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I am making a simple game in pygame and have encountered an error in an attempt to reduce code.

bulletDirectionBoolean = [bulletRight, bulletLeft, bulletDown, bulletUp]
firstTime = [firstTime1, firstTime2, firstTime3, firstTime4]
bulletDirectionX = [bulletRightX, bulletLeftX, bulletDownX, bulletUpX]
bulletDirectionY = [bulletRightY, bulletLeftY, bulletDownY, bulletUpY]
bulletDirectionMoving = [bulletRightX, bulletLeftX, bulletDownY, bulletUpY]
directionList = [1,-1,1,-1]
limits = [screenX, -20, screenY, -20]

for i in range(4):
    if bulletDirectionBoolean[i] or powerupAbility[3]:
        if firstTime[i]:
            firstTime[i] = False
            bulletDirectionX[i] = player_posX
            bulletDirectionY[i] = player_posY
        screen.blit(bullet_img, (bulletDirectionX[i], bulletDirectionY[i]))
        bulletDirectionMoving[i] += bulletSpeed*directionList[i]

        if directionList[i] == 1:
            if bulletDirectionMoving[i] > limits[i]:
                bulletDirectionBoolean = False
                firstTime[i] = True
        if directionList[i] == -1:
            if bulletDirectionMoving[i] < limits[i]:
                bulletDirectionBoolean = False
                firstTime[i] = True

This is the block of code that fails. The first line after the for loop is where it breaks. powerupAbility is another list not shown in the code that has boolean values. The same is true with the list bulletDirectionBoolean. All of the values in the list are boolean values controlled by the user. I am trying to access each value from each list at the same time for the four different bullets.

Why is it giving me this error and what can I do to fix it?

  • Are you sure it breaks on the first line after the range() loop ? not in the bullectdirectionmoving[i] += .... ? – Jim Erginbash Jan 13 at 14:26
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    The first line after the for loop is where it breaks—Do you mean the first line inside the for loop, or do you mean a line after all the code you actually posted? – khelwood Jan 13 at 14:27
  • A quick tip: using parallel lists is usually not great as it's easy for them to get out of synch. Consider making a Bullet class with the attributes direction_boolean, first_time, direction_x, direction_y, direction_moving instead. That way you can have just one list with bullet objects instead of 5 lists. – Ted Klein Bergman Jan 13 at 18:44
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Here you change bulletDirectionBoolean to a boolean:

...
    if directionList[i] == 1:
        if bulletDirectionMoving[i] > limits[i]:
            bulletDirectionBoolean = False
...

I guess you wanted to do

...
    if directionList[i] == 1:
        if bulletDirectionMoving[i] > limits[i]:
            bulletDirectionBoolean[i] = False

...

instead or something like this.

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Sloth already addressed your current issue. I'd just want to add that "parallel lists" are an antipattern, and even more if they're not strictly local - if any otyher part of the code touches one of the lists in an unexpected way (sort it, reverse it, push to it ot pop from it etc), all bets are off.

A better design is one list of either tuples, dicts or dataclasses, ie:

# brittle
foos = ["a", "b", "c"]
bars = [1, 2, 3]

for i in range(3):
    print("{} : {}" .format(foos[i], bars[i]))

# more robust    
foobars = [("a", 1), ("b", 2), ("c", 3)]
for foo, bar in foobars:
    print("{} : {}".format(foo, bar))


# more robust and more explicit:
foobars = [{"foo": "a", "bar": 1}, {"foo":"b", "bar": 2}, ("foo": "c", "bar:3}]

for foobar in foobars:
    print("{} : {}".format(foobar["foo"], foobar["bar"]))

Also, if your "lists" are supposed to be of fixed sizes (everything seem to be of length 4 in your example), you may want to define your own dedicated container class instead, that will enforce the collection's size (and possibly other invariants).

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