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I'd like to be able to create a logging mechanism, which very simply passes arguments through to printf, but I need syntax highlighting, and validation of input. This is the outline for the Log namespace I have so far.

#pragma once
#include "pch.h"

namespace Log
{   
    // Determines whether to create the console window or not.
    // Turn off for before release.
    extern bool CreateConsoleWindow;

    // Initialisation.
    extern bool Init();

    // Writes a line to the console, appended with \r\n.
    extern void WriteLine(const char* _Format, ...);

    // Writes a line to the console, with a [Debug] prepend.
    extern void DebugInfo(const char* _Format, ...);

    // Writes a line to the console, with a [Server] prepend.
    extern void ServerInfo(const char* _Format, ...);

    // Destruction.
    extern bool Dispose();
}

This is my implementation for Log::WriteLine(_Format, ...):

    // Writes a line to the console, appended with \r\n.
    void WriteLine(const char* _Format, ...)
    {
        // Print the message.
        char buffer[4096];
        va_list args;
        va_start(args, _Format);
            auto rc = vsnprintf(buffer, sizeof(buffer), _Format, args);
        va_end(args);

        // Append the new line.
        printf("\r\n");
    }

But when I do this, I lose all the validation and syntax highlighting, which is essential, being a beginner, from the input string. For instance:

auto hash = Crypto::GetHash(syntax[1].c_str()); // unsigned long, by way of multiple nested macros.
printf("Hash: %d", hash);

This would show %d in lime green, and there would be a warning on hash in the the printf, saying it won't be displayed, because it expects %lu. I rely on VS to teach me what I'm doing wrong, so that I can learn from my mistakes.

If I do the same with my function:

auto hash = Crypto::GetHash(syntax[1].c_str()); // unsigned long, by way of multiple nested macros.
Log::WriteLine("Hash: %d", hash);

Then %d is the same brown as the rest of the string, and there is no validation error.

These two things are essential. Is there any way to make this work properly? I'm new to C++ after about a decade of .NET experience, and the learning curve is massive. I thought I'd start with the basics, just an easy logging system, so I can see what is being output at any time, in a clean and elegant way. In C#, this would have only taken a couple of minutes to put together, but in C++, it's now four hours later, I have about 40 tabs open in three windows of Firefox, and I'm still smashing my head against every brick wall it's possible to come across.

I've tried to define a macro inside the namespace:

    #define WriteLine(_Format, ...) printf(_Format, __VA_ARGS__)

But is says it can't find printf. I've tried decorating with _Printf_format_string_:

    extern int _cdecl DebugInfo(_Printf_format_string_ const char* _Format, ...);

But that makes no difference. I've tried __attribute__((format(printf, 1, 2)))

    extern void WriteLine(const char* _Format, ...) __attribute__((format(printf, 1, 2)));

But that throws up a mass of errors about expecting a {, unexpected identifier, and expected a declaration, but doesn't say where, or why, or how.

Am I asking too much of C++, for such a basic request?

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Modern code editors and IDEs (and compilers!) provide additional support for the printf family of functions beyond the scope of the C++ and C languages. One prime example of that is extended error checking for the format strings, which cannot be done in C at all, and in C++ only with major pains. There are a few ways of achieving your aim with only minor modifications.

<iostreams> Solution

By default, std::cout is synchronized with printf, so you may not actually need to deal with printf directly. There are many solutions out there for how to achieve various results with the iostreams library framework, even though it is a bit of a hassle to use. It is type-safe, thus not requiring additional IDE support to directly show mistakes.

Note that iostreams has a rather bad reputation for its complexity and ease-of-use.

Typesafe Variadic Template

You can use a variadic template along the lines of:


void add_format_specifier(std::ostream& out, int const&) {
    out << "%d";
}

void add_format_specifier(std::ostream& out, char const*) {
    out << "%s";
}

void add_format_specifier(std::ostream& out, hex const&) {
    out << "%x";
}

template<typename... Args>
void WriteLine(Args&&... args) {
    std::ostringstream format;
    ((void)0, ..., add_format_specifier(format, args));
    printf(format.str().c_str(), args...);
}

This solution is type-safe and compiler-checked, again without relying on special-casing printf. Personally, I would suggest going down this route, as it combines maximum flexibility with easy type-checking - and does away with the format specifier ;). You may wish to decide whether using printf as the low-level primitive is really what you want to do here, but it is easily exchanged for other methods of output.

