184
ID   FirstName   LastName
1      John        Doe
2      Bugs        Bunny
3      John        Johnson

I want to select DISTINCT results from the FirstName column, but I need the corresponding ID and LastName.

The result set needs to show only one John, but with an ID of 1 and a LastName of Doe.

  • 1
    You want the last name belonging to the lowest ID with a distinct first name? – Thomas Langston May 11 '11 at 15:57
  • 3
    What is the logic that should go into the selection of the top one? I would think you would want both John Doe and John Johnson to show up since they are two distinct Johns but that is just me. – judda May 11 '11 at 16:00
  • 4
    DISTINCT is not a function. All answers with DISTINCT() are wrong. The error will show up when you do not place it after SELECT. – Question Overflow Feb 23 '14 at 7:46
  • 1
    ALL answers using parentheses after the word distinct are indeed wrong. Distinct is NOT a function so it cannot accept a parameter. The parentheses following distinct are simply ignored. Unless you are using PostgreSQL where the parentheses will form a "complex data type" – Used_By_Already Feb 14 '16 at 2:14

12 Answers 12

181

try this query

 SELECT ID, FirstName, LastName FROM table GROUP BY(FirstName)
  • 14
    How do we know which row will be returned? – William Entriken May 5 '13 at 16:51
  • 25
    @Full Decent you can't, according to MySQL documentation: "The server is free to choose any value from each group, so unless they are the same, the values chosen are indeterminate.". In practice I've successfully used this kind of queries with ORDER BY clause, for instance you could add ORDER BY id ASC/DESC and MySQL would return consistent results every time you would execute the query. But i would be sure whether anyone should use undocumented features in production environment. – Arunas Junevicius Jun 3 '13 at 14:54
  • 2
    O.P. doesn't mention mysql version. – diEcho Jun 11 '13 at 4:43
  • 1
    @sinaza see my updated answer for MySQL 5.7.5+ for the changed GROUP BY handling – fyrye Aug 14 '17 at 23:05
  • 1
    This doesn't work with only_full_group_by mode because neither ID nor LastName are neither aggregated nor part of the grouping function. Help! – ihodonald May 7 '19 at 1:06
57

The DISTINCT keyword doesn't really work the way you're expecting it to. When you use SELECT DISTINCT col1, col2, col3 you are in fact selecting all unique {col1, col2, col3} tuples.

  • 10
    Thanks for pointing this out Brian. Can you provide an example of how I could utilize GROUP BY to obtain the same results? – m r May 11 '11 at 16:20
54

EDIT

The original answer was written prior to MySQL 5.7.5, which no longer applies due to the default changes with ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY. It is also important to note, that when ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY is disabled, the use of GROUP BY without an aggregate function will yield unexpected results, as MySQL is free to choose ANY value within the data set being grouped [sic].

Assuming the firstname and lastname are uniquely indexed, an alternative to GROUP BY is to sort using a LEFT JOIN to filter the result set. See Demonstration

To retrieve the distinct firstname ordered by lastname in descending order (Z-A)

SELECT t1.*
FROM table_name AS t1
LEFT JOIN table_name AS t2
ON t1.firstname = t2.firstname
AND t1.lastname < t2.lastname
WHERE t2.id IS NULL;

#Results
| id | firstname | lastname |
|----|-----------|----------|
|  2 |      Bugs |    Bunny |
|  3 |      John |  Johnson |

To retrieve the distinct firstname ordered by lastname in ascending order (A-Z)

SELECT t1.*
FROM table_name AS t1
LEFT JOIN table_name AS t2
ON t1.firstname = t2.firstname
AND t1.lastname > t2.lastname
WHERE t2.id IS NULL;

#Results
| id | firstname | lastname |
|----|-----------|----------|
|  2 |      Bugs |    Bunny |
|  1 |      John |      Doe |

You can then order the resulting data as desired.

If the first and last name combination are not unique and you have multiple rows of the same values, you can filter the result set by including an OR condition on the join to choose a specific id. See the demonstration.

table_name data:

(1, 'John', 'Doe'),
(2, 'Bugs', 'Bunny'),
(3, 'John', 'Johnson'),
(4, 'John', 'Doe'),
(5, 'John', 'Johnson')
SELECT t1.*
FROM table_name AS t1
LEFT JOIN table_name AS t2
ON t1.firstname = t2.firstname
AND (t1.lastname > t2.lastname
OR (t1.firstname = t1.firstname AND t1.lastname = t2.lastname AND t1.id > t2.id))
WHERE t2.id IS NULL;

#Results
| id | firstname | lastname |
|----|-----------|----------|
|  1 |      John |      Doe |
|  2 |      Bugs |    Bunny |

WARNING

With MySQL GROUP BY will not always yield the expected results when used with ORDER BY See: Test Case Example.

The best method of implementation to ensure expected results is to filter the result set scope using a Subquery like so.

table_name data:

(1, 'John', 'Doe'),
(2, 'Bugs', 'Bunny'),
(3, 'John', 'Johnson')

Query

SELECT * FROM (
   SELECT * FROM table_name ORDER BY ID DESC
) AS t1
GROUP BY FirstName

#Results
| ID | first |    last |
|----|-------|---------|
|  2 |  Bugs |   Bunny |
|  3 |  John | Johnson |

