1

Background

I have a rails model that contains an ActiveRecord::Enum. I have a view helper that takes a value of this enum, and returns one of several possible responses. Suppose the cases were called enum_cases, for example:

enum_cases = [:a, :b, :c]

def foo(input)
    case input
    when :a then 1
    when :b then 2
    when :c then 3
    else raise NotImplementedError, "Unhandled new case: #{input}"
    end
end

I want to unit-test this code. Checking the happy paths is trivial:

class FooHelperTests < ActionView::TestCase
  test "foo handles all enum cases" do
    assert_equal foo(:a), 1
    assert_equal foo(:b), 2
    assert_equal foo(:c), 3
    assert_raises NotImplementedError do
        foo(:d)
    end
  end
end

However, this has a flaw. If new cases are added (e.g. :z), foo will raise an error to bring our attention to it, and add it as a new case. But nothing stops you from forgetting to update the test to test for the new behaviour for :z. Now I know that's mainly the job of code coverage tools, and we do use one, but just not to such a strict level that single-line gaps will blow up. Plus this is kind of a learning exercise, anyway.

So I amended my test:

test "foo handles all enum cases" do
  remaining_cases = enum_cases.to_set

  tester = -> (arg) do
    remaining_cases.delete(arg)
    foo(arg)
  end

  assert_equal tester.call(:a), 1
  assert_equal tester.call(:b), 2
  assert_equal tester.call(:c), 3
  assert_raises NotImplementedError do
    tester.call(:d)
  end

  assert_empty remaining_cases, "Not all cases were tested! Remaining: #{remaining_cases}"
end

This works great, however it's got 2 responsibilities, and it's a pattern I end up copy/pasting (I have multiple functions to test like this):

  1. Perform the actual testing of foo
  2. Do book keeping to ensure all params were exhausitvely checked.

I would like to make this test more focused by removing as much boiler plate as possible, and extracting it out to a place where it can easily be reused.

Attempted solution

In another language, I would just extract a simple test helper:

class ExhaustivityChecker
  def initialize(all_values, proc)
    @remaining_values = all_values.to_set
    @proc = proc
  end

  def run(arg, allow_invalid_args: false)
    assert @remaining_values.include?(arg) unless allow_invalid_args 
    @remaining_values.delete(arg)
    @proc.call(arg)
  end

  def assert_all_values_checked
    assert_empty @remaining_values, "Not all values were tested! Remaining: #{@remaining_values}"
  end
end

Which I could easily use like:

test "foo handles all enum cases" do
    tester = ExhaustivityChecker.new(enum_cases, -> (arg) { foo(arg) })

    assert_equal tester.run(:a), 1
    assert_equal tester.run(:b), 2
    assert_equal tester.run(:c), 3
    assert_raises NotImplementedError do
        tester.run(:d, allow_invalid_args: true)
    end

    tester.assert_all_values_checked
end

I could then reuse this class in other tests, just by passing it different all_values and proc arguments, and remembering to call assert_all_values_checked.

Issue

However, this breaks because I can't call assert and assert_empty from a class that isn't a subclass of ActionView::TestCase. Is it possible to subclass/include some class/module to gain access to these methods?

1 Answer 1

1

enum_cases must be kept up to date when the production logic changes violating the DRY principle. This makes it more likely for there to be a mistake. Furthermore it is test code living in production, another red flag.

We can solve this by refactoring the case into a Hash lookup making it data driven. And also giving it a name describing what it's associated with and what it does, these are "handlers". I've also turned it into a method call making it easier to access and which will bear fruit later.

def foo_handlers
  {
    a: 1,
    b: 2,
    c: 3
  }.freeze
end

def foo(input)
  foo_handlers.fetch(input)
rescue KeyError
  raise NotImplementedError, "Unhandled new case: #{input}"
end

Hash#fetch is used to raise a KeyError if the input is not found.

Then we can write a data driven test by looping through, not foo_handlers, but a seemingly redundant expected Hash defined in the tests.

class FooHelperTests < ActionView::TestCase
  test "foo handles all expected inputs" do
    expected = {
      a: 1,
      b: 2,
      c: 3
    }.freeze

    # Verify expect has all the cases.
    assert_equal expect.keys.sort, foo_handlers.keys.sort

    # Drive the test with the expected results, not with the production data.
    expected.keys do |key|
      # Again, using `fetch` to get a clear KeyError rather than nil.
      assert_equal foo(key), expected.fetch(value)
    end
  end

  # Simplify the tests by separating happy path from error path.
  test "foo raises NotImplementedError if the input is not handled" do
    assert_raises NotImplementedError do
      # Use something that obviously does not exist to future proof the test.
      foo(:does_not_exist)
    end
  end
end

The redundancy between expected and foo_handlers is by design. You still need to change the pairs in both places, there's no way around that, but now you'll always get a failure when foo_handlers changes but the tests do not.

