7

In Raku documentation it is stated that gather-take constructs are being lazy evaluated. In the following examples I have a hard time concluding about the laziness of the constructs:

say 'Iterate to Infinity is : ', (1 ... Inf).WHAT;

say 'gather is : ', gather {
    take 0;
    my ($last, $this) = 0, 1;

    loop {
        take $this;
        ($last, $this) = $this, $last + $this;
    }
}.WHAT;

say '------------------------------------';

my @f1 = lazy gather {
    take 0;
    my ($last, $this) = 0, 1;

    loop {
        take $this;
        ($last, $this) = $this, $last + $this;
    }
}

say '@f1         : ', @f1.WHAT;
say '@f1 is lazy : ', @f1.is-lazy;

say '------------------------------------';

my @f2 = 1 ... Inf;

say '@f2         : ', @f2.WHAT;
say '@f2 is lazy : ', @f2.is-lazy;

In the first case (assignement of a Seq to @f1) if we take away the "lazy" definition then the generated Sequence (with use of gather-take) is running forever (NOT lazy).

In the second case (assignement of a Seq to @f2) @f2 becomes lazy.

Why do we have a differentiation in behaviour? although we try to do the same thing: Assign a Seq to an array in a lazy way

Can someone clarify the matter ???

  • "In Raku documentation it is stated that gather-take constructs are being lazy evaluated." They can be. But not necessarily. Please provide a link to which particular doc you're reading. – raiph Jan 17 at 17:27
8

Although gather/take is designed to be a useful construct for lazy processing, it tells anyone who asks it that it isn't lazy, regardless of whether or not it contains an infinite loop:

say .is-lazy
for (gather { take 42 }),                 # False
    (gather { loop { take 42 } });        # False

So in your @f1 = gather ... case, @f1 is being assigned a sequence that says it's not lazy even though it contains an infinite loop. @ sigil'd variables take that as a cue to eagerly assign the sequence -- and the code hangs.


The prefix lazy will create a new Seq that will lazily draw from the expression on its right. The new Seq created by the lazy tells the world that it (the new Seq) is lazy:

say .is-lazy
for (lazy gather { take 42 }),            # True
    (lazy gather { loop { take 42 } });   # True

If an @ sigil'd variable is assigned a value that returns True for a call to .is-lazy, then the assignment and the variable are lazy. So the code @f1 = lazy gather ... works fine.


Finally, the sequence (1...Inf) knows it's lazy and tells the world it is without needing a prefix lazy:

say .is-lazy with (1 ... Inf)             # True

So assigning that also works fine, with or without lazy.


In summary, an @ sigil'd variable gains elements lazily if a Seq assigned to it says it's lazy, and eagerly otherwise.


You didn't ask about this, but another scenario is assigning or binding a Seq to a $ sigil'd variable, or a sigil free identifier.

As with a @ sigil'd variable, calling .is-lazy on the $ sigil'd variable or sigil free identifier will return True or False in accord with the assigned/bound Seq.

But then, regardless of whether that .is-lazy returns True or False, the Seq will still be iterated lazily.

  • 1
    FWIW, I find say .is-lazy with 1..Inf clearer to read, as it won't make you think it might iterate over the range, – Elizabeth Mattijsen Jan 17 at 19:33
  • 2
    @ElizabethMattijsen I fixed it one way that I thought made sense (say (1..Inf) .is-lazy;, so without the for). But then your comment got an upvote after that edit. Hmm. So now it's fixed to be exactly as you wrote. Language and clear coding is such a subtle thing! :) – raiph Jan 18 at 19:58

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