1

I'm having trouble reading back a value that I've serialized to hex format. The following code produces a value of 0x14 when I format an integer. However, when I try to read that value back from the string, I get invalid results. Can someone help me figure out what I'm doing wrong?

I have pre-existing text files that I'm parsing with multiple lines that include this format, so serializing into a different format will not be a viable solution. I need work with this specific format.

According to the go docs, this should work: https://golang.org/pkg/fmt/

The verbs behave analogously to those of Printf. For example, %x will scan an integer as a hexadecimal number, and %v will scan the default representation format for the value. The Printf verbs %p and %T and the flags # and + are not implemented. For floating-point and complex values, all valid formatting verbs (%b %e %E %f %F %g %G %x %X and %v) are equivalent and accept both decimal and hexadecimal notation (for example: "2.3e+7", "0x4.5p-8") and digit-separating underscores (for example: "3.14159_26535_89793").

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    encode := 20
    fmt.Println(fmt.Sprintf("%#x", encode)) // 0x14

    var decode int
    numRead, err := fmt.Sscanf("0x14", "%#x", &decode)
    fmt.Println(decode, numRead, err) // 0 1 bad verb '%#' for integer

    numRead, err = fmt.Sscanf("0x14", "%x", &decode)
    fmt.Println(decode, numRead, err) // 0 1 nil
}
5

The %x verb will scan a hexadecimal integer but not the 0x prefix. You may add that prefix to the format string:

var decode int
numRead, err := fmt.Sscanf("0x14", "0x%x", &decode)
fmt.Println(decode, numRead, err) 

This will properly scan the 0x14 input into the decimal integer value of 20 (try it on the Go Playground):

20 1 <nil>

Another option is to use the %v verb which handles the prefix and detects that it is a hexadecimal number:

var decode int
numRead, err := fmt.Sscanf("0x14", "%v", &decode)
fmt.Println(decode, numRead, err) // Outputs: 20 <nil>

This outputs the same. Try this one on the Go Playground. This has the flexibility that the input may be specified in a number of bases, the base will be detected from the prefix ("%v will scan the default representation format for the value"), such as 0x for hexa, 0 for octal, 0b for binary.

You may also use strconv.ParseInt() where you can specify a base == 0, in which case "the base is implied by the string's prefix: base 2 for "0b", base 8 for "0" or "0o", base 16 for "0x", and base 10 otherwise".

decode, err := strconv.ParseInt("0x14", 0, 64)
fmt.Println(decode, err)

Try this one on the Go Playground.

  • Thanks! I appreciate the extra effort you put in to provide alternatives and I learned some new tricks :) – Joel Jan 14 at 20:26
5

Note this sentence in the docs:

The Printf verbs %p and %T and the flags # and + are not implemented.

So:

var decode int
numRead, err := fmt.Sscanf("0x14", "0x%x", &decode)
fmt.Println(decode, numRead, err) 

numRead, err = fmt.Sscanf("14", "%x", &decode)
fmt.Println(decode, numRead, err) 
  • Ah, I did read that but for some reason it didn't register that I needed to add the 0x prefix myself in the format string since I couldn't use equivalent formats. Thanks for the dummy check! – Joel Jan 14 at 20:26

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