1

Let's say I have object A which may contain object B which may contain object C which may contain object D. If I want to check if D exists (so it would look something like this):

A: {
    B: {
        C: {
             D: 1.5
        }
    }
}
// As oppose to
A: {
}

I know doing 'D' in A.B.C won't work because A.B might not exist let alone A.B.C, so is there any way to check if D exists that is cleaner/better practice than this:

('B' in A) && ('C' in A.B) && ('D' in A.B.C)

I know this probably seems like a stupid question, but this is something I've been wondering for a while, so thanks in advance for any answers!

  • Is A a variable or a property in another object? If it's a variable it should start A =, not A: – Barmar Jan 14 at 4:20
  • for Nested objects refer this is you'll get it the answer hackernoon.com/… – Kishore Jan 14 at 4:31
2

You can use typeof to check the type of it first:

if (typeof A.B === 'object' && typeof A.B.C === 'object') {
    var d = A.B.C.D;
}

In your case, you can write it shorter using truthy/falsy:

if (A.B && A.B.C) {
    // 1.5
    var d = A.B.C.D;
}

// or
var d = A.B && A.B.C ? A.B.C.D : undefined;

// or (based on @Barmar's comment)
var d = A.B && A.B.C && A.B.C.D;
  • 1
    The last can be simplified to just var d = A.B && A.B.C && A.B.C.D; – Barmar Jan 14 at 4:21
  • And then you get into all of the different use-cases like wanting to preserve true/false values in A.B.C.D var d = (A.B && A.B.C && A.B.C.D) || undefined – BlueWater86 Jan 14 at 4:25
1

let obj={A:{B:{C:{D:1.5}}}}

function findPropValInObj(prop, obj){
    if(typeof obj !== "object"){
        return null
    }
    for(let [key,val] of Object.entries(obj)){
        if(key === prop){
            return obj[key]
        }else if(typeof obj === "object" && obj !== null){
            return findPropValInObj(prop, val)
        }
    }
}

console.log(findPropValInObj("D", obj))

0

Here's a simple solution using a utility function to handle the errors using try catch blocks.

// create a failsafe callback envoker
function failSafe(call) {
  try {
    return call();
  } catch (e) {
    return undefined;
  }
}
// given objects
const obj1 = { A: { B: { C: { D: 1.5 } } } };
const obj2 = { A: {} };
// getting values
const val1 = failSafe(() => obj1.A.B.C.D); // 1.5
const val2 = failSafe(() => obj1.A.B.C); // { D: 1.5 }
const val2 = failSafe(() => obj2.A.B.C.D); // undefined

Now checking the value of values in this way and if it has something set in it, it will tell that the targeted property exists or not. If it returns undefined, then the value you're trying to access simply doesn't exist.

0

You can use lodash library

_.has(obj, 'A.B.C.D');

https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.15#has

Edit:

To get the value you can call get method with default value

_.get(object, 'A.B.C.D', null);

https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.15#get

0

You can create a common function which will check and return the value or the default value like this:

function getValue(object, path, defaultValue = null) {
    let pathArr = path.split(".");
    let temp = object;
    let value = defaultValue;
    pathArr.every(function(key) {
      if (
        temp[key] &&
        typeof temp[key] === "object" &&
        temp[key] !== null
      ) {
        value = temp[key];
        temp = temp[key];
        return true;
      } else if (
        temp[key] &&
        typeof temp[key] !== "object" &&
        temp[key] !== null
      ) {
        value = temp[key];
        return true;
      } else {
        value = defaultValue;
        return false;
      }
    });
    return value;
  }

  // use like this

  let y = { a: { b: { c: { d: "value" } } } };
  let z = { a: { b: { c: { d: "value" } } } };
  console.log(getValue(y, "a.b.c.d", "default value")); // value
  console.log(getValue(z, "a.b.c.d.e")); // null

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