2

I have a list(s),take an example

[(35.9879845760485, -4.74093235801354), (35.9888687992442, -4.72708076713794),
(35.9889733432982, -4.72758983150694), (35.9915751019521, -4.72772881198689), 
(35.9935223025608, -4.72814213543564), (35.9941433944962, -4.72867416528065), 
(35.9946670576458, -4.72915181755908), (35.995946587966, -4.73005565674077), 
(35.9961479762973, -4.7306870912609), (35.9963563641681, -4.7313535758683), 
(35.9968685892892, -4.73182757975504), (35.9976738530666, -4.73194429867996) ]

and coord = (35.9945570576458, -4.73110757975504)

I would like to select the closets pair to coord from the list

5
  • How big can the set of coordinates get? Is it pre-determined or does it change dynamically? How many such lookups do you need to do? – NPE May 12 '11 at 16:48
  • “Close” as in the length of the vector difference? Or what exactly is “closest”? – poke May 12 '11 at 16:50
  • @aix, the corrdinates change dynamically, the lists can be long sometimes, that depends on the dataset. – user739807 May 12 '11 at 16:54
  • @poke, Yeah the vector difference, eg if i hv [1,4,7,8] and a number 5, 4 being closest to 5 – user739807 May 12 '11 at 16:55
  • Those coordinates look suspiciously like (latitude, longitude) ... if so, using dx2 + dy2 is not very accurate. – John Machin May 12 '11 at 21:23
7

Write a distance function and use builtin min function with key parameter.

>>> from functools import partial
>>> dist=lambda s,d: (s[0]-d[0])**2+(s[1]-d[1])**2 #a little function which calculates the distance between two coordinates
>>> a=[(35.9879845760485, -4.74093235801354), (35.9888687992442, -4.72708076713794), ..... ]
>>> coord = (35.9945570576458, -4.73110757975504)
>>> min(a, key=partial(dist, coord)) #find the min value using the distance function with coord parameter
(35.9961479762973, -4.7306870912609)
5
  • 1
    abs() is likely to be faster than sqrt(). – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams May 12 '11 at 17:04
  • @Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, i thought we need to calculate the exact distance, but we want just the closest coordinate, abs will work :). changing answer. – utdemir May 12 '11 at 17:09
  • @utdmr! Thanks, all i needed! – user739807 May 12 '11 at 17:19
  • 1
    I don't think you need to do abs here. It is only a substitute for finding the square root of the sum of squares. But it cannot function as a substitute for a square root, alone – inspectorG4dget May 12 '11 at 17:39
  • another good point, i thought it could be a negative number, but sum of squares cant be negative. deleting abs. – utdemir May 12 '11 at 19:03
7

You can also use a scipy cKDTree which is allows you to perform a nearest-neighbor search on arrays. This should perform better than an exhaustive search when the list of points is long:

import numpy
from scipy.spatial import cKDTree

data = numpy.array([(35.9879845760485, -4.74093235801354), (35.9888687992442,
-4.72708076713794), (35.9889733432982, -4.72758983150694), (35.9915751019521,
-4.72772881198689), (35.9935223025608, -4.72814213543564), (35.9941433944962,
-4.72867416528065), (35.9946670576458, -4.72915181755908), (35.995946587966,
-4.73005565674077), (35.9961479762973, -4.7306870912609), (35.9963563641681,
-4.7313535758683), (35.9968685892892, -4.73182757975504), (35.9976738530666,
-4.73194429867996) ])

tree = cKDTree(data)
dists, indexes = tree.query(numpy.array([35.9945570576458, -4.73110757975504]), k=3)
for dist, index in zip(dists, indexes):
    print 'distance %f:  %s' % (dist, data[index])

Output:

distance 0.001646:  [ 35.99614798  -4.73068709]
distance 0.001743:  [ 35.99594659  -4.73005566]
distance 0.001816:  [ 35.99635636  -4.73135358]
2
  • thanks! Give the same result like all solutions here! My task is to evaluate performance for larger lists – user739807 May 12 '11 at 17:17
  • Glad it was helpful. KD-trees are great for NN search of large sets of points with small dimension, and it can give you the top k nearest results by specifying the k=[number of hits] argument. – samplebias May 12 '11 at 17:18
2

Provided the list of points remains sufficiently small, a linear search should do the trick:

def dist_sq(a, b): # distance squared (don't need the square root)
  return (a[0] - b[0])**2 + (a[1] - b[1])**2

def find(l, coord):
  return min(l, key=lambda p:dist_sq(coord, p))

l = [(35.9879845760485, -4.74093235801354), (35.9888687992442, -4.72708076713794), (35.9889733432982, -4.72758983150694), (35.9915751019521, -4.72772881198689), (35.9935223025608, -4.72814213543564), (35.9941433944962, -4.72867416528065), (35.9946670576458, -4.72915181755908), (35.995946587966, -4.73005565674077), (35.9961479762973, -4.7306870912609), (35.9963563641681, -4.7313535758683), (35.9968685892892, -4.73182757975504), (35.9976738530666, -4.73194429867996) ]
coord = (35.9945570576458, -4.73110757975504)

print find(l, coord)

The same solution using numpy:

import numpy as np
l = np.array([(35.9879845760485, -4.74093235801354), (35.9888687992442, -4.72708076713794), (35.9889733432982, -4.72758983150694), (35.9915751019521, -4.72772881198689), (35.9935223025608, -4.72814213543564), (35.9941433944962, -4.72867416528065), (35.9946670576458, -4.72915181755908), (35.995946587966, -4.73005565674077), (35.9961479762973, -4.7306870912609), (35.9963563641681, -4.7313535758683), (35.9968685892892, -4.73182757975504), (35.9976738530666, -4.73194429867996) ])
coord = np.array((35.9945570576458, -4.73110757975504))
print l[np.argmin(np.apply_along_axis(np.linalg.norm, 1, l - coord))]

If that's not feasible, I suggest you look into better algorithmic approaches.

2
  • If you don't do this very often, or if the list changes frequently, it's likely that the overhead cost of a "better algorithmic approach" will outweigh the benefit, even with a very long list. Every point in the list will have to be processed at least once, whatever approach you use; the question is whether information about the relative position of points in the list is stored in a way that enables quick look-up. – senderle May 12 '11 at 17:04
  • thanks! I like the numpy solution! Will evaluate it in terms of performance with @samplebias solution – user739807 May 12 '11 at 17:15

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