34

How can I fix this code so it generates unique random letters and numbers in lower case?

api_string = (0...32).map{65.+(rand(25)).chr}.join    

At the moment, it generates only letters.

  • 1
    The range for numbers is 48 to 57. These must be included in your range. – soandos May 11 '11 at 15:41
  • Thanks for the answer. Can you give an example so I can mark it as correct? – donald May 11 '11 at 15:43
  • possible duplicate of How best to generate a random string in Ruby – user Mar 25 '15 at 8:20

11 Answers 11

83

If you are using ruby 1.9.2 you can use SecureRandom:

irb(main):001:0> require 'securerandom'
=> true
irb(main):002:0> SecureRandom.hex(13)
=> "5bbf194bcf8740ae8c9ce49e97"
irb(main):003:0> SecureRandom.hex(15)
=> "d2413503a9618bacfdb1745eafdb0f"
irb(main):004:0> SecureRandom.hex(32)
=> "432e0a359bbf3669e6da610d57ea5d0cd9e2fceb93e7f7989305d89e31073690"
  • 2
    This is handy for simple needs but the alpha range is only a-f, so the security/complexity of the generated string isn't as high as it could be. – John Bachir Feb 6 '13 at 10:20
  • 5
    Better to use base64, which is also built in: SecureRandom.base64(16).gsub(/=+$/,'') – Michael Chaney May 24 '13 at 4:34
  • 4
    Not an issue for an API key, but there's also the handy urlsafe_base64 method: SecureRandom.urlsafe_base64(16) => "XpMnLfc3FySd-C4V2Ipxag" – Stephen Nelson-Smith Aug 25 '13 at 13:03
  • Why is it better to use base64 – ckarbass Mar 13 '14 at 5:26
  • 8
    Even better SecureRandom.urlsafe_base64(length) – Dennis May 16 '14 at 14:03
26

All letters and digits, that's how numbers are represented in base 36.

api_string = Array.new(32){rand(36).to_s(36)}.join
  • why do you think it will always be unique ? – user1735921 Sep 28 '17 at 10:07
16

8.times.map { [*'0'..'9', *'a'..'z'].sample }.join

  • '0'..'9' generates an array from 0 to 9, and 'a'..'z' generates an array from a to z, but what exactly does the * before each of them does? – vipin8169 May 30 '16 at 12:21
  • 1
    '0'..'9' is range and * is splat operator. It splits the elements of the range into single items which are returned as a group, so basically * is helping you to separate out elements so that they can be sampled out using sample method – Anuja Joshi Jun 1 '16 at 6:34
  • thankyou for the explanation :) – vipin8169 Jun 1 '16 at 6:48
2

Here's one way to do it:

POSSIBLE = (('A'..'Z').to_a + (0..9).to_a)
api_string = (0...32).map { |n| POSSIBLE.sample }.join

If you have Active Support available you can also do this to make an API-key-like string:

ActiveSupport::SecureRandom.hex(32)
2

i forgot from where, but i've read this somehow this morning

l,m = 24,36
rand(m**l).to_s(m).rjust(l,'0')

it create random number from 0 to power(36,24), then convert it to base-36 string (that is 0-9 and a-z)

1
CHARS = (?0..?9).to_a + (?a..?z).to_a
api_string = 32.times.inject("") {|s, i| s << CHARS[rand(CHARS.size)]}
1
((('a'..'z').to_a + (0..9).to_a)*3).shuffle[0,(rand(100).to_i)].join

Replace rand(100) with rand(n) where n is the maximum length of your desired string.

1

This will generate a lower random string from 32 to 50 characters including numbers and letters, both:

require 'string_pattern'

puts "32-50:/xN/".gen
0

using SecureRandom of ruby language.

require 'securerandom' randomstring = SecureRandom.hex(5)

It will generate the n*2 random string contains “0-9″ and “a-f”

0

Newer versions of Ruby support SecureRandom.base58, which will get you much denser tokens than hex, without any special characters.

> SecureRandom.base58(24)
> "Zp9N4aYvQfz3E6CmEzkadoa2" 
-1
Process.clock_gettime(Process::CLOCK_REALTIME, :nanosecond).to_s(36)

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