41

This is my first try with cmake and I would like to have, if possible, some feedbacks about what I did since some problems remain.

In the CMakeLists.txt of the library folder, I created two makefile targets: configure-antlr3c and antlr3c. The first target runs the autotools configuration shell script, the second one runs the make executable to build the library:

# CMakeLists.txt in libantlr3c-3.1.3 
add_custom_target(
  configure-antlr3c
  ${SHELL_EXECUTABLE} configure
  WORKING_DIRECTORY ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}
)

add_custom_target(
  antlr3c
   ${MAKE}
   DEPENDS configure-antlr3c
   WORKING_DIRECTORY ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}
)

The main problem is thatconfigure-antlr3c target is always "out of date", so it will always be executed even if no changes happened. Moreover, I necessarily need to generate my cmake makefiles in a separate directory (not in the root directory of my project) to avoid overriding the autotools Makefile of the library...

Has anyone had this problem (building autotools projects with cmake) ? And if so, what have been your solutions ?

Thank you.

EDIT : Solution In the root CMakeLists.txt:

include(ExternalProject)
ExternalProject_Add(
  libantlr3c
  SOURCE_DIR ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/lib/libantlr3c-3.1.3
  CONFIGURE_COMMAND ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/lib/libantlr3c-3.1.3/configure --prefix=${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/lib/libantlr3c-3.1.3
  PREFIX ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/lib/libantlr3c-3.1.3
  BUILD_COMMAND make
  BUILD_IN_SOURCE 1
)
1
  • 4
    You should add your solution to an Answer block; not in the question.
    – jww
    Oct 27, 2017 at 17:46

2 Answers 2

54

I think that you'd be better off using the ExternalProject feature of cmake. I guess you have your project and have libantrl in a sub directory?

project
      +- libantlr
      +- mysrc
  ---- etc ----

If that's the case, you can do something like this in the top level CMakeLists.txt:

cmake_minimum_required(VERSION 2.8)
project(test)
include(ExternalProject)
ExternalProject_Add(libantlr
    SOURCE_DIR ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/libantlr
    CONFIGURE_COMMAND ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/libantlr/configure --prefix=<INSTALL_DIR>
    BUILD_COMMAND ${MAKE})

The <INSTALL_DIR> is expanded to something like libantlr-prefix, so things are installed in your build tree rather than in /usr/local, which is what autotools would do without a prefix.

3
  • Perfect ! And this keep track of the fact I just compiled it and I don't need to build it every time I have a dependency. Thanks a lot ;) May 12, 2011 at 11:00
  • 2
    Nice answer. Just take into account that "configure" needs an absolute path for "--prefix". Nov 19, 2013 at 15:40
  • It looks like wrong compiler is used when building's an external project. At least in the mbed tool chain.
    – majkrzak
    Apr 11 at 19:12
11

I needed to do something similar but found it surprisingly difficult to get a working solution, despite the example provided here with the accepted answer, and code snippets provided in several other blog posts, the CMake support email listserv archives, etc. For the benefit of others who come across this question, here is my solution.

The external project we wanted to use is libmodbus, though I believe my solution is general enough to work with any project configured with the standard autoconf recipe of ./autoconf.sh && configure.sh && make && make install.

We wanted to add libmodbus as a submodule of our git repository. We added to our repository at the path <root>/opt/libmodbus. The CMake code to configure it is located in <root>/cmake/modbus.cmake, which is included from our root CMakeLists.txt using

# libmodbus
include(cmake/modbus.cmake)

The content of cmake/modbus.cmake is:

include(ExternalProject)

set(MODBUS_DIR ${CMAKE_CURRENT_SOURCE_DIR}/opt/libmodbus)
set(MODBUS_BIN ${CMAKE_CURRENT_BINARY_DIR}/libmodbus)
set(MODBUS_STATIC_LIB ${MODBUS_BIN}/lib/libmodbus.a)
set(MODBUS_INCLUDES ${MODBUS_BIN}/include)

file(MAKE_DIRECTORY ${MODBUS_INCLUDES})

ExternalProject_Add(
    libmodbus
    PREFIX ${MODBUS_BIN}
    SOURCE_DIR ${MODBUS_DIR}
    DOWNLOAD_COMMAND cd ${MODBUS_DIR} && git clean -dfX && ${MODBUS_DIR}/autogen.sh
    CONFIGURE_COMMAND ${MODBUS_DIR}/configure --srcdir=${MODBUS_DIR} --prefix=${MODBUS_BIN} --enable-static=yes --disable-shared
    BUILD_COMMAND make
    INSTALL_COMMAND make install
    BUILD_BYPRODUCTS ${MODBUS_STATIC_LIB}
)

add_library(modbus STATIC IMPORTED GLOBAL)

add_dependencies(modbus libmodbus)

set_target_properties(modbus PROPERTIES IMPORTED_LOCATION ${MODBUS_STATIC_LIB})
set_target_properties(modbus PROPERTIES INTERFACE_INCLUDE_DIRECTORIES ${MODBUS_INCLUDES})

A component that uses libmodbus can declare its dependency as usual:

    add_executable(hello_modbus main.cpp)
    target_link_libraries(hello_modbus modbus)

A few notes:

  1. This abuses the DOWNLOAD_COMMAND to perform the autogen.sh step. The git clean -dfX is probably not necessary (it is a leftover from an earlier version that used the BUILD_IN_SOURCE option. If you really want to download the code instead of using a git submodule, you'll need to modify this line appropriately.
  2. We go to the trouble to force a static-only build of the library. Adjust your configure command line if you want shared libraries.
  3. The set_target_properties command to set the IMPORTED_LOCATION will fail without the BUILD_BYPRODUCTS ${MODBUS_STATIC_LIB} declaration.
  4. Likewise, the set_target_properties command to set the INTERFACE_INCLUDE_DIRECTORIES will fail without the file(MAKE_DIRECTORY ${MODBUS_INCLUDES}).
1
  • 1
    I accidentally wrapped the line after CONFIGURE_COMMAND in quotes, and it didn't work. Took some time to figure that out. Sep 19, 2020 at 13:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.