13

I have two pandas data frames, a and b:

a1   a2   a3   a4   a5   a6   a7
1    3    4    5    3    4    5
0    2    0    3    0    2    1
2    5    6    5    2    1    2

and

b1   b2   b3   b4   b5   b6   b7
3    5    4    5    1    4    3
0    1    2    3    0    0    2
2    2    1    5    2    6    5

The two data frames contain exactly the same data, but in a different order and with different column names. Based on the numbers in the two data frames, I would like to be able to match each column name in a to each column name in b.

It is not as easy as simply comparing the first row of a with the first row of b as there are duplicated values, for example both a4 and a7 have the value 5 so it is not possible to immediately match them to either b2 or b4.

What is the best way to do this?

14

Here is a way using sort_values:

m=df1.T.sort_values(by=[*df1.index]).index
n=df2.T.sort_values(by=[*df2.index]).index
d=dict(zip(m,n))
print(d)

{'a1': 'b5', 'a5': 'b1', 'a2': 'b7', 'a3': 'b6', 'a6': 'b3', 'a7': 'b2', 'a4': 'b4'}
  • Thank you for sharing nice command Anky, could you please explain more on [*df1.index] part please? Will be grateful to you, cheers. – RavinderSingh13 Jan 14 at 9:29
  • 1
    @RavinderSingh13 Sure, sort_values(by=..) takes a list as a parameter so I am unpacking the index to a list here , you could also do list(df1.index) instead of [*df1.index] :) – anky_91 Jan 14 at 9:36
13

Here's one way leveraging numpy broadcasting:

b_cols = b.columns[(a.values == b.T.values[...,None]).all(1).argmax(1)]
dict(zip(a, b_cols))

{'a1': 'b5',
 'a2': 'b7',
 'a3': 'b6',
 'a4': 'b4',
 'a5': 'b1',
 'a6': 'b3',
 'a7': 'b2'}

Another similar approach (by @piR):

a_ = a.to_numpy()
b_ = b.to_numpy()
i, j = np.where((a_[:, None, :] == b_[:, :, None]).all(axis=0))
dict(zip(a.columns[j], b.columns[i]))

{'a1': 'b5',
 'a2': 'b7',
 'a3': 'b6',
 'a4': 'b4',
 'a5': 'b1',
 'a6': 'b3',
 'a7': 'b2'}
  • 1
    I stuck my nose in your post. Hopefully, you don't mind. Please change it to your liking. – piRSquared Jan 13 at 18:13
  • Ah on the contrary :) Nice approach, and checking on large dataframes it slightly improves performance @piRSquared – yatu Jan 13 at 20:36
10

One way of merge

s=df1.T.reset_index().merge(df2.T.assign(match=lambda x : x.index))
dict(zip(s['index'],s['match']))
{'a1': 'b5', 'a2': 'b7', 'a3': 'b6', 'a4': 'b4', 'a5': 'b1', 'a6': 'b3', 'a7': 'b2'}
  • I thought I'd add another clever solution only to see that it was the same as yours (-: whoops. – piRSquared Jan 13 at 17:57
6

dictionary comprehensions

Use a tuple of the column values as the hashable key in a dictionary

d = {(*t,): c for c, t in df2.items()}
{c: d[(*t,)] for c, t in df1.items()}

{'a1': 'b5',
 'a2': 'b7',
 'a3': 'b6',
 'a4': 'b4',
 'a5': 'b1',
 'a6': 'b3',
 'a7': 'b2'}

Just in case we don't have perfect representation, I've only produced the dictionary for columns where there is a match.

d2 = {(*t,): c for c, t in df2.items()}
d1 = {(*t,): c for c, t in df1.items()}

{d1[c]: d2[c] for c in {*d1} & {*d2}}

{'a5': 'b1',
 'a2': 'b7',
 'a7': 'b2',
 'a6': 'b3',
 'a3': 'b6',
 'a1': 'b5',
 'a4': 'b4'}

idxmax

This borders on the absurd... Don't actually do this.

{c: df2.T.eq(df1[c]).sum(1).idxmax() for c in df1}

{'a1': 'b5',
 'a2': 'b7',
 'a3': 'b6',
 'a4': 'b4',
 'a5': 'b1',
 'a6': 'b3',
 'a7': 'b2'}
  • 1
    How is it that, I can understand each expression in these statements, yet not fully see in my head what is really going here? Kinda like chess, I know how to move all the piece on the board, but can't see more that 2 move ahead. – Scott Boston Jan 13 at 18:02
  • Okay... I have digested this now and it is absolutely simply yet, brilliant. +1 – Scott Boston Jan 13 at 18:11

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