130

I was reading the MDN's manual on Promise, and I found these two methods which seem similar to me:

Both of them take an iterable and return an array containing the fulfilled Promises.

So, what is the difference between them?

5
  • 3
    all is executed for resolved promises, allSettled is any that are finished - resolved and rejected. The first sentence of each article outlines this difference.
    – VLAZ
    Jan 17, 2020 at 9:08
  • 1
    @Raymond Which website your referencing??
    – ezio4df
    Jan 17, 2020 at 9:12
  • 1
    and return an array neither of them return an array, they return a Promise that could possibly resolve to an array ... but in the case of .all the promise returned does not always resolve to an array - it's right there in the first line of the documentation - in fact, read the first paragraph of each of the documentation you linked to, and you have your answer Jan 17, 2020 at 10:25
  • 1
    Thanks to all, I got the answer. And now on, I will read manuals with more focus.
    – ezio4df
    Jan 17, 2020 at 10:28
  • so why not just finally?
    – Nikos
    Jan 24 at 21:09

4 Answers 4

219

Promise.all will reject as soon as one of the Promises in the array rejects.

Promise.allSettled will never reject - it will resolve once all Promises in the array have either rejected or resolved.

Their resolve values are different as well. Promise.all will resolve to an array of each of the values that the Promises resolve to - eg [Promise.resolve(1), Promise.resolve(2)] will turn into [1, 2]. Promise.allSettled will instead give you [{ status : 'fulfilled', value: 1 }, { status : 'fulfilled', value: 2 }].

Promise.all([Promise.resolve(1), Promise.resolve(2)])
  .then(console.log);
Promise.allSettled([Promise.resolve(1), Promise.resolve(2)])
  .then(console.log);

If one of the Promises rejects, the Promise.all will reject with a value of the rejection, but Promise.allSettled will resolve with an object of { status: 'rejected', reason: <error> } at that place in the array.

Promise.all([Promise.reject(1), Promise.resolve(2)])
  .catch((err) => {
    console.log('err', err);
  });
Promise.allSettled([Promise.reject(1), Promise.resolve(2)])
  .then(console.log);

37

Promise.all: It resolves only when all promises passed to it ( as an array) resolves else it will reject with the first rejected promise error.

Promise.allSettled: This one will always get resolved with an array having info about resolved and rejected promises. Have a close look at following properties (status, value, reason ) of resulting array.

Example 1:

const pms1 = Promise.resolve(1);
// setTimeout(function, milliseconds, param1, param2, ...)
const pms2 = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  setTimeout(resolve, 200, 2);
});
const pms3 = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  setTimeout(resolve, 100, 3);
});
const pmsAry = [pms1, pms2, pms3];

Promise.all(pmsAry)
  .then(resAry => console.log(resAry)) // resAry order is same as pmsAry order
  .catch(error => console.log(error));

/* 
 * Note here we are not writing 'catch' because Promise.allSettled ALWAYS RESOLVES
 * with array containing information about resolved or rejected promises
 */
Promise.allSettled(pmsAry)
.then(resAry => console.log(resAry)); // resAry order is same as pmsAry order

Output :

[1, 2, 3] 
// Promise.all output ORDER doesn't depend on promise resolution time

[{ status: "fulfilled", value: 1 },
 { status: "fulfilled", value: 2 }, 
 { status: "fulfilled", value: 3 }]
// Promise.allSettled output ORDER doesn't depend on promise resolution time

Example 2:

const pms1 = Promise.resolve(1);
const pms2 = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  setTimeout(reject, 200, '200ms Err');
});
const pms3 = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  setTimeout(reject, 100, '100ms Err');
});
const pmsAry = [pms1, pms2, pms3];

Promise.all(pmsAry)
  .then(resAry => console.log(resAry))
  .catch(error => console.log(error));

Promise.allSettled(pmsAry)
  .then(resAry => console.log(resAry));

Output :

100ms Err
/* 
 * Note: Here there are TWO promises which are getting REJECTED but output is
 * ONLY ONE (i.e the one which is getting rejected FIRST) 
 */

[{ status: "fulfilled", value: 1 },             // Note: value
 { status: "rejected", reason: "200ms Err" },   
 { status: "rejected", reason: "100ms Err" }]   // Note: reason
8

When you want to make sure that the promise should all be resolved/success for the operation you are using then you need to use Promise.all since it completes when it get resolved for each of the promise.

But when you just want to complete all the promises irrespective to whether they are resolved or rejected then use Promise.allSettled.

Both of them execute promises in bulk but the subtle difference is the way they are handling the promise iterations.

2
  • "subtle difference is the way they are handling the promise iterations", does that mean that the order of execution is not simultaneous in allSettled? e.g. promise1 then promise2 then promise3 etc ... Jan 27, 2021 at 11:58
  • @GotToFigure a bit late but in case somebody runs here, these is where you can find the answer to that: stackoverflow.com/questions/30823653/… Jan 13, 2023 at 14:20
7

Promise.all : It returns a promise which resolves, when all promises from an array are resolved and gets rejected if one or more promises get rejected.


Promise.allSettled : It returns a promise which resolves when all the promises in the array are settled (rejected or resolved).


Note : Both of them take an iterable and return an array containing the fulfilled Promises.

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