda and map function

%timeit additions = list(map(lambda x:x[0]-x[1],zip(df.today,df.yesterday)))

15.3 µs ± 1.63 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)

%timeit removals = list(map(lambda x:x[1]-x[0],zip(df.today,df.yesterday)))

15.1 µs ± 502 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)

So can use map function or np.vectorize function

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.