  • When a new key/value pair is added to foo_handlers the test will fail.
  • If a key is missing from expected the test will fail.
  • If someone accidentally wipes out foo_handlers the test will fail.
  • If the values in foo_handlers are wrong, the test will fail.
  • If the logic of foo is broken, the test will fail.

Initially you're just going to copy foo_handlers into expected. After that it becomes a regression test testing that the code still works even after refactoring. Future changes will incrementally change foo_handlers and expected.


But wait, there's more! Code which is hard to test is probably hard to use. Conversely, code which is easy to test is easy to use. With a few more tweaks we can use this data-driven approach to make production code more flexible.

If we make foo_handlers an accessor with a default that comes from a method, not a constant, now we can change how foo behaves for individual objects. This may or may not be desirable for your particular implementation, but its in your toolbox.

class Thing
  attr_accessor :foo_handlers

  # This can use a constant, as long as the method call is canonical.
  def default_foo_handlers
    {
      a: 1,
      b: 2,
      c: 3
    }.freeze
  end

  def initialize
    @foo_handlers = default_foo_handlers
  end

  def foo(input)
    foo_handlers.fetch(input)
  rescue KeyError
    raise NotImplementedError, "Unhandled new case: #{input}"
  end
end

Now individual objects can define their own handlers or change the values.

thing = Thing.new
puts thing.foo(:a) # 1
puts thing.foo(:b) # 2

thing.foo_handlers = { a: 23 }
puts thing.foo(:a) # 23
puts thing.foo(:b) # NotImplementedError

And, more importantly, a subclass can change their handlers. Here we add to the handlers using Hash#merge.

class Thing::More < Thing
  def default_foo_handlers
    super.merge(
      d: 4,
      e: 5
    )
  end
end

thing = Thing.new
more = Thing::More.new

puts more.foo(:d)  # 4
puts thing.foo(:d) # NotImplementedError

If a key requires more than a simple value, use method names and call them with Object#public_send. Those methods can then be unit tested.

def foo_handlers
  {
    a: :handle_a,
    b: :handle_b,
    c: :handle_c
  }.freeze
end

def foo(input)
  public_send(foo_handlers.fetch(input), input)
rescue KeyError
  raise NotImplementedError, "Unhandled new case: #{input}"
end

def handle_a(input)
  ...
end

def handle_b(input)
  ...
end

def handle_c(input)
  ...
end
6
  • Hey Schwern, thanks for your response! I should have been more clear, enum_cases is just a stand-in for an ActiveRecord::Enum, that lets you programatically access all cases, as defined in your ActiveRecord. The helper methods return different content_tag values, I don't know if those have side effects, I think they don't as long as you don't use them with concat.
    – Alexander
    Commented Jan 16, 2020 at 1:23
  • @Alexander-ReinstateMonica You should update the question with that information, it gives a more canonical location for the production data. The technique remains the same. You want to know that you've tested all possible values of an enum column. Let's call it status. foo_handlers is replaced by YourClass.statuses. Check your test cases are in sync with assert_equal expect.keys.sort, YourClass.statuses.keys.sort and drive your tests with YourClass.statuses.keys do |key|. I don't think content_tag has side-effects, but if it does use the handler method technique at the end.
    – Schwern
    Commented Jan 16, 2020 at 1:35
  • "it gives a more canonical location for the production data" hahah
    – Alexander
    Commented Jan 16, 2020 at 2:43
  • This is great, I'll implement it tomorrow and follow up if I have any issues. I'm still curious on the prospect of calling assert and friends from non-test-case helper classes (for other cases). Any insight on that?
    – Alexander
    Commented Jan 16, 2020 at 2:51
  • @Alexander-ReinstateMonica I use RSpec, so I can only comment generally. Writing tools to help with testing is normal, otherwise we'd just have assert_equal. It can make testing easier and DRY the tests. However, custom test tools can also make the tests harder to understand, cover up bad design, and it's more code to maintain. First try to improve the code to make it easier to test. This makes the code better, the tests simpler, and it's less code to maintain. If you do write a test utility class, divorce it from the production code, document it, and test it like any other class.
    – Schwern
    Commented Jan 16, 2020 at 3:18

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