57

Is there any way to access caller-scoped variables from an anonymous inner class in Java?

Here's the sample code to understand what I need:

public Long getNumber(final String type, final String refNumber, final Long year) throws ServiceException {
    Long result = null;
    try {
        Session session = PersistenceHelper.getSession();
        session.doWork(new Work() {
                public void execute(Connection conn) throws SQLException {
                    CallableStatement st = conn.prepareCall("{ CALL PACKAGE.procedure(?, ?, ?, ?) }");
                    st.setString(1, type);
                    st.setString(2, refNumber);
                    st.setLong(3, year);
                    st.registerOutParameter(4, OracleTypes.NUMBER);
                    st.execute();
                    result = st.getLong(4) ;
                }
            });
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.error(e);
    }
    return result;
}

The code is in a DAO service class. Obviously it doesn't compile, because it asks that result be final, if it is -- it doesn't compile because I try to modify a final var. I'm bound to JDK5. Other than dropping the doWork() altogether, is there a way to set the result value from within doWork()?

64

Java doesn't know that doWork is going to be synchronous and that the stack frame that result is in will still be there. You need to alter something that isn't in the stack.

I think this would work

 final Long[] result = new Long[1];

and then

 result[0] = st.getLong(4);

in execute(). At the end, you need to return result[0];

6
  • 5
    Although this will work, it is a bit of an ugly hack. I think you should use a named inner class instead of an anonymous one if you want to return values like that. It is 'cleaner' IMHO. – Robin May 12 '11 at 14:52
  • 64
    This is so dirty, I want to take a shower now, just because I read it :) – chzbrgla Oct 16 '12 at 10:00
  • 9
    I just puked on my keyboard, and then out of laziness for not wanting to create a holder class, I did just this. – Piwaf Mar 10 '16 at 22:18
  • 3
    @chzbrgla After taking a shower, following solution worked for me. public static final AtomicLong RESULT = new AtomicLong(0); RESULT.set(st.getLong(4);); – M Faisal Hameed Feb 4 '17 at 10:50
  • Ok, even IntelliJ suggests this, but it doesn't look like it's the standard solution... – caligula May 11 '17 at 20:08
17

This situation arises a lot in Java, and the cleanest way to handle it is with a simple value container class. It's the same type thing as the array approach, but it's cleaner IMO.

public class ValContainer<T> {
    private T val;

    public ValContainer() {
    }

    public ValContainer(T v) {
        this.val = v;
    }

    public T getVal() {
        return val;
    }

    public void setVal(T val) {
        this.val = val;
    }
}
3
  • any references? I need to find some documents regarding this approach? is there? – Aritra Chakraborty Jul 9 '15 at 16:10
  • 3
    @Aritra, it would be hard to find references for something like this, but I've been doing java for 14yrs and really when you need to get a return value from a method (aside from it's actual return value) you have to pass an object, and let that object have properties that you can inspect upon the return. My little snippet of code is just a generic way of doing it, and is a little cleaner than using an array for this purpose, or a dedicated class just for getting "an out parameter". – user2080225 Jul 13 '15 at 19:12
  • that helped...+1 – Parnab Sanyal Apr 18 '17 at 12:50
9

Long is immutable. If you use a mutable class, holding a long value, you can change the value. For example:

public class Main {

public static void main( String[] args ) throws Exception {
    Main a = new Main();
    System.out.println( a.getNumber() );
}

public void doWork( Work work ) {
    work.doWork();
}


public Long getNumber() {
    final LongHolder result = new LongHolder();
    doWork( new Work() {
        public void doWork() {
            result.value = 1L;
        }
    } );
    return result.value;
}

private static class LongHolder { 
    public Long value; 
}

private static abstract class Work {
    public abstract void doWork();
}

}
9

You need a 'container' to hold your value. You, however, do not have to create a container class. You may use classes in the java.util.concurrent.atomic package. They provide an immutable wrapper for a value along with a set and a get method. You have AtomicInteger, AtomicBoolean, AtomicReference<V> (for your objects) e.t.c

In the outer method:

final AtomicLong resultHolder = new AtomicLong();

In the anonymous inner class method

long result = getMyLongValue();
resultHolder.set(result);

Later in your outer method

return resultHolder.get();

Here's an example.

public Long getNumber() {
   final AtomicLong resultHolder = new AtomicLong();
   Session session = new Session();
   session.doWork(new Work() {
       public void execute() {
           //Inside anonymous inner class
           long result = getMyLongValue();
           resultHolder.set(result);
       }
   });
   return resultHolder.get(); //Returns the value of result
}
8

If the containing class is MyClass -->

MyClass.this.variable = value;

Do not remember if this would work with a private variable (I think it would work).

