21

I have a local domain (markfisher.local) for which I have made a self-signed certificate that I have added to the Certificates in Keychain Access (I am using Mac). This results in the certificate being trusted in Chrome and Safari. If I edit the certificates Trust in KeyChain Access to "Never Trust" then Chrome and Safari no longer accept it, then if I change it back to "Always Trust" then I can access markfisher.local OK again.

But when accessing the site in Firefox I get the following:

markfisher.local uses an invalid security certificate.
The certificate does not come from a trusted source.
Error code: MOZILLA_PKIX_ERROR_CA_CERT_USED_AS_END_ENTITY

I have set security.enterprise_roots.enabled to true as suggested in this answer. Also, going to Preferences > Privacy & Security > View Certificates, I can see my certificate is in the Authorities tab and I have checked the "This certificate can identify websites" in the "Edit Trust" dialog. This was not checked originally

However Firefox refuses to accept the certificate. How can I fix this?

3 Answers 3

17

This answer is expanding on Patrick Mevzek's answer. To quote:

See https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1034124 and specifically this answer:

Looks like that certificate has a basicConstraints extension with the value cA: TRUE. We stopped allowing CA certificates to act as end-entity certificates. That certificate should be regenerated without the basicConstraints extension.

This is also explained at https://wiki.mozilla.org/SecurityEngineering/x509Certs

Error Code: MOZILLA_PKIX_ERROR_CA_CERT_USED_AS_END_ENTITY

What It Means: A certificate with a basic constraints extension with cA:TRUE is being used as an end-entity certificate

What Can I Do: Re-generate the end-entity certificate without the basic constraints extension


In short, to use self-signed SSL certificates to work in Firefox (e.g., for testing HTTPS), you'll have to go the long route of creating and using your own public key infrastructure (PKI):

Step 1. Establish your private certificate authority (CA)

By creating a private key and self-signed certificate:

openssl req -x509 -nodes \
  -newkey RSA:2048       \
  -keyout root-ca.key    \
  -days 365              \
  -out root-ca.crt       \
  -subj '/C=US/ST=Denial/L=Earth/O=Atest/CN=root_CA_for_firefox'

Generated files:

Step 2. Create a private key and a certificate signing request (CSR) for your server

openssl req -nodes   \
  -newkey rsa:2048   \
  -keyout server.key \
  -out server.csr    \
  -subj '/C=US/ST=Denial/L=Earth/O=Dis/CN=anything_but_whitespace'

Generated files:

  • server.key: Private key
  • server.csr: Certificate signing request; does not any domain names to be specified.

Step 3. Generate a certificate for your server

NOTE
Make sure to use the right domain name at the subjectAltName = DNS:<domain> part below!

openssl x509 -req    \
  -CA root-ca.crt    \
  -CAkey root-ca.key \
  -in server.csr     \
  -out server.crt    \
  -days 365          \
  -CAcreateserial    \
  -extfile <(printf "subjectAltName = DNS:localhost\nauthorityKeyIdentifier = keyid,issuer\nbasicConstraints = CA:FALSE\nkeyUsage = digitalSignature, keyEncipherment\nextendedKeyUsage=serverAuth")

The <(..) part is called process substitution in Bash. If you use another shell without this feature, then simply put the text inside the double quotes in a file, replace "\n" with newlines, and specify the file instead for -extfile.

Generated files:

  • root-ca.srl: I usually ignore it
  • server.crt: Certificate to be used on your server

Step 4. Add root-ca.crt to Firefox's trust store

By following these steps.

NOTE
As @sstchur pointed out in the comments, this step may not be necessary if the options

  • security.certerrors.mitm.auto_enable_enterprise_roots and
  • security.enterprise_roots.enabled

are set to true. (See the Mozilla support article How to disable the Enterprise Roots preference for details.)
(subnote: I didn't have the time to test these yet in practice!)

Step 5. Configure your server

You'll need server.key and server.crt. The specific steps depend on the technology.


Why are these steps needed for Firefox?

While the following one-liner below works both in Chrome and Safari,

(That is, where one would use the created cert both as a root CA cert (to install in a system's trust store) and a cert for a web server (e.g., in NGINX with ssl_certificate).)

openssl req -x509 -new -nodes                                            \
  -newkey RSA:2048                                                       \
  -days 365                                                              \
  -subj '/C=US/ST=Denial/L=Springfield/O=Dis/CN=anything_but_whitespace' \
  -addext 'subjectAltName = DNS:doma.in,DNS:anoth.er'                    \
  -addext 'authorityKeyIdentifier = keyid,issuer'                        \
  -addext 'basicConstraints = CA:FALSE'                                  \
  -addext 'keyUsage = digitalSignature, keyEncipherment'                 \
  -addext 'extendedKeyUsage=serverAuth'                                  \
  -out self-signed.crt                                                   \
  -keyout private.key

it won't in Firefox, because:

  1. You can't install self-signed.crt in Firefox's trust store, because it explicitly states that the certificate is not a certificate authority (CA:FALSE).