Compile-Time Checking of a Format String

It is possible to add custom compile-time checking of format specifiers that you can then static_assert. The basic building blocks that you need is a variadic template that also takes your format specifier (basically, you need to preserve types inside your variadic function), and which calls a format specifier along the lines of:

template<std::size_t N>
consteval bool check_format(char const (&format)[N], std::size_t i) {
    for(; i < N; ++i) {
        if(format[i] == '%') {
            if(i + 1 >= N) {
                return false;
            }
            if(format[i + 1] == '%') {
                ++i; // skip literal '%'
            } else {
                return false; // no more specifiers expected
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
}

template<std::size_t N, typename T, typename... Args>
consteval bool check_format(char const (&format)[N], std::size_t i) {
    for(; i < N; ++i) {
        if(format[i] == '%') {
            if(i + 1 >= N) {
                return false; // unterminated format specifier
            }
            if(format[i + 1] == '%') {
                ++i; // skip literal '%'
            } else {
                if constexpr(std::is_same_v<T, int>) {
                    // quickly check if it is an acceptable integer format specifier
                    if(format[i + 1] != 'd' && format[i + 1] != 'x') {
                        return false;
                    } else {
                        return check_format<N, Args...>(format, i + 2);
                    }
                } else {
                    return false; // unknown format specifier
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}

See here for a bit more context. (Note: This example relies on the C++20 consteval specifier, which may not be supported by your compiler. Similar effects can be achieved with constexpr.)

This solution will give you compile-time errors, but no syntax highlighting - C++ cannot impact how your IDE draws strings (yet ;) ).

Macro Solution

While your macro #define WriteLine(_Format, ...) printf(_Format, __VA_ARGS__) does not really allow you to do all that much with respect to implementing anything beyond renaming printf, it will work, provided that the user code also include <cstdio>. If you provide a header with that macro, you may wish to just add the inclusion in there for ease of use.

There is only a tiny improvement to be made, so that the macro also works for calls of the form WriteLine("abc"):

#include <cstdio>
#define WriteLine(_Format, ...) printf(_Format __VA_OPT__(,) __VA_ARGS__)
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  • Thank you so much for your clear explanation, and taking the time to explain this in such detail. I've tried every method you've suggested, and nothing here has worked how I need it to. If it doesn't look and act exactly like printf, it's useless to me. I can't believe that it's impossible to do something like this in C++, which is just purely automatic in C#. Log.WriteLine($"Hello {"World"} {0}");. I need the blue squiggly lines to tell me something is wrong, or I'll be tearing my hair out every time I Build. The define still doesn't work at all: namespace "Log" has no member "printf"
    – Apache
    Jan 19 '20 at 0:28
  • Note: Marked as correct answer because this answer will suffice for most people looking back at this question. While it did not solve my problem, it seems like my specific requirements are unattainable, which is what this answer deduced. The struggle continues...
    – Apache
    Jan 19 '20 at 0:31
  • For purposes of completion, I've decided to forgo stylistic elegance, and just use printf for all logging. I've deleted the namespace, as it's only purpose was to create an elegant an prettified way of outputting text to a console. If that is not possible how I need it to be, then the namespace is redundant. I've used the macro solution from this post to give some semblance of code elegance by hiding the all lower-case name, but nothing beyond that.
    – Apache
    Jan 19 '20 at 0:37
  • 1
    @Apache Macros just perform basic string replacement and therefore interact weirdly withnamespace. I am unsure what you are actually compiling (the example works fine), but I guess it might be something along this.
    – gha.st
    Jan 19 '20 at 0:38
  • 1
    Turns out that VC++ (still?) does not support the standard __VA_OPT__, but it will silently ignore the trailing comma, which makes it hard to provide a portable solution
    – gha.st
    Jan 19 '20 at 13:58

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