38

In C# you can mark a class as internal so that it is only accessible from within the same package. Is there anything similar in Java?

  • 3
    Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2534733/java-protected-classes – pintxo May 12 '11 at 16:19
  • 2
    @cmmi: Not really a duplicate, as the question is asked from an entirely different perspective. Same answer though. – Steven Jeuris May 12 '11 at 16:21
  • 6
    Note that C# doesn't have packages- They have namespaces and assemblies. Packages are equivalent to namespaces. But Assemblies can be compared to JAR files in Java. The internal modifier makes a class only accessible within an assembly. As such it has nothing to do with namespaces or packages. – nedR Feb 5 '14 at 14:45
55

You can create package-private classes by omitting the security modifier (public, private) from the class's declaration.

package com.sample;

class MyPackagePrivateClass
{
    ...
}
  • 1
    package is way better encapsulation than assembly – hB0 Oct 22 '13 at 18:57
  • 16
    @hB0 : No way! How would you declare an "internal" helper class refereced in different packages? You simply cannot – Lotfi Jan 8 '14 at 8:31
  • 1
    What I meant is "a better way of software design" not more feature intensive (which MS always comes with) – hB0 Jan 8 '14 at 15:00
  • 3
    While I agree a package is a definition far from namespace, programming several parts of a class library which may somewhat get weird, when classes have to call each other, but you don't want them to be accessible from outside that library AND then if you want to achieve this, you can't have these classes on separate packages. Create a "Internal" package maybe, for classes used only by the own library maybe would be the safest way out. – Felype Feb 25 '15 at 13:58
  • 2
    Jar visible modifiers are not part of Java due to the nature jars are packaged. One can manually zip together already compiled classes (I had to do this on various occasions) - if "internal" was possible in java, that would allow one to easily access "internal" methods between classes which shouldn't have such visibility between them. A jar is not encapsulated in a strict manner as a dll is. – Radu Simionescu Dec 11 '15 at 8:17
8

Dropping the access modifier is similar to internal in C#.

C#

public class A
{
    public static int X;
    internal static int Y;
    private static int Z;
}
internal class B
{
    public static int X;
    internal static int Y;
    private static int Z;
    public class C
    {
        public static int X;
        internal static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
    private class D
    {
        public static int X;
        internal static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
}

Java

public class A
{
    public static int X;
    static int Y;
    private static int Z;
}
class B
{
    public static int X;
    static int Y;
    private static int Z;
    public class C
    {
        public static int X;
        static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
    private class D
    {
        public static int X;
        static int Y;
        private static int Z;
    }
}

Source: http://www.javacamp.org/javavscsharp/internal.html

  • 1
    That will work ONLY if the classes A,B,C,D are in the same package.. While in C# they just have to be in the same namespace, – User1234 Jan 14 '16 at 12:03
  • 11
    @User1234 in the same assembly, not namespace. – Roland Mar 14 '16 at 18:11
5

this Question has an accepted answer before but I think the answer is not fully clear for some one who is new in java coming from .Net.

Does java have some exact equivalent for internal modifier in C# ? short answer is NO (but you can achieve it some how and i will tell)!!

internal in C# is actually an "assembly-private" modifier. what is an assembly ?

Assembly is any product of your project (DLL or EXE in C# - equivalent in java can be a JAR file)

there is not any exact equivalent for internal in java. and what has been answered by Bryan Kyle and accepted is actually "package-private" (packages in java are equivalent for namespaces in C#) but some how what has been answered is the closest way to get the same result.

BUT how to get a fully same result as internal ? cant java have a solution for this ? the answer is YES.

it does have. but not with a modifier. actually the best way to do this is a secret in packaging. the best practice of packing is to pack your classes by their relation not by their type.

many of us use packages named "Models" or "Presenters" and put all our models or presenters in them. while this is so damn wrong. packages should be like "Book" containing "BookModel.java", "BookPresenter.java" , .....

this way you can make them package-private by omitting the modifier and have not any problem because you can access them in any class which need your package-private class because you have a good practice of packaging.

1

Yes. It's called package private, you just define the class without any modifiers:

package com.blah; class Foo{ }

1

I'm not familiar with C#, but in Java the default protection is that something is only accessible within the package:

public=accessible by anyone

private=accessible only within the current class

protected=accessible within the package or in any class that inherits from the current class

default=accessible within the package

I've always thought there should be a way to say "accessible by any class that inherits from the current class but not from anywhere else, this package or any other". But there isn't.

  • 1
    For your last comment, C# has "protected internal" – projectshave Sep 1 '15 at 13:47
  • @projectshave nope its wrong. "protected internal" in C# can be accessed from allover your assembly too. actually to limit access of a class only to its subclasses in C# juse use "protected". while in java "protected" will be accessible from the same package plus to subclasses. – Amir Ziarati Nov 6 '16 at 6:56
0

You can make a class package local. This is the default scope for a class. i.e. where you have no access modifiers.

If you really want to put sometime you can create an annotation e.g. @package_local, I do this in places where I speicifc want it to be package local and didn't just leave it unspecificed.

0

Yes, the default (package private) access level. Just leave out any access modifier on your class definition and you get what you want.

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