3

In below code, both error handlers are declared as [[noreturn]], I know if function that must return a value calls a function that throws and never returns is well defined behavior.

It would be undefined behavior if control reaches end of function f without return statement, but this is different because return never happens.

// 'function' must return a value
#pragma warning(default:4716)

class Base
{
public:
    [[noreturn]] virtual void ErrorHandler()
    {
        throw 0;
    }

    int f(int x)
    {
        if (x > 0)
            return x;
        else ErrorHandler();    // C4716
    }
};

class Derived :
    public Base
{
public:
    [[noreturn]] void ErrorHandler() override
    {
        throw 1;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Base b;
    b.f(0);

    Derived d;
    d.f(0);
}

Is this still UB, if not then why am I presented with warning?

In addition to above problem, I want a design where ErrorHandler could possibly handle exception and return control to caller, in that case how do I know if overriden handler returns or not?

For example we could just remove [[noreturn]] and assume handler may or may not return, then how to design function f? what to return if argument is zero but return value must be non zero?

Primary I want to get rid of warning and be sure the behavior is well defined, and return value must be either positive otherwise function f shall not continue.

edit

If we modify the code as having non virtual error handler, the warning is gone.

so what makes the first case raise the warning? what's the difference?

   class Base
    {
    public:
        [[noreturn]] void ErrorHandler()
        {
            throw 0;
        }

        int f(int x)
        {
            if (x > 0)
                return x;
            else ErrorHandler();    // OK
        }
    };

    class Derived :
        public Base
    {
    public:
        [[noreturn]] void ErrorHandler()
        {
            throw 1;
        }
    };

    int main()
    {
        Base b;
        b.f(0);

        Derived d;
        d.f(0);
    }
6
  • 1
    If you make the function non-virtual, then if the function gets called, it will throw. But the implementation of a virtual function can be replaced by any inheriting class. How could the compiler ever know if one of these overriding functions possibly doesn't throw??? – Aconcagua Jan 9 '20 at 14:56
  • 1
    @Aconcagua Please write an answer! You are correct and none of the existing answers address the fact that [[noreturn]] is not part of the function signature, i.e. that this is legal: godbolt.org/z/3m72n9 – Max Langhof Jan 9 '20 at 15:06
  • 1
    See also stackoverflow.com/questions/32655526/…. – Max Langhof Jan 9 '20 at 15:12
  • 1
    @MaxLanghof so this is the same problem as with virtual functions with default parameters (default parameters not inherited). therefore the safest way is to avoid [[noreturn]] attribute on virtuals (as well as it's the best to avoid default params on virtuals)? – metablaster Jan 9 '20 at 15:16
  • 1
    @metablaster That would be my conclusion, yes. – Max Langhof Jan 9 '20 at 15:29
3

The compiler knows something you do not. [[noreturn]] is not part of a method signature, so overriding methods in derived classes are free to return.

// 'function' must return a value
#pragma warning(default:4716)

class Base
{
public:
    [[noreturn]] virtual void ErrorHandler()
    {
        throw 0;
    }

    int f(int x)
    {
        if (x > 0)
            return x;
        else ErrorHandler();    // C4716
    }
};

class Derived :
    public Base
{
public:
    [[noreturn]] void ErrorHandler() final // FINAL is key
    {
        throw 1;
    }

    int f(int x)
    {
        if (x > 0)
            return x;
        else ErrorHandler();    // No C4716 here!
    }
};

class Derived2 :
    public Base
{
public:
    void ErrorHandler() override
    {
      return; // AHA!  ErrorHandler returns!
    }
};


int main()
{
    Base b;
    b.f(0);

    Derived d;
    d.f(0);

    Derived2 d2;
    d2.f(0);
}

here I have created an additional derived class, and added a method f to Derived.

The only warning I get is:

<source>(17) : warning C4715: 'Base::f': not all control paths return a value

it correctly deduces that Derived::f (a copy of Base::f) does not have this problem.

The issue in Base::f is illustrated by Derived2 -- in it, ErrorHandler has been overridden without the [[noreturn]] attribute. Attributes are not part of method signatures.

