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Why the program runs endlessly?

(defn lazycombine
([s] (lazycombine s []))
([s v] (let [a (take 1 s)
             b (drop 1 s)]
            (if (= a :start)
                (lazy-seq (lazycombine b v))
                (if (= a :end)
                    (lazy-seq (cons v (lazycombine b [])))
                    (lazy-seq (lazycombine b (conj v a))))))))

(def w '(:start 1 2 3 :end :start 7 7 :end))

(lazycombine w)

I need a function that returns a lazy sequence of elements by taking elements from another sequence of the form [: start 1 2: end: start: 5: end] and combining all the elements between: start and: end into a vector

  • You have no termination condition at all, so it's hard to see how this could ever terminate. – amalloy Jan 11 at 22:49
1

You need to handle the termination condition - i.e. what should return when input s is empty?

And also the detection of :start and :end should use first instead of (take 1 s). And you can simplify that with destructuring.

(defn lazycombine
  ([s] (lazycombine s []))
  ([[a & b :as s] v]
   (if (empty? s)
     v
     (if (= a :start)
       (lazy-seq (lazycombine b v))
       (if (= a :end)
         (lazy-seq (cons v (lazycombine b [])))
         (lazy-seq (lazycombine b (conj v a))))))))


(def w '(:start 1 2 3 :end :start 7 7 :end))

(lazycombine w)
;; => ([1 2 3] [7 7])

To reduce cyclomatic complexity a bit, you can use condp to replace couple if:

(defn lazycombine
  ([s] (lazycombine s []))
  ([[a & b :as s] v]
   (if (empty? s)
     v
     (lazy-seq
      (condp = a
        :start (lazycombine b v)
        :end   (cons v (lazycombine b []))
        (lazycombine b (conj v a)))))))
0

I would do it like so, using take-while:

(ns tst.demo.core
  (:use tupelo.core tupelo.test))

(def data
  [:start 1 2 3 :end :start 7 7 :end])

(defn end-tag? [it] (= it :end))
(defn start-tag? [it] (= it :start))

(defn lazy-segments
  [data]
  (when-not (empty? data)
    (let [next-segment   (take-while #(not (end-tag? %)) data)
          data-next      (drop (inc (count next-segment)) data)
          segment-result (vec (remove #(start-tag? %) next-segment))]
      (cons segment-result
        (lazy-seq (lazy-segments data-next))))))

(dotest
  (println "result: " (lazy-segments data)))

Running we get:

result:  ([1 2 3] [7 7])

Note the contract when constructing a sequence recursively using cons (lazy or not). You must return either the next value in the sequence, or nil. Supplying nil to cons is the same as supplying an empty sequence:

 (cons 5 nil) => (5)
 (cons 5 [])  => (5)

So it is convenient to use a when form to test the termination condition (instead of using if and returning an empty vector when the sequence must end).

Suppose we wrote the cons as a simple recursion:

  (cons segment-result
    (lazy-segments data-next))

This works great and produces the same result. The only thing the lazy-seq part does is to delay when the recursive call takes place. Because lazy-seq is a Clojure built-in (special form), it it is similar to loop/recur and does not consume the stack like ordinary recursion does . Thus, we can generate millions (or more) values in the lazy sequence without creating a StackOverflowError (on my computer, the default maximum stack size is ~4000). Consider the infinite lazy-sequence of integers beginning at 0:

(defn intrange
  [n]
  (cons n (lazy-seq (intrange (inc n)))))

(dotest
  (time
    (spyx (first (drop 1e6 (intrange 0))))))

Dropping the first million integers and taking the next one succeeds and requires only a few milliseconds:

(first (drop 1000000.0 (intrange 0))) => 1000000
"Elapsed time: 49.5 msecs"

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