13

Sorry if this has already been answered here, but I couldn't find any match for our specific scenario, so here goes!

We've had a discussion in our development team, regarding function calls in angular templates. Now as a general rule of thumb, we agree that you shouldn't do these. However, we've tried to discuss when it might be okay. Let me give you a scenario.

Let's say we have a template block that is wrapped in a ngIf, that checks for multiple parameters, like here:

<ng-template *ngIf="user && user.name && isAuthorized">
 ...
</ng-template>

Would there be a significant difference in performance compared to something like this:

Template:

<ng-template *ngIf="userCheck()">
 ...
</ng-template>

Typescript:

userCheck(): boolean {
  return this.user && this.user.name && this.isAuthorized;
}

So to summarize the question, would the last option have any significant performance cost?

We would prefer to use the 2nd approach, in situations where we need to check more than 2 conditions, but many articles online says function calls are ALWAYS bad in templates, but is it really a problem in this case?

  • 7
    No, it wouldn't. And it's cleaner too, as it makes the template more readable, the condition more easily testable and reusable, and you have more tools at your disposal (the whole TypeScript language) to make it as readable and efficient as possible. I would choose a much clearer name than "userCheck", though. – JB Nizet Jan 17 at 9:52
  • Thanks a lot for your input :) – Jesper Jan 17 at 9:58
7

I also tried to avoid functions calls in templates as much as possible, but your question inspired me to do a quick research:

I added another case with caching userCheck() results

*ngIf="isUserChecked"

...
// .ts
isUserChecked = this.userCheck()

Prepared a demo here: https://stackblitz.com/edit/angular-9qgsm9

Surprisingly it looks like there is no difference between

*ngIf="user && user.name && isAuthorized"

And

*ngIf="userCheck()"

...
// .ts
userCheck(): boolean {
  return this.user && this.user.name && this.isAuthorized;
}

And

*ngIf="isUserChecked"

...
// .ts
isUserChecked = this.userCheck()

This looks like it's valid for a simple property checking, but there definitely will be a difference if it comes to any async actions, getters that are waiting for some api for example.

10

This is a pretty opinionated answer.

The usage of functions like this, is perfectly acceptable. It will make the templates much clearer, and it does not cause any significant overhead. Like JB said before, it will set a much better base for unit testing as well.

I also think that whatever expression you have in your template, will be evaluated as a function by the change detection mechanism, so it doesn't matter if you have it in your template or in your component logic.

Just keep the logic inside the function to a minimum. If you are however wary about any performance impact such a function might have, I strongly advise you to put your ChangeDetectionStrategy to OnPush, which is considered best practice anyways. With this, the function won't be called every cycle, only when an Input changes, some event happens inside the template, etc.

(using etc, because I don't know the other reason anymore).


Personally, again, I think it's even nicer to use the Observables pattern, you can then use the async pipe, and only when a new value gets emitted, the template gets re-evaluated:

userIsAuthorized$ = combineLatest([
  this.user$,
  this.isAuthorized$
]).pipe(
  map(([ user, authorized ]) => !!user && !!user.name && authorized),
  shareReplay({ refCount: true, bufferSize: 1 })
);

You can then just use in the template like this:

<ng-template *ngIf="userIsAuthorized$ | async">
 ...
</ng-template>

Yet another option would be to use ngOnChanges, if all the dependent variables to the component are Inputs, and you have a lot of logic going on to calculate a certain template variable (which is not the case you showed):

export class UserComponent implements ngOnChanges {
  userIsAuthorized: boolean = false;

  @Input()
  user?: any;

  @Input()
  isAuthorized?: boolean;

  ngOnChanges(changes: SimpleChanges): void {
    if (changes.user || changes.isAuthorized) {
      this.userIsAuthorized = this.userCheck();
    }
  }

  userCheck(): boolean {
    return this.user && this.user.name && this.isAuthorized || false;
  }
}

Which you can use in your template like this:

<ng-template *ngIf="userIsAuthorized">
 ...
</ng-template>
  • Thanks for your reply, very insightful. For our specific case though, changing detection strategy is not an option, as the component in question performs a get request, and therefore the change is not related to a specific input, but rather the get request. Nonetheless, this is very useful information for development of future components where change is dependent on input variables – Jesper Jan 17 at 10:35
  • 1
    @Jesper if the component performs a get request, then you already have an Observable stream, which will make it a perfect candidate for the 2nd option I showed. Either way, glad I could give you some insights – PierreDuc Jan 17 at 10:46
6

Is not recommended for many reasons the principal:

To determine whether userCheck() needs to be re-rendered, Angular needs to execute the userCheck() expression to check if its return value has changed.

Because Angular cannot predict whether the return value of userCheck() has changed, it needs to execute the function every time change detection runs.

So if change detection runs 300 times, the function is called 300 times, even if its return value never changes.

Extended explanation and more problems https://medium.com/showpad-engineering/why-you-should-never-use-function-calls-in-angular-template-expressions-e1a50f9c0496

The problem coming when if ur component is big and attend many change events, if you component will be litle and just attend a few events should not be a problem.

Example with observables

user$;
isAuth$
userCheck$;

userCheck$ = user$.pipe(
switchMap((user) => {
    return forkJoin([of(user), isAuth$]);
 }
)
.map(([user, isAuthenticated])=>{
   if(user && user.name && isAuthenticated){
     return true;
   } else {
     return false;
   }
})
);

Then you can use it the observable with async pipe in you code.

  • 2
    Hi, just wanted to point out that I find the suggestion of using a variable is seriously misleading.. The variable won't update is value when any of the combined values changes – nsndvd Jan 17 at 10:05
  • 1
    And whether the expression is directly in the template, or returned by a function, it will have to be evaluated at each change detection. – JB Nizet Jan 17 at 10:06
  • Yes that its true sorry will edit for not make bad practices – anthony willis muñoz Jan 17 at 10:07
  • @anthonywillismuñoz So how would you approach a situation like this? Just live with the multiple, hard-to-read conditions in the *ngIf? – Jesper Jan 17 at 10:16
  • 1
    that depends in you situation you have some options in the medium post. But I think that u are using observables. Will edit the post with an example to reduce the condition. if you can show me from where u get the conditions. – anthony willis muñoz Jan 17 at 10:30
0

I think that JavaScript was created with a goal so that a developer does not notice the difference between an expresion and a function call regarding performance.

In C++ there is a keyword inline to mark a function. For example:

inline bool userCheck()
{
    return isAuthorized;
}

This was done in order to eliminate a function call. As a result, compiler replaces all calls of userCheck with the body of the function. Reason for innovating inline? A performance boost.

Therefore, I think that execution time of a function call with one expression, probably, is slower than execution of the expresion only. But, I also think you shall not notice a difference in performance if you have just one expression in the function.

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