Only works for attributes of the class (class variable). Does not work for method local variables. In JSE 7 probably there will be closures to do that kind of thing.

2
  • Java 7 won't have closures. And even when they are introduced in Java 8, they probably won't be able to write to local variables (i.e. the "local-variables-that-are-accessed-must-be-final" rule will probably still hold). – Joachim Sauer May 12 '11 at 12:21
  • Bit late to comment, but this does seem to work in Java 8 – Govind Parmar Jan 30 '19 at 22:46
2

Anonymous classes/methods are not closures - this is exactly the difference.

The problem is that doWork() could create a new thread to call execute() and getNumber() could return before the result is set - and even more problematically: where should execute() write the result when the stack frame that contains the variable is gone? Languages with closures have to introduce a mechanism to keep such variables alive outside their original scope (or ensure that the closure is not executed in a separate thread).

A workaround:

Long[] result = new Long[1];
...
result[0] = st.getLong(4) ;
...
return result[0];
2

The standard solution to this is to return a value. See, for instance, ye olde java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged.

So the code would look something like this:

public Long getNumber(
    final String type, final String refNumber, final Long year
) throws ServiceException {
    try {
        Session session = PersistenceHelper.getSession();
        return session.doWork(new Work<Long>() {
            public Long execute(Connection conn) throws SQLException {
                CallableStatement st = conn.prepareCall("{ CALL PACKAGE.procedure(?, ?, ?, ?) }");
                try {
                    st.setString(1, type);
                    st.setString(2, refNumber);
                    st.setLong(3, year);
                    st.registerOutParameter(4, OracleTypes.NUMBER);
                    st.execute();
                    return st.getLong(4);
                } finally {
                    st.close();
                }
            }
        });
    } catch (Exception e) {
        throw ServiceException(e);
    }
}

(Also fixed the potential resource leak, and returning null for any error.)

Update: So apparently Work is from a third-party library and can't be altered. So I suggest not using it, at least isolate your application from so that you are not using it directly. Something like:

public interface WithConnection<T> {
    T execute(Connection connnection) throws SQLException;
}
public class SessionWrapper {
    private final Session session;
    public SessionWrapper(Session session) {
        session = nonnull(session);
    }
    public <T> T withConnection(final WithConnection<T> task) throws Service Exception {
        nonnull(task);
        return new Work() {
            T result;
            {
                session.doWork(this);
            }
            public void execute(Connection connection) throws SQLException {
                result = task.execute(connection);
            }
        }.result;
    }
}
2
  • Work is an interface in org.hibernate.jdbc, the signature for execute is public void execute(java.sql.Connection). Would it really eat that return type up & work? – TC1 May 16 '11 at 11:25
  • I'm sorry, but I don't really get the second (updated) part of your answer. I'm having the problem with the inner anonymous class of a listener (and can't make it return something since it's an override). Do you essentially use this? Or is there another concept I need to get my head around? Or should I just ask a completely new question? – caligula May 11 '17 at 20:26
1

As of Hibernate 4, the method Session#doReturningWork(ReturningWork<T> work) will return the return val from the inner method:

public Long getNumber(final String type, final String refNumber, final Long year) throws ServiceException {
    try {
        Session session = PersistenceHelper.getSession();
        return session.doReturningWork(conn -> {
            CallableStatement st = conn.prepareCall("{ CALL PACKAGE.procedure(?, ?, ?, ?) }");
            st.setString(1, type);
            st.setString(2, refNumber);
            st.setLong(3, year);
            st.registerOutParameter(4, OracleTypes.NUMBER);
            st.execute();
            return st.getLong(4);
        });
    } catch (Exception e) {
        log.error(e);
    }
    return null;
}

(Cleaned up using a Java 8 lambda)

0

Using AtomicLong helped me in a very similar situation and the code looked clean.

// Create a new final AtomicLong variable with the initial value 0.
final AtomicLong YOUR_VARIABLE = new AtomicLong(0);
...
// set long value to the variable within inner class
YOUR_VARIABLE.set(LONG_VALUE);
...
// get the value even outside the inner class
YOUR_VARIABLE.get();

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