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I read a csv file into a 2d list:

aData = loadtxt(sPath, delimiter=',')

that i could directly split into two 2d list:

X = aData[:,10:]    # neural net output
Y = aData[:,2:10]   # neural net input

But before that i want to spread aData onto 6 different 2d-lists

aDataW = [  [[]], [[]], [[]], [[]], [[]], [[]]  ]  # no idea if this is correct :-(

and then something like

for i in range(len(aData)):
    iW = 4  # my logic..
    aDataW[iW].append(aData[i])

But when then I get the error

aDataN = aDataW[4]
X = aDataM[:,10:]
TypeError: list indices must be integers, not tuple
  • Python lists don't have dimensions. aData is a list, presumably, you'd hoped to manipulate it like a numpy.ndarray what is loadtxt? – juanpa.arrivillaga Jan 13 at 22:24
  • According to the error, aDataM is a list. aDataM[:,10:] is valid style of indexing for an array, as when you split aData. Do you understand that Python list is different from numpy.ndarray? – hpaulj Jan 14 at 3:11
  • There isn't such a thing as 2d list. A list may contain lists, but each has to be indexed separately. – hpaulj Jan 14 at 3:43
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I needed to convert the list of lists back to a 2d array with np.asarray() Working example:

import numpy as np

hFile = open("test.csv", "w")
hFile.write('1,1,3,4\n1,0,1,2\n0,1,1,7')
hFile.close()

aData = np.loadtxt('test.csv', delimiter=',')
print '\naData:'
print aData

aaData = [  [], [], []  ]    # 'split' aData onto 3 2d-arrays
print '\naaData:'
print aaData

for i in range(len(aData)):
    aPred = aData[i,0:2]
    iW = int(aPred[0]+aPred[0])
    aaData[iW].append(aData[i])

for i in range(len(aaData)):
    aaData[i] = np.asarray(aaData[i])

print '\naaData[2]:'
print aaData[2]

X = aaData[2][:,2:]     # neural net input
Y = aaData[2][:,0:2]    # neural net output

print '\nX:'
print X

output:

aData:
[[1. 1. 3. 4.]
 [1. 0. 1. 2.]
 [0. 1. 1. 7.]]

aaData:
[[], [], []]

aaData[2]:
[[1. 1. 3. 4.]
 [1. 0. 1. 2.]]

X:
[[3. 4.]
 [1. 2.]]

Silly Python : 'Fancy operators for complex data are proof that you have not understood OOP at all and still live in the 20th century.' (Robo Durden)

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