So a virtual ErrorHandler that is [[noreturn]] can be overridden by one that does return. This would cause f to exhibit undefined behavior.

When, in Derived, I mark ErrorHandler as final, the f there cannot exhibit undefined behavior (as there is no way to override ErrorHandler with a non-[[noreturn]] overload). So the warning is not generated.


You can still suppress this warning, if you presume that nobody is going to override ErrorHandler with one that returns.

The cleanest way is this:

class Base
{
public:
  [[noreturn]] void DoErrorHandling() {
    ErrorHandler();
    throw 0; // or std::terminate
  }
private:
  [[noreturn]] virtual void ErrorHandler() { throw 0; }
public:
  int f(int x) {
    if (x > 0)
      return x;
    DoErrorHandling();
  }
};

Now we wrap ErrorHandler with a non-virtual DoErrorHandling method marked [[noreturn]] which, if the virtual ErrorHandler it calls doesn't throw, throws.

9
  • 1
    Instead of calling std::terminate I'd rather throw an own exception. errorHandler is virtual. How could we ever be sure, that any overriding variant will throw as well? If one doesn't, then a user could catch this other exception (just as he would have caught whatever the error handler throws), whereas there's no chance to proceed after std::terminate... – Aconcagua Jan 9 '20 at 15:01
  • yes, your second sample seems like the only way, std::terminate can be replaced with anything as Acouncagua suggests. also accepted because, in real code my ErrorHandler is only supposed to release resources before terminating the program or doing anything else. – metablaster Jan 9 '20 at 15:07
  • 2
    I don't want to downvote your answer, but as rightfully pointed out in the comments, whether "it is permitted by the standard to assume that ErrorHandler does not return" depends a lot on how virtual and [[noreturn]] are expected to interact. Seeing as the compiler won't complain about overriding a [[noreturn]] function with one that returns (godbolt.org/z/3m72n9), I disagree with this being caused by "compiler sucking" (unless you have evidence that allowing these overrides is a compiler mistake). – Max Langhof Jan 9 '20 at 15:10
  • Hate to disagree with you, but since the noreturn function is virtual, compiler as in their own right to be cautious here. – SergeyA Jan 9 '20 at 15:18
  • 1
    @metablaster Answer updated significantly, both with the observation that MSVC is smarter than both of us, and with a better way to handle the problem given that understanding. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Jan 9 '20 at 15:35
3

[[noreturn]] virtual void ErrorHandler() only tells that that function doesn't return.

I doesn't force inherited classes to "inherit" attribute.

If you want to force exception, you might return std::exception_ptr instead:

class Base
{
public:
    [[noreturn]] virtual std::exception_ptr ErrorHandler()
    {
        std::make_exception_ptr(0);
    }

    int f(int x)
    {
        if (x > 0) {
            return x;
        } else {
            auto eptr = ErrorHandler();
            if (eptr) {
                rethrow_exception(eptr);
            }
            throw "nullptr eptr";
        }
    }
};

class Derived :
    public Base
{
public:
    [[noreturn]] std::exception_ptr ErrorHandler() override
    {
        std::make_exception_ptr(1);
        // or even
        // throw 1;
    }
};
2
  • At first this looks like an elegant solution, but I find it difficult to make use of it for general purpose. mainly because parameter of std::make_exception_ptr is passed by value and is subject to object slicing. and in reality exception object doesn't necessarily need to be int. it could be derived exception class. +1 anyway. – metablaster Jan 9 '20 at 21:00
  • @metablaster: you indeed pass it by value, but there are no object slicing involved. – Jarod42 Jan 9 '20 at 21:52
0

Its as the message says compiler can't tell if control reaches the end and it return something, however with little change in if statement and failing fast.


class Base
{
public:
    [[noreturn]] virtual void ErrorHandler()
    {
        throw 0;
    }

    int f(int x)
    {
        if (x <= 0)
            ErrorHandler();
        return x;
    }
};

class Derived :
    public Base
{
public:
    [[noreturn]] void ErrorHandler() override
    {
        throw 1;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Base b;
    b.f(0);

    Derived d;
    d.f(0);
}

No warning and code compiles, compiler see there is a return statement a the end so function will return some int

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