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Is the value of this pointer guaranteed to be constant during a lifetime of a particular object? I can't imagine a case where it would change, but don't know whether I am not missing something.

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    The value of this pointer always is the value of the address of the object on which the function was called on. So the question is equivalent with 'can an object change its memory address over life time?' – Aconcagua Jan 15 at 10:20
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    Worth noting: if one talks about lifespan informally, an object which is moved via std::move would change this pointers. Formally we would say those are two different objects, but informally one may think of them as "the same," which could breed confusion if one is not paying attention. – Cort Ammon - Reinstate Monica Jan 15 at 20:08
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Is the value of this pointer guaranteed to be constant during a lifetime of a particular object?

Yes.

As user Aconcagua puts it: the value of this pointer always is the value of the address of the object on which the function was called on1. So the question is equivalent with:

Can an object change its memory address over life time?

This is not possible, by definition of lifetime2. The lifetime of an object begins when or after its storage is obtained and ends before of when it is released.


1) [class.this]/1

In the body of a non-static ([class.mfct]) member function, the keyword this is a prvalue whose value is a pointer to the object for which the function is called.

2) [basic.life]/1 (emphasis mine)

The lifetime of an object or reference is a runtime property of the object or reference. A variable is said to have vacuous initialization if it is default-initialized and, if it is of class type or a (possibly multi-dimensional) array thereof, that class type has a trivial default constructor. The lifetime of an object of type T begins when:

  • storage with the proper alignment and size for type T is obtained, and
  • its initialization (if any) is complete (including vacuous initialization) ([dcl.init]), except that if the object is a union member or subobject thereof, its lifetime only begins if that union member is the initialized member in the union ([dcl.init.aggr], [class.base.init]), or as described in [class.union].

The lifetime of an object o of type T ends when:

  • if T is a non-class type, the object is destroyed, or
  • if T is a class type, the destructor call starts, or
  • the storage which the object occupies is released, or is reused by an object that is not nested within o ([intro.object]).
  • Does this mean that it would be impossible (illegal) for a sufficiently complex runtime to implement automated memory compaction for a C++ program? Or does it just mean that it would need to behave "as-if", so as to provide the same value of this every time, regardless of movements in the heap? – Alexander - Reinstate Monica Jan 15 at 19:02
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    @Alex clearly the as-if rule prevails. Always. – YSC Jan 15 at 19:03
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    @Alexander-ReinstateMonica the vtable is a similar concept that reduces performance, but it's accepted since the benefits outweigh the downside. Modern processors are really efficient with indirection. – Mark Ransom Jan 15 at 20:41
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    @MarkRansom "is a pointer guaranteed to be the address of an object, or is the compiler free to add a level of indirection?" By definition that ptr is the address of an object, but "address" could be an high level abstract concept. But then if you introduce indirection, you need atomicity, you need locking, you need a bunch of additional work on all accesses of any object, if there are threads. Simply by the look and feel of it I can it's unworkable (and I haven't even considered the fact C/C++ doubles as a low level language). – curiousguy Jan 15 at 21:38
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    @curiousguy you make good points, and I'm no longer arguing that indirection would be practical. It still makes a good thought experiment though. – Mark Ransom Jan 15 at 21:47
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An object has a region of storage. this points there.

[intro.object]/1

An object occupies a region of storage in its period of construction ([class.cdtor]), throughout its lifetime, and in its period of destruction ([class.cdtor]).

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