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I have a recommendation dataset that I have transformed into a matrix of the form:

           item1       item2     item3 ...
user1       NaN         2.3       NaN
user2       1.7         3.4       NaN
user3       NaN         1.1       2.6
...

where NaN are items that the particular user has not reviewed yet. The above is in the form of a pandas dataframe. I want to construct an adjacency matrix from this, based on a predefined distance metric. I have a working function:

def compute_adjacency_matrix(reccomender_matrix):
    # replace nan with 0
    rec_num = reccomender_matrix.fillna(value=0)

    # compute the distances between every two users
    result = np.array([[compute_distance(li[2:], lj[2:]) for lj in rec_num.itertuples()] for li in rec_num.itertuples()])
    adjacency_matrix = (result > 0.0).astype(int)

    return adjacency_matrix

the problem is that, for large matrices, the line that computes result takes very long. What is the most efficient way of doing this, that would scale for larger datasets?

EDIT: Here is the compute distance function:

def compute_distance(vec1, vec2):
    rez =  sum(abs(v1[(v1>0)&(v2>0)] - v2[(v1>0)&(v2>0)]))
    norm = np.count_nonzero(v1) if np.count_nonzero(v1) < np.count_nonzero(v2) else np.count_nonzero(v2)
    norm_rez = rez / norm
    return norm_rez
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    What does compute_distance do? If you can use native numpy broadcasting it will be much faster than looping with itertuples. Can you give a sample code for compute_distance? – yohai Jan 14 at 9:28
  • I added the function above. It takes the distance between two vectors just by their non-zero elements on common positions. – Qubix Jan 14 at 10:41
  • Regardless of the implementation, I think you need to rethink your metrics and outputs. That code will make anyone who's recommended the same item adjacent, no matter what score they gave - unless the gave the same scores, then they won't be adjacent. Not sure that's what you want. – Daniel F Jan 14 at 10:51
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So it looks like you want a mean absolute distance metric, although that's not exactly what you wrote (since you're normalizing not by the size of the intersection but the size of the smaller vector). If you want mean absolute distance, it's simply:

def compute_distance(vec1, vec2):
    return np.nanmean(np.abs(vec1 - vec2))

You can then use that metric with scipy.spatial.distance.pdist and squareform

from scipy.spatial.distance import pdist, squareform
def compute_adjacency_matrix(reccomender_matrix):
    result = squareform(pdist(reccomender_matrix.values.T, metric = compute_distance))
    result = np.nan_to_num(result)
    adjacency_matrix = (result > 0.0).astype(int)

    return adjacency_matrix

As noted in my comment, I think you need to rethink your metrics and outputs. That code will make anyone who's recommended the same item adjacent, no matter what score they gave - unless the gave the same scores, then they won't be adjacent. Not sure that's what you want.

A slightly better method would be carrying through the nans and using them to make your adjacency matrix.

def compute_adjacency_matrix(reccomender_matrix):
    result = squareform(pdist(reccomender_matrix.values.T, metric = compute_distance))
    adjacency_matrix = np.logical_not(np.isnan(result)).astype(int)
    return adjacency_matrix

If you don't need the distances, you can do it all with binary operations:

def adjacency(x, y):
    return np.any(np.logical_and(x, y))

def compute_adjacency_matrix(reccomender_matrix):
        return squareform(pdist(np.isfinite(reccomender_matrix.values.T), 
                                metric = adjacency)).astype(int)

Finally, you can do it all with numba if that's all too slow:

import numba as nb

@nb.njit
def compute_adjacency_matrix(reccomender_matrix):
    n, m = reccomender_matrix.shape
    out = np.zeros((m, m))
    count = np.zeros((m, m))
    dists = np.zeros((m, m))
    adj = np.zeros((m, m))
    for i in range(1, m):
        for j in range(i + 1, m):
            for k in range(n):
                if not(np.isnan(reccomender_matrix[k, i]) or \
                       np.isnan(reccomender_matrix[k, j])):
                    out[i, j]   += np.abs(reccomender_matrix[k, i] - reccomender_matrix[k, j])
                    count[i, j] += 1
    for i in range(m):
        for j in range(m):
            if i == j:
                dists[i, j] = 0.
            elif i < j:
                if count[i, j] != 0:
                    dists[i, j] = out[i, j] / count [i, j]
                    adj[i, j] = 1
                else:
                    dists[i, j] = 0.
            else:
                dists[i, j] = dists[j, i]
                adj[i, j] = adj[j, i]
    return dists, adj
  • One question: since this code is very slow, do you have any idea how this may be parallelized? I am looking at this: machinelearningplus.com/python/parallel-processing-python/… but no clue how to modify the above to fit it. – Qubix Jan 14 at 11:59
  • Do you want to use the result of compute_distance for anything else? Because otherwise you can just do binary operations which will be much faster. – Daniel F Jan 14 at 12:04
  • No, just for my dataset, but it's slow, and I realized it's only using a single thread, though I have 16 available. I was wondering if I can make it use all available threads. Also, now that it finished running, the above code (last function) returns False and True, not the distances. That is not the desired result. – Qubix Jan 14 at 12:06
  • Yeah, I forgot .astype(int), sorry. Check out the seed on the binary version I added – Daniel F Jan 14 at 12:10
  • Ok, but the last two functions are for the case where I don't care about the distances (edge weights). I will use the first definition of compute_adjacency, as for me the edge weights (distances) are essential. – Qubix Jan 14 at 12:11

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