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I am currently trying to set up a simple function that reads in a list of integers and returns the square of each integer as follows:

(defn square-seq
  [s]
  (if (string? s)
    (s = nil)
    (map #(* % %) s)))

However i want the code to be able to handle string inputs and just default them to a numerical value to prevent a ClassCastException. Such as if i do

(square-seq ["Hello" 2 3])

Then the return value is:

(1 4 9) or (nil)

Not sure if i am overthinking it or just being dense but i can't figure how to get it to work for the life of me, Any help would be appreciated!

  • You are calling s with the arguments = nil there (s = nil) – cfrick Jan 13 at 10:43
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You are checking for a string at the top level (s) so you most likely will never hit that branch. You have to do the check where it actually triggers the error (inside the anon-fn).

So I'd write a function first, that does the "safe-square" and your square-seq can just call that.

(defn square
  [x]
  (if (string? x)
    x
    (* x x)))

(defn square-seq
  [xs]
  (map square xs))

(square-seq ["Hello" 42])
; ⇒ ("Hello" 1764)
  • Brilliant just what i was looking for, trying to get my head around functional style is taking time. Thanks for the quick response! – CajunPotassium Jan 13 at 11:01
  • 3
    I'd be tempted to replace (if (string? x) ... )) with (if-not (number? x) ... )), avoiding the exception where x is a character, vector, function, &c - as well as for strings. – Thumbnail Jan 13 at 12:31
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as an exercise, i would propose the utility function like this:

(letfn [(single-or-all [arg & args] (if (seq args)
                                      (vec (cons arg args))
                                      arg))]
  (defn mapper [f & {:keys [guard guard-failed]
                     :or {guard (constantly true)
                          guard-failed single-or-all}}]
    (fn [& items] (if (apply guard items)
                    (apply f items)
                    (apply guard-failed items)))))

the mapper factory function here produces function preguarding the input, and and resulting to a fallback function call in case of failed guard:

;; default usage:
user> (map (mapper #(* % %)) [1 2 3])
;;=> (1 4 9)

;; guard with default result:
user> (map (mapper #(* % %) :guard number?) [1 2 "aaa" 3])
;;=> (1 4 "aaa" 9)

;; guard with custom result:
user> (map (mapper #(* % %)
                   :guard number?
                   :guard-failed (constantly -1)) [1 2 "aaa" 3])
;;=> (1 4 -1 9)

;; multiple collections mapping with guards:
user> (map (mapper +
                  :guard #(every? number? %&))
           [1 2 "aaa" 3]
           [10 "zzz" 20 30])
;;=> (11 [2 "zzz"] ["aaa" 20] 33)

user> (map (mapper +
                   :guard #(every? number? %&)
                   :guard-failed (partial vector :guard/failed))
           [1 2 "aaa" 3]
           [10 "zzz" 20 30])
;;=> (11 [:guard/failed 2 "zzz"] [:guard/failed "aaa" 20] 33)

user> (map (mapper +
                   :guard #(every? number? %&)
                   :guard-failed #(apply + (filter number? %&)))
           [1 2 "aaa" 3]
           [10 "zzz" 20 30]
           [100 "x" 200 300])
;;=> (111 2 220 333)
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Seems like an occasion for a simple try/catch:

(defn square
  [x]
  (try
    (* x x)
    (catch Exception ex
      :error)))

and in usage:

(mapv square ["hello" 2 3]) => [:error 4 9]

Although I would argue that the caller should have the try/catch statement, since only the caller is able (maybe!) to do something intelligent when a non-number is present.

  • don't think it is a good occasion for try/catch. The op's question seems to be more about special handling of certain values while mapping, rather than handling the exception. Because in fact it is not an exception, but rather the business logic. Moreover (try (potentially-throwing-function x)... would be a total mess. – leetwinski Jan 13 at 16:11
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I will try to answer the "Preventing runtime error" part. The basic idea is to wrap your target function with an exception handler so runtime error can be dealt with (with yet another function). With a generic handler, you can easily apply this mechanism to whatever target function you use...

(defn square-seq
  [xs]
  ;; here safe-fn is a high order function to make * safe
  ;; by attaching an exception handler to it (which always return 1)
  (map (safe-fn * (constantly 1)) xs xs))

(square-seq ["Hello" 2 3])
;; => (1 4 9)

(defn half-seq
  [xs]
  ;; here we make / safe and also provide a different handler
  (map (safe-fn / (constantly 99)) xs (repeat 2)))

(half-seq ["Hello" 2 3])
;; => (99 1 3/2)

(defn triple-seq
  [xs]
  ;; yet another handler
  (apply map (safe-fn * (constantly 3)) (repeat 3 xs)))

(triple-seq ["Hello" 2 3])
;; => (3 8 27)

And safe-fn can be easily implemented as:

(defn safe-fn [f ex-handler]
  (fn [& args]
    (try
      (apply f args)
      (catch Throwable t
        (ex-handler t args)))))

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