  2. What if you change CA:FALSE to CA:TRUE in the command above?

    Chrome and Safari will still accept it, you can install self-signed.crt into Firefox's trust store, but it won't work from the server's side because of the quoted reasons at the top of this answer.

  3. What if you simply delete the -addext 'basicConstraints = CA:FALSE option?

    Firefox will complain when trying to import self-signed.crt in its trust store:

    Alert: This is not a certificate authority certificate, so it can’t be imported into the certificate authority list.

    (Probably because of the x509 v3 extensions added with -addext.)

  4. What if you omit all the x509 v3 extensions (i.e., -addext options)?

    openssl req -x509 -new -nodes                                            \
      -newkey RSA:2048                                                       \
      -days 365                                                              \
      -subj '/C=US/ST=Denial/L=Springfield/O=Dis/CN=anything_but_whitespace' \
      -out self-signed.crt                                                   \
      -keyout private.key
    

    Now you can import self-signed.crt into Firefox's trust store, but you will get SSL_ERROR_BAD_CERT_DOMAIN (and you'll get a similar error in Chrome and Safari as they need the subjectAltName extension to be present on the certificate from the server's side).

  5. What about changing the command to contain CN=<your domain>?

    You'll probably still get the same error as "Firefox from 101.0 onward no longer uses certificate CN (Common Name) for matching domain name to certificate and have migrated to only using SAN (Subject Alternate Name)".

    Which means you have to add at least the subjectAltName x509 v3 extension, but then you are back at items 1, 2, or 3 above.

7
  • Why is Step 5: Configure your server needed? Firefox has a setting, security.certerrors.mitm.auto_enable_enterprise_roots, which is default set to true. I thought that setting caused Firefox to automatically import OS-level enterprise roots? So if I install the cert into the Windows Trust Root Certification Authorities store, why doesn't Firefox auto enable it, like the setting suggests it would?
    – sstchur
    Commented Nov 2, 2023 at 20:17
  • Sorry, I don't understand your question because I'm not familiar with any of those settings. I put this answer together because I had the same issue as the OP when serving a web app on my local machine and trying to enable HTTPS for Firefox. So, for me, step 5. was to configure the cert bundle and the server's private key for NGINX that would be serving the site itself. What was your specific issue that led you to this thread?
    – toraritte
    Commented Nov 3, 2023 at 1:30
  • 1
    Yes, I had the same issue as the OP with Firefox not trusting the self-signed cert. I followed your instructions to establish a CA, create a CSR and then generate a new cert signed by the CA. And that works if you manually import it into Firefox's cert store. Apparently FF has its own cert store apart from the Windows cert store. But Firefox has a setting: security.certerrors.mitm.auto_enable_enterprise_roots, which I understood was supposed to automatically import trusted root certs into the FF store. I was hoping that would alleviate the need for me to manually import the cert to FF
    – sstchur
    Commented Nov 3, 2023 at 19:04
  • 2
    Just wanted to pass on a huge thank you! I spent hours trying to get this working on my own then found your answer and it was exactly what I needed
    – amura.cxg
    Commented Feb 26 at 3:24
  • 1
    @amura.cxg Happy to hear it's useful and thanks for making my day!
    – toraritte
    Commented Feb 26 at 13:11
9

See https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=1034124 and specifically this answer:

Looks like that certificate has a basicConstraints extension with the value cA: TRUE. We stopped allowing CA certificates to act as end-entity certificates. That certificate should be regenerated without the basicConstraints extension.

This is also explained at https://wiki.mozilla.org/SecurityEngineering/x509Certs

Error Code: MOZILLA_PKIX_ERROR_CA_CERT_USED_AS_END_ENTITY

What It Means: A certificate with a basic constraints extension with cA:TRUE is being used as an end-entity certificate

What Can I Do: Re-generate the end-entity certificate without the basic constraints extension

5
  • I tried that, and now I get SEC_ERROR_BAD_SIGNATURE in Firefox. Chrome and Safari are still fine. Commented Jan 14, 2020 at 21:37
  • SEC_ERROR_BAD_SIGNATURE should really mean the certificate is malformed. Except trying to generate some more, differently, I have no idea. Make sure to generate "v3" certificates, not v1 ones. Alternatively, post the certificate content in your question so anyone could see it. Commented Jan 14, 2020 at 21:40
  • I think I altered the basicConstraints config setting in the wrong section first time around. I fixed the MOZILLA_PKIX_ERROR_CA_CERT_USED_AS_END_ENTITY with your answer. Thanks! Commented Jan 14, 2020 at 23:44
  • 1
    Using devcert you can generate a self-signed cert and it will work with Firefox.
    – cgatian
    Commented Nov 10, 2021 at 14:07
  • But then the certificate can't be installed on Android - only CA certificates can be installed
    – olfek
    Commented Jun 9, 2023 at 21:22
0

I fixed the error by running "Run AutoSSL" on my hosting cPanel after DNS propagation.

Now Firefox says that the connection is secure, without any error.

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