Versus

SELECT * FROM table_name GROUP BY FirstName ORDER BY ID DESC

#Results
| ID | first |  last |
|----|-------|-------|
|  2 |  Bugs | Bunny |
|  1 |  John |   Doe |
  • 2
    Most complete answer by far. Changing 'ID desc' to 'ID asc' in the first query allow us to retrieve either 'John Doe' or 'John Johnson'. Changing 'ID desc' in second query does'nt have this effect. – carla Jun 19 '15 at 15:44
  • On postgres you need ID in group by not sure of mysql. – Sachin Prasad Aug 20 '15 at 14:04
  • Will a GROUP BY column-A ORDER BY column-B in one SELECT statement always work correctly with latest version of MyriaDB? – Neal Davis Aug 7 '18 at 22:43
  • @NealDavis As per MariaDB manual Ordering is done after grouping., so No not in this use-case, in addition MariaDB ignores ORDER BY in subqueries (as per the SQL standard) without a LIMIT. You would want to use a Window Function For more clarification you should ask your question in the DBA stackexchange, as this is a question relating to MySQL – fyrye Aug 7 '18 at 22:57
  • 1
    @NateS No, the GROUP BY can select any value within the grouped data set, unless an aggregate function is used on those columns to force a specific value. So lastname or id can come from any of the ordered rows. The original subquery example was acceptable by default in MySQL <= 5.7.4 but technically still suffers from the issue. While the ORDER BY does help to prevent a random selection, it is still theoretically possible, but with a significantly less probability than without using the ORDER BY subquery. – fyrye Dec 24 '18 at 6:59
22
SELECT ID,LastName 
From TABLE_NAME 
GROUP BY FirstName 
HAVING COUNT(*) >=1
  • 2
    adding HAVING made my query 50% slower. – Buttle Butkus Oct 21 '15 at 22:08
  • Is there any case in which HAVING COUNT(*) >= 1 will be false? – Angelos Makrygiorgos Dec 3 '16 at 17:52
  • tnx it works for me – A.nemati Jan 5 at 9:58
3
SELECT firstName, ID, LastName from tableName GROUP BY firstName
3

How about

`SELECT 
    my_distinct_column,
    max(col1),
    max(col2),
    max(col3)
    ...
 FROM
    my_table 
 GROUP BY 
    my_distinct_column`
2

Not sure if you can do this with MySQL, but you can use a CTE in T-SQL

; WITH tmpPeople AS (
 SELECT 
   DISTINCT(FirstName),
   MIN(Id)      
 FROM People
)
SELECT
 tP.Id,
 tP.FirstName,
 P.LastName
FROM tmpPeople tP
JOIN People P ON tP.Id = P.Id

Otherwise you might have to use a temporary table.

1

As pointed out by fyrye, the accepted answer pertains to older versions of MySQL in which ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY had not yet been introduced. With MySQL 8.0.17 (used in this example), unless you disable ONLY_FULL_GROUP_BY you would get the following error message:

mysql> SELECT id, firstName, lastName FROM table_name GROUP BY firstName;

ERROR 1055 (42000): Expression #1 of SELECT list is not in GROUP BY clause and contains nonaggregated column 'mydatabase.table_name.id' which is not functionally dependent on columns in GROUP BY clause; this is incompatible with sql_mode=only_full_group_by

One way to work around this not mentioned by fyrye, but described in https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/group-by-handling.html, is to apply the ANY_VALUE() function to the columns which are not in the GROUP BY clause (id and lastName in this example):

mysql> SELECT ANY_VALUE(id) as id, firstName, ANY_VALUE(lastName) as lastName FROM table_name GROUP BY firstName;
+----+-----------+----------+
| id | firstName | lastName |
+----+-----------+----------+
|  1 | John      | Doe      |
|  2 | Bugs      | Bunny    |
+----+-----------+----------+
2 rows in set (0.01 sec)

As written in the aforementioned docs,

In this case, MySQL ignores the nondeterminism of address values within each name group and accepts the query. This may be useful if you simply do not care which value of a nonaggregated column is chosen for each group. ANY_VALUE() is not an aggregate function, unlike functions such as SUM() or COUNT(). It simply acts to suppress the test for nondeterminism.

  • For clarification, I specifically avoided suggesting to use ANY_VALUE() as my answer and comments are focused on preventing ambiguous and unpredictable result-sets. Since as the function name suggests, it could result in any value from the selected rows being retrieved. I would suggest using MAX or MIN instead. – fyrye Oct 29 '19 at 17:04
0

Keep in mind when using the group by and order by that MySQL is the ONLY database that allows for columns to be used in the group by and/or order by piece that are not part of the select statement.

So for example: select column1 from table group by column2 order by column3

That will not fly in other databases like Postgres, Oracle, MSSQL, etc. You would have to do the following in those databases

select column1, column2, column3 from table group by column2 order by column3

Just some info in case you ever migrate your current code to another database or start working in another database and try to reuse code.

-2

You can use group by for display distinct values and also corresponding fields.

select * from tabel_name group by FirstName

Now you got output like this:

ID    FirstName     LastName
2     Bugs          Bunny
1     John          Doe


If you want to answer like

ID    FirstName     LastName
1     John          Doe
2     Bugs          Bunny

then use this query,

select * from table_name group by FirstName order by ID
  • 2
    This will not always yield expected results when grouping with order by – fyrye Sep 30 '14 at 15:35
-3
SELECT DISTINCT(firstName), ID, LastName from tableName GROUP BY firstName

Would be the best bet IMO

  • 31
    this won't work, it will also take the ID and lastname into the distinct evaluation. – Ludo - Off the record Jun 30 '14 at 15:05
  • 2
    this is same as DISTINCT(firstName, ID, LastName) – singleton Apr 26 '18 at 9:17
-4
SELECT DISTINCT (column1), column2
FROM table1
GROUP BY column1
  • 1
    DISTINCT() is not a function. Also DISTINCT and GROUP BY are doing the same thing, so no reason put them both. – Marki555 Jul 15 '15 at 7:37
  • This is not an efficient statement, you should use either DISTINCT or Group By not both. – heshanlk Aug 18 '17 at 3:33

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.