How exactly is the right way to call IEnumerator.Reset?

The documentation says:

The Reset method is provided for COM interoperability. It does not necessarily need to be implemented; instead, the implementer can simply throw a NotSupportedException.

Okay, so does that mean I'm not supposed to ever call it?

It's so tempting to use exceptions for flow control:

using (enumerator = GetSomeExpensiveEnumerator())
{
    while (enumerator.MoveNext()) { ... }

    try { enumerator.Reset(); } //Try an inexpensive method
    catch (NotSupportedException)
    { enumerator = GetSomeExpensiveEnumerator(); } //Fine, get another one

    while (enumerator.MoveNext()) { ... }
}

Is that how we're supposed to use it? Or are we not meant to use it from managed code at all?

  • 2
    Please never ever ever use exceptions for flow control... – Enigmativity Aug 9 '15 at 0:39
up vote 44 down vote accepted

never; ultimately this was a mistake. The correct way to iterate a sequence more than once is to call .GetEnumerator() again - i.e. use foreach again. If your data is non-repeatable (or expensive to repeat), buffer it via .ToList() or similar.

It is a formal requirement in the language spec that iterator blocks throw exceptions for this method. As such, you cannot rely on it working. Ever.

  • 1
    +1 I didn't know that part was a requirement in the language spec... then yeah, that's definitely a mistake. Kind of a bummer haha, it's sometimes so much easier to call it. – Mehrdad May 11 '11 at 18:42
  • @Mark Gravell: Not all enumerators are iterator blocks. You can rely on Reset working if you are using a known IEnumerator implementation whose Reset method is known to work. For example, System.Collections.Generic.List<T>. – phoog May 11 '11 at 18:47
  • 2
    @phoog is it explicitly documented to work...? And then you limit yourself to List<T>, not the interface - which is a bit of a pain. If you already know you have list-of-T, you also know that iterating it twice is just as easy... – Marc Gravell May 11 '11 at 18:54
  • 1
    Yes, it is explicitly documented to work (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb335884.aspx). I just chose List<T> as a quick example of a library type supporting the method. – phoog May 11 '11 at 19:01
  • 1
    @springy76 reality is that "most" simply isn't enough to be useful; either it is a useful part of the contract, or it isn't. With no way of testing whether it is supported (bool ResetSupported {get;}, for example), it is useless. IIRC, the compiler specification actually requires iterator blocks to throw NotSupportedException when Reset() is called. – Marc Gravell Aug 25 '16 at 9:25

I recommend not using it. A lot of modern IEnumerable implementations will just throw an exception.

Getting enumerators is hardly ever "expensive". It is enumerating them all (fully) that can be expensive.

  • 1
    Depending on the issue, though, it can be expensive, at least relative to other normal operations. E.g.: Let's say you're wrapping calls to FindFirstFile/FindNextFile -- those acquire system handles, which is a relatively expensive operation compared to something like array enumeration. – Mehrdad May 11 '11 at 18:38
  • 1
    @MMehrdad: but then get the array once, and iterate over that. And when you need to restart, get a new iterator for the same array you already had. – jalf May 11 '11 at 18:40
  • 1
    @Mehrdad: In that case, define the enumerator so that it only calls FindFirstFile when the first item is enumerated. That way, it acts just like every other enumerator. – Stephen Cleary May 11 '11 at 18:42
  • 1
    @Mehrdad: what if that was the case? It sounds like the only solution that would satisfy your requirements is magic. It's not possible to have it both ways. You can either have the array in memory, making it cheap to iterate again and again, or you can load each element on demand, making it expensive to start over. No matter how those two options are wrapped, they're still all you have. If Reset() could be safely used, then it would still have to do one of those two – jalf May 11 '11 at 18:48
  • 1
    Either the enumerator could store the full array in memory, or it could call FindNextFile when you call Next, and FindFirstFile if you called Reset. There are no other options. – jalf May 11 '11 at 18:49
public class PeopleEnum : IEnumerator
{
    public Person[] _people;

    // Enumerators are positioned before the first element 
    // until the first MoveNext() call. 
    int position = -1;

    public PeopleEnum(Person[] list)
    {
        _people = list;
    }

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        position++;
        return (position < _people.Length);
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
        position = -1;
    }

    object IEnumerator.Current
    {
        get
        {
            return Current;
        }
    }

    public Person Current
    {
        get
        {
            try
            {
                return _people[position];
            }
            catch (IndexOutOfRangeException)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException();
            }
        }
    }
}

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