2

I'm storing a decimal in rails and I need to have it display as a currency as such:

11.1230 => "$11.123"
11.1000 => "$11.10"
11.0100 => "$11.01"
11.1234 => "$11.1234"

Any easy way to do this?

1
  • 1
    I think your rules might need to be clarified. Is it "at least two decimal places, but more if necessary"?
    – Phrogz
    May 11 '11 at 18:35
5
def pad_number( number, min_decimals=2 )
  s = "%g" % number
  decimals = (s[/\.(\d+)/,1] || "").length
  s << "." if decimals == 0
  s << "0"*[0,min_decimals-decimals].max
end
puts [ 11.123, 11.1, 11.01, 11.1234, 11 ].map{ |n| pad_number(n) }
#=> 11.123
#=> 11.10
#=> 11.01
#=> 11.1234
#=> 11.00
1
  • 1
    Actually the only answer to match the op's question. 11.10
    – Micka
    Apr 14 '15 at 8:28
5

Edit: Looks like this is Rails 3 specific, as Rails 2's number_with_precision method doesn't include the strip_insignificant_zeros option:

You can pass some options to number_to_currency (a standard Rails helper):

number_to_currency(11.1230, :precision => 10, :strip_insignificant_zeros => true)
# => "$11.123"

You need to provide a precision in order for the strip_insignificant_zeros option to work, though, otherwise the underlying number_with_precision method never gets called.

6
  • I actually get $11.1230000000 when I run that example
    – Jake
    May 11 '11 at 18:13
  • @dmarkow I don't see the strip_insignificant_zeros option in the documentation.
    – Phrogz
    May 11 '11 at 18:34
  • @Jake, you need to lower the :precision if you want less zeroes. Those 0's are significant digits, so they won't be tossed: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Significant_figures
    – McStretch
    May 11 '11 at 18:35
  • @Phrogz: It's not documented, but if you specify a precision, it passes ALL the options into number_with_precision (which does support the strip_insignificant_zeros option). (at least in Rails 3) May 11 '11 at 19:46
  • @Austin: I'm pretty sure he wants to display more than just two decimal places if the number warrants it. I just picked an arbitrary "high" number. May 11 '11 at 19:47
4

If you want to store as a float, you can use the number_to_currency(value) method in yours views for printing something that looks like $.

Correct me if I'm wrong (as I've rarely dealt with currency) but I think the conventional wisdom is to store dollar values as integers. That way you won't have to deal with funky float math.

2
  • 3
    Yes, store the value in cents, or whatever the smallest currency value is, as integers to avoid rounding errors. Then adjust for the desired dollar amount as a last step by dividing by 100 to return it to the normal $0.00 format. May 11 '11 at 18:18
  • I think best practice is to use decimal -- there's no rounding issues and less work for displaying. see: stackoverflow.com/questions/1019939/… Feb 5 '12 at 1:31
-1

So, convert it to three decimal fraction digits and then remove the final one if and only if it's a zero.

s.sub(/0$/, '')
1
  • This does not meet the OP's test case of 11.1234 => "11.1234"
    – Phrogz
    May 13 '11 at 15:19

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