0

Here is my problem: I'm building a StringBuilder and I built a toLowerCase() method which only gives me back a single character and not the whole string.

 public MyStringBuilder1 toLowerCase() {
      String newStr = "";
      for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        if (s.charAt(i) >= 'A' && s.charAt(i) <= 'Z') {
          newStr = newStr + (char)(s.charAt(i) + 32) + "";
        }
      }
      return new MyStringBuilder1(newStr);
    }

 public static void main(String[] args) { 
      // Create a MyStringBuilder1 object 
      MyStringBuilder1 str1 = new MyStringBuilder1("Radixsort"); 
      // Display string as lowercase 
      System.out.println("\nString to lower case: " + str1.toLowerCase());
  }
  • What is your input? And what is there inside method MyStringBuilder1? – Gaurav Jeswani Jan 11 at 10:47
  • 2
    Hint: you're ignoring non-uppercase characters. Your debugger is your friend. Learn to use it. It's super-easy, and will help you find some trivial issues like this one. Learn to use it now. You'll avoid wasting days and days. – JB Nizet Jan 11 at 10:48
  • What is your construction and how do you get result? – Volkan Albayrak Jan 11 at 10:49
  • @gauravJeswani ```public static void main(String[] args) { // Create a MyStringBuilder1 object MyStringBuilder1 str1 = new MyStringBuilder1("Radixsort"); // Display string as lowercase System.out.println("\nString to lower case: " + str1.toLowerCase());´´´´ – Stay-Metal Jan 12 at 13:22
1

you can use toString() on StringBuilder in order to return String

but you aren't leveraging the StringBuilder power, when it come to long strings the concatenation of them might take great amount of resources

in order to concatenate strings, one string is copied to a new slot in the memory and then the next one

StringBuilder gives an List like behaviour, you can append char dynamically to the stringBuilder with much less effort

so instead of

newStr = newStr + (char)(s.charAt(i) + 32) + "";

you better use

stringBuilder.append((char)(s.charAt(i) + 32)) 

suggest to read the following tutorial

keep in mind, the significant performance gain will increase with the string length, but on short strings, the compiler optimization will yield much better performance

0

Oh, actually you don't need to check it using charAt. Just convert everything to lowercase. That will not affect the character that are already in lowercase, and convert the uppercase characters to lowercase. That's what you need.

You don't need to convert your character array to string object and then use String.toLowerCase method, because it internally uses Character.toLowerCase method only.

public static void lowercase( char [] letter ) {

    for (int i = 0; i < letter.length; i++) {
        letter[i] = Character.toLowerCase(letter);
    }

    System.out.println(Arrays.toString(letter));
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.