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I have written a UI in Electron and I would like to connect it with my C++ code. However, I will be selling this product and so I would like to know if this makes it easier for people to crack my C++ code? Obviously I know compiled C++ can be cracked anyway, but does this affect it in any way?

Additionally, what is the best way to go about this while preserving maximum possible security?

Thanks.

EDIT: How about this? Is it possible to use c++ as back-end for Electron.js?

EDIT2: To clarify, my Electron app will be showing the status of operations being performed in the C++ program. As such, I will need to send lists, dictionaries, strings etc. from C++ to JS which will then render it. Additionally, buttons on my Electron app need to trigger actions in the C++ code, such as stopping or starting certain parts of the program.

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  • What do you mean connect it ? Like message passing ?
    – Xatyrian
    Jan 16, 2020 at 17:45
  • It is fairly easy to peek into the JS code of electron apps, this means the API for your C++ library will be discoverable. You would also be giving the library to your users anyways, so they could use other tools to determine the library's API.
    – Romen
    Jan 16, 2020 at 17:45
  • @Xatyrian I need to pass data like lists, dictionaries and strings from my C++ code to my Electron GUI in realtime. And my electron GUI needs to be able to send data to C++ in the same way.
    – Jack P
    Jan 16, 2020 at 17:47
  • @Romen Is there any way to get around this?
    – Jack P
    Jan 16, 2020 at 17:48
  • Write the entire application in C++ and do not export any functions like you would with a DLL.
    – Romen
    Jan 16, 2020 at 17:49

1 Answer 1

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I have written a UI in Electron and I would like to connect it with my C++ code ... I would like to know if this makes it easier for people to crack my C++ code?

Using electron does not make any meaningful difference for protecting the C++ source code. (Your intellectual property)

The Javascript code running in electron will be very easy to reverse engineer though, which gives users a head start on experimenting with your C++ binary. Using minification and obfuscation tools can at least make that harder.

For the C++ side, connecting C++ to Electron can be done in at least these two ways:

  • By dynamically linking to a shared library (Node.js C++ Addons)
    In this case your C++ API would be functions that get exported by the shared library. There are many tools to inspect shared libraries (DLLs) and view these functions.
  • By communicating with another process using some sort of Inter-process communication.
    In this case your API would depend on the IPC method used. If it was TCP/UDP messages you could use Wireshark to inspect the packets between the processes. There are ways to inspect messages going over any type of IPC.

Either way, your application must be delivered to the end-user with a compiled binary. Preventing reverse engineering of the binary itself is impossible if you actually give the binary to your users.

You should also expect that a savvy end-user will have access to other tools that can inspect the API and implement third-party code that talks to that API.

Additionally, what is the best way to go about this while preserving maximum possible security?

By "maximum possible security", I will assume you are referring to preventing unauthorized use of the C++ code with other applications.

You would need a licensing system that can authenticate the application that is using your C++ binary's API. Explaining what that would be exactly is probably too large of an answer for a Stack Overflow, and you will have to do some research on how licensing systems are implemented.

It may be theoretically impossible to develop a perfect licensing system though. Look at the gaming industry, it takes just a matter of days to for the licensing software become circumvented for every new game that is released. The only software architecture that cracks haven't completely conquered are cloud-based applications, which don't actually deliver compiled code with their business logic to the end-user's computer.

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