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I am currently learning OOP and ran into a problem of dunder methods and inheritance.

I have 2 parent classes (both with their own init) that inherit to a subclass, and i want a string representation of the data initialized in all the classes, together.

This is the problem:

#Parent class 1:

class Contact:

    all_contacts = []

    def __init__(self,name='',email='',**kwargs):
        self.name = name
        self.email = email
        Contact.all_contacts.append(self)

    def __str__(self):
        return f'the name is {self.name}, and the mail is {self.mail}.'

#Parent class 2:

class AddressHolder:
    def __init__(self, street='', city='', state='', code='', **kwargs):
        self.street = street
        self.city = city
        self.state = state
        self.code = code

    def __str__(self):
        return f'the street is {self.street}, the city is {self.city}, 
               the state is {self.state}, the code is {self.code}'

#Subclass that inherits from both parent classes:

class Friends(Contact, AddressHolder):
    def __init__(self, phone='', **kwargs):
        self.phone = phone
        super().__init__(**kwargs)

    def __str__(self):
        return f'''The phone is {self.phone}.'''

#The instance of the class

f = Friends(phone='aphone', name='aname', mail='amail', 
street='astreet', city='acity', state='astate', code='acode')

print(f)

This will only print phone initialization.

Tried this to make it so all __str__ are printed, but it didn't worked:


    def __str__(self):
        super(Contact.self).__str__()
        super(AddressHolder.self).__str__()
        return f'''The phone is {self.phone}.'''

Originally, i tried to put all into the Friends subclass like this since it was inherited, it should work:

    def __str__(self):
        return f'''The phone is {self.phone},
                    the street is {self.street},
                    the city is {self.city},
                    the state is {self.state},
                    the code is {self.code},
                    the name is {self.name},
                    and the mail is {self.mail}.'''

But i got a ````AttributeError: 'Friends' object has no attribute 'street'``` error (wasn't the point of inheritance that i could work on the subclass with the parent class data?).

I gave each class their own __str__ which is arguably bad code but doesn't work either.

How can i make print all the data of the inherited classes plus the subclass?

What is the limit of inheritance if i got a "[subclass] has no attribute" error?

  • super(Contact.self).__str__() is not how you use super... – juanpa.arrivillaga Jan 19 at 20:59
  • I was looking questions involving old code before ask, so decided to try anyway. – Flonne Jan 19 at 21:01
  • In any case, you aren't using anything with what is returned by __str__ for each of your attempted parent-class method calls. – juanpa.arrivillaga Jan 19 at 21:02
2

You need to make your base classes cooperative, by having them both call super().__init__() too:

class Contact:

    all_contacts = []

    def __init__(self, name='', email='', **kwargs):
        super().__init__(**kwargs)
        self.name = name
        self.email = email
        Contact.all_contacts.append(self)

and

class AddressHolder:
    def __init__(self, street='', city='', state='', code='', **kwargs):
        super().__init__(**kwargs)
        self.street = street
        self.city = city
        self.state = state
        self.code = code

    def __str__(self):
        return f'the street is {self.street}, the city is {self.city}, 
               the state is {self.state}, the code is {self.code}'

This works because super() searches for the named attribute (__init__ here) in the base classes of type(self) Method Resolution Order (MRO), starting at the current class (the class where the method is defined). For an instance of Friends, the MRO is:

>>> Friends.__mro__
(<class '__main__.Friends'>, <class '__main__.Contact'>, <class '__main__.AddressHolder'>, <class 'object'>)

You already are using keyword arguments to pass on extra arguments, so you'll end up with an empty kwargs dictionary at the end of your MRO, effectively calling object.__init__() with no arguments.

Note that you can also use super() in the __str__ method:

class Contact:
    # ...
    def __str__(self):
        return "\n".join([
            f'the name is {self.name}, and the mail is {self.mail}.',
            super().__str__()
        ])

class AddressHolder:
    # ...

    def __str__(self):
        return "\n".join([
            f'the street is {self.street}, the city is {self.city}, '
            f'the state is {self.state}, the code is {self.code}',
            super().__str__()
        ])

class Friends(Contact, AddressHolder):
    # ...

    def __str__(self):
        return "\n".join([
            f'The phone is {self.phone}.',
            super().__str__()

This works for any attribute that object defines:

>>> print(*dir(object()), sep="\n")
__class__
__delattr__
__dir__
__doc__
__eq__
__format__
__ge__
__getattribute__
__gt__
__hash__
__init__
__init_subclass__
__le__
__lt__
__ne__
__new__
__reduce__
__reduce_ex__
__repr__
__setattr__
__sizeof__
__str__
__subclasshook__
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  • I haven't seen super() on the parent class (some books actually tell you that HAVE to inherit from some class to use a super). I guess i have to research more about it. Thanks for the answer! – Flonne Jan 19 at 21:05
  • 1
    If you don't explicitly write a parent class, then your parent class is object; so either way, you do have a parent class to call super().__init__ on. – kaya3 Jan 19 at 21:06
  • 1
    @Flonne: as long as the parent class has the method, this works. object is the ultimate base class, and it has a __init__ method. – Martijn Pieters Jan 19 at 21:08
1

You could try and do something like this:

class A:
    def __init__(self, a):
        self.a = a

    def __str__(self):
        return self.a

class B:
    def __init__(self, b):
        self.b = b

    def __str__(self):
        return self.b

class C(A, B):
    def __init__(self, a, b, c):
        A.__init__(self, a)
        B.__init__(self, b)
        self.c = c

    def __str__(self):
        return A.__str__(self) + B.__str__(self) + self.c

c = C("a", "b", "c")
print(c)

This will print out abc. Just replace a, b, and c with the values that